Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

Haynes or Climer manuels

Recommended Posts

Im looking for the Honda Shop manuel for my XR to rebuild the fork.

Im wondering if they cover that in the Haynes or Climer books.

Sometimes the book just says to take the unit to a qualifed technician :banghead:

If I was going to do that I wouldnt need the book :banghead:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Honda manual is easier to use as the pictures are bigger and the text is less. :banghead:

But the Clymer manuals seem alomost as detailed. The only problem is when there are several models covered in the same book. It gets hard to read for an old guy. :banghead:

If you've got a local dealer that's been around a while has a copy you can borrow - or even give you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I found out that Helms, the ones that do the OEM manuels, still offers that book...36 bucks. Thats almost as much as Ive got in the whole bike!

Nice to know they're still available tho...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How do Haynes vs Clymer manuals compare?

I think I have a Clymer manual for my GMC Suburban it is nearly worthless. The photos are dark and bad. It is so generic, I can't really get much use out of it.

Honda manuals are always better, but I need them for a 1973 XL100 and 1979 XR80. The Honda shop manuals might be hard to find and expensive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Both the Clymer's and Haynes manuals will be helpful. I find the Clymer's to be a little more detailed and easier to understand because they are published in the USA. Haynes are published in the UK and some common terms are different. For instance when we refer to "ground" when discussing electrical systems, they refer to it as "earth", we say "gas" or "gasoline", they say "petrol" etc. If you have at least a little knowledge of how our common language is used differently, then you should be able to muddle through. Some of the Haynes manuals even have a page of definitions to help you overcome. But, if your language skills are 100% American, you'll find the Clymer's a little easier to understand.

Be wary of manuals that were published in Japan. Many vintage Japanese manuals (from the late '70's back,mostly) were literally translated and can be very confusing. If you can lay your hands on an original manual for your vintage bike, by all means do so but, have a Clymer's or Haynes as a backup in case you encounter such confusion. I recommend buying all the manuals you can get for a vintage bike, not only will you have multiple sources of info, they make an excellent selling point to keep your price up if you decide to sell.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd get both of 'em, if it were me!!!

It seems like one of them will generally have some bit of info that the other won't cover for whatever reason.....

I'm not British, & have never played one on TV, but for my XR500, & a few other vehicles I've owned, the Haynes seems to be the more thorough of the choices between Haynes or Clymer.

For my diesel truck, the Helms manuals have no peers, though. If the one they make for a bike is as good as what they make for the trucks, that would be the one manual I'd buy, if I could only get one manual....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...