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front end kicking up in breaking bumps

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I just switched back to my stock rear spring (settings were working perfectly for me, no kicking out or bouncing but I figure it will be even better with a spring closer to the size I need). So anyways I haven't ridden the track since I switched the spring but before I did I was just going to set my race sag and then set the clickers back to stock positions and see how that goes. I have had a problem with my forks bouncing up and down lots in braking bumps aswell. Am I doing the right thing turning the rebound clicker in a couple clicks or should I mess with the compression? Thanks for the help.

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Ok thanks. For some reason I was thinking turning the rebound screw in slows down the rebound.

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For some reason I was thinking turning the rebound screw in slows down the rebound.

It does, this is the direction you want to go.

John

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It does, this is the direction you want to go.

John

Unless the fork is soft and slow thus "packing" which will give you this same feeling. If the handlebars were shaking back & forth instead of up & down then I would lean towards slower rebound.

doc

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Also try picking a different line. Some of the bumps will kick you regardless of what you do. And the guys that are not bouncing are probably powering over them and braking late. If they are braking at all. You can come in at a slightly differnt angle, missing some of the bumps, jumping over one or two, then settling into the same turn line, or make your own new one. Try it.

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shocdoc im having the problem u said shaking back and forth on downhill breaking bumps ...

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cj-S4: I guess it is my fault. I'm always on the inside line when the outside is perfect. I also brake too early (I'm a beginner what can I say?). Anyways yesterday I started practicing braking standing up. Worked good.

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cj-S4: I guess it is my fault. I'm always on the inside line when the outside is perfect. I also brake too early (I'm a beginner what can I say?). Anyways yesterday I started practicing braking standing up. Worked good.

Thats cool, I was just trying to open your eyes. I see alot of that one line stuff at the pratice tracks around here, when you could have 30 lines in that huge turn.

If you like that inside line, do what I said before, come into it at a slightly different angle. You'll be surpized how different the bumps go if you hit them different from where everyone is hitting them. If it is a really tight inside then come from the outside alittle, if its not too tight you could angle in from the inside, hit the braking bumps at a slight angle instead of head on where everyone is hitting them. But you want to end in the same line, after the bumps.

Brake early and try it slow a few times, then start in faster and faster, you can actually use the bumps to slow you alittle, instead of the brake, then as you get out of them get on both brakes, settle into the turn, then transition to the gas as you exit the turn.

I try to slow enough before the bumps that I don't have to use the brake after them, after using them to slow a bit, I get on the gas lightly as soon as it settles in and then open it up from there. Also keep your body just slightly back from center as you take the bumps, then transition to the front on the bike as you get off the last bump and start into the turn.

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Hope you guys don't mind me jumping in here a bit.

First of all, I'm not sure if I fully understand the situation.

You reference a change to the rear assembly, a spring, but then note that your problem is with the front forks.

Did I miss the connection, or is this just about the forks moving around too much?

With that, if we are on the path that you feel you are getting too much movement from the forks, or shall we say, oscillation, then your needs are most likely directed at adding in more compression damping.

Personally, I run very little rebound in my forks, via modified stacks (as to maintain my mid-valve rates) and run the compression damping up fairly high. This is ideal for hard repetitive hits where immediate recover is often necessary - or shall I say, most of the stuff we ride on.

Hope this helps.

BTW - just curious, what spring rates are you running?

DaveJ

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Dave- I don't know why I included about the rear spring. I just threw that in for the heck of it I guess! I'm now running the stock springs. I'm thinking 4.8 in the back and .46 in the front? Something like that. The stuff that was in there was like a 5.2 and .48 (guy I bought my bike from was big) and I weigh 140!

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