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Missing ID Plate and titling issues?

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Go ahead and call me foolish to get it over with...

So, my new bike, '85 XL250R had a missing/lost title when I bought it. I got a good enough price that($650) for a bike in excellent condition, in my mind, justified the potential headaches of getting it titled in AZ.

So I've now found out that I'll have to do a vehicle inspection, then a Motor Vehicles Record Search (that goes back three years), send registered letter to last known owners (if any turn up) and try to get title or Power of Attorney to release ownership. If nothing turns up, I'll need to get a Bonded Title. Again, all this sound doable to this point.

So now I'm reading my new Clymer manual and discover there should be an ID plate from Honda on the stem identifying the make, model, year, etc. I'm not clear at this point if this plate has the VIN#, or is the VIN# stamped on the frame (on other side of stem) and the plate has some other ID #. Regardless, this plate, which is riveted on, is completely missing from the bike, though the rivets are still there.

So, will this plate being gone cause a major headache for me? Anyone have any experiences with something like this? Thanks for you inputs.

Adam

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I don't have any experience with that, but would suggest that when you go to DMV, take your lawyer's phone number with you....

Cheers,

Mac

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First of all, a bike w/o a title is worth way less than $650....probably half that amount, sorry.

Secondly the vin number is stamped on the steering head of your Honda, if it is missing or obliterated, the bike is probably stolen. Presuming there is a vin # on the steering head it must have the correct amount of digits. (Google "vin number code" for details). Presuming all are there you need to verify that the bike is not listed as stolen. Go to a local police station with the vin# and explain your need, have them run a NCIC stolen check. If it comes back clean , you have a method available, if it comes back stolen be prepared to cough up the vehicle. However impounding the vehicle by the police is not always the end of the line. Often the original titled owner cannot be located or the Lien holder has written off the loss and will abandon the vehicle to the impound agent, which in some states could be you, or a friendly towing yard ( don't count on it) who really does not want to store a 23 year old motorcycle. So something may be able to be worked out to get it back cheaply.

Now if the bike has a good clean vin, you can use www.its-titles.com on a bike of that age to get a clean title. However you have to sign an affadavit that the bike is what you say it is ( ie, including legally yours), so don't commit fraud to get a title for a 23 year old motorcycle. Do not try to make up a vin # as they do a NCIC check and a "vin check" to cover their arses too. ... but for $80.00 and 4 weeks wait it works.

OriginalDirt

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Thanks originaldirt.

It does have a clearly legible, untampered with number stamped on the steering head, it's the ID plate found on the opposite side of the head that is missing.

I'll check on the VIN with the police and go from there. Thanks for the info.

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According the the Honda Motorcycle Identification Guide, the V.I.N. number for a 1985 XL250R should read as: JH2MD110XFK1*****, and the engine number should read as: MD11E-51*****

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OK, I did a VIN # search with Carfax and Autocheck.com (the free versions- jsut says if any records for your vehicle are found).

For both of them, they correctly identify my bike as an '84. Autocheck reports it as an '84 Honda Dual-Sport. Both report zero records found for the bike, so I would venture a guess that it has not been registered any time in the past few years. So far so good...

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Thanks dirtbikr.

My VIN# is JH2MD1114EK0*****, so I think it's an '84 rather than an '85.

That's it, you got it....

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Im doing the same thing right now with an 83' XR500.

Here in Ca. all Ive had to do is complete an application for title. Im not sure if I'll have to have the Vin's verfied by CHP yet or not. The girl said I may not have to because its is such a low value vehicle.

The guy I got the bike from gave it to me but we put together a bill of sale for 200 bucks just so there would be some sort of paper trail.

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What I've found out so far for AZ is that I need to do a record search, vehicle inspection, and then if nobody shows up on the record search, I'll need to go through getting a bonded title. I'm thinking that once I call the police and make sure it's not stolen, I may go through the its-titles.com thing. I'm thinking I will be beter off to get a regular title rather than a bonded one?

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Yeah, if ITS delivers a title, it's yours, no question. The process is first you "sell" the vehicle on paper to ITS, then they get a title, then they "sell" you the vehicle back on paper. Quick 'n easy for vintage vehicles. Just make sure there is no NCIC stolen record and that the VIN is correct for the vehicle. This process also works when there is a title that has been invalidated by erasures and complicated by idiots using the original title to "transfer" ownership without retitling, ....i.e there are 2 or more owner names listed in the transfer spots when each one should have gotten a new title. States really don't like that scenario and often make the current title holder either pay for the previous transfers or contact the original owner. You just pretend there is no title and enter the valid info with your name on the ITS-Titles application. Saves lots of time and hassle.

OriginalDirt

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