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How many military riders or service personnel(police, fire, etc) here ride? What is the service's perspective on such activity? In reference to injury etc.

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Active Duty Army here. I'm stationed in Korea so not allowed to ride (or even ride around in a personally owned vehicle for that matter).

Most commanders are supportive of riding (or any sport) that their soldiers participate in and as long as the soldier took active measures to guard against (riding gear, sober, etc) injury, then their would not likely not be any administrative aciton taken.

But of course, ANY injury stemming from personal negligence is subject to punishment for damage of government property. But it rarely happens.

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I'm a Critical Care Flight Paramedic, I've been with my present employer for almost 8 years. I've been a Paramedic since I was 20. I'm 38 now and have ridden/owned bikes since I was 7. To this day, I consider bikes to be a major part of my life, because they are.

A couple of years ago I began racing MX again after a 13 year lay off. A few months into my return, I had a foot slip off the peg going through the whoops at speed. It slammed into the face of a whoop and whamo! I had a crushed tibial plateau (where the femur meets the lower leg behind the knee cap).

I was out of work for 5 months. A 10 hour surgery, 3 months on crutches and 2 more difficult months of rehab. I came back to full duty when ice was on the ground and never missed a beat.

Last year, I broke my collar bone in one of the last races of the season. I had to take about 2 weeks off. I came back to work early and worked through alot of pain. We were really short staffed.

I suffered alot of ridicule from my peers about my choice of hobby. I still do. Most of my peers hunt big game predators, do winter mountain climbing, ice climb frozen waterfalls hundreds of feet off the ground, backcountry telemarking/snowboarding and snowmachine in avalanche country, whitewater raft in 38 degree class 5 rapids for fun, yet they snicker at me racing MX. :banghead:

We're all a strange lot. We get in small jets with really sick people, fly thorough very bad weather and land on icy runways in the fog in places you can't pronounce on a routine basis. Hey, it's a good living.

I have a manager who watches out for me though, He used to race bikes and road racing go-Karts, thank god for him, HE UNDERSTANDS and gave me the time off to compete this year.

I took first in the Alaska State Championship this season in Vet. Novice, 1st in Vet. Novice in the Anchorage city series and 1st in the Homer series in 250 Nov. Best of all, I had no injuries this season in 80+ motos.

:banghead:

All too often, healthcare workers only see the injured. For the one or two that get to the emergency room, they don't see the hundreds of others who spend thousands of hours having the time of their life relatively injury free. It clouds their judgement and they retain a limited view of what motorcycles are all about. It rarely helps when a typical mini dad shows up asking when their head injured kid can get back to the track to race his second moto. 🤣

Anyways, that's my story and I'm sticking to it.

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Active Duty Air Force. The only thing they make us do is fill out more paper work on "High Risk Activities" and then fill out some more paper work and make sure you are getting briefed on the fact that is dangerous blah blah blah. As long as all the paper work is done and you are wearing proper safety gear when/if you get hurt you are good to go. But if you do get hurt, before you go to to call 911, you better call your supervisor so they can call their boss, and they can call their boss, and then they can e-mail the info to someone who has a blackberry, and they can intern e-mail another persons blackberry using their blackberry, and then someone can call safety because they need to do a report on it A.S.A.P. Lord know that if we don't have paperwork done in the Air Force 24 hours after the incident the whole f...ing world will fall apart. Then you can fill out a safety report saying why you got hurt, what you can do to prevent it from happening again, make sure to explain in great detail that there wasn't a beer bottle within 300 miles of the area in which the accident occurred, not even at the Liquor store 299.5 miles away from you because they were out, someone not riding or near you had bought all the alcohol. Then be sure to stress that you were wearing all your protective gear and even though it has nothing to do with the accident tell in your report that you put on your helmet just to push the bike out back to be washed. As long as you do that you don't get in any trouble, all your medical bills are paid, and you get to sit on your butt all day and get paid if the injury was bad enough, say a broken leg.

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Active duty AF. Been back to riding now for about 7 months since I have been on Active duty. I stopped riding about 13 years ago. Now my son rides and I ride. We have great fun. I hear ya' Tye about all the paperwork stuff.

Will

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Retired 2 years ago from a high risk military job. Always had a bum left knee I injured many times jumping out of not so perfectly good airplanes. Started riding and racing at 35 with my son who was 15 then and caught the motocross bug after I taught him to ride. At the time my sup gave me alot of crap about injuries from riding but it never went any further than that. The Officers understood that like alot of my peers we were high risk takers and our work hard play hard attitude is what made us what we are.

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Okay so I'm in the same boat. Active AF(not USAF). Some of my bosses are bikers(Harleys, cruisers etc). They always want to come out and see me ride. It is sort of unspoken but if I got hurt, lots of paper work as well, not too much reprisal. Luckily, I have only had minor crashes and hurt my back and collarbones.

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AD air force, we have to take a Motorcycle safety course (i stil havent, waiting for a class to open up when i dont have job related training classes)

Been riding around amonth or so, rode offroad for yeard

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Active duty Navy here. I have had two broken bones in the last year due to riding(none ever prior to that). I got a lot of crap on the first one, and am getting even more this time. Yeah, got to fill out safety reports and tell everyone in the chain of command. The good thing I have going for me is we have had several injuries during our command PT in the last six months.

If PT is more dangerous than off road riding I don't think anyone can question my passtime.

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Federal Bureau of Prisons. Correctional Officer. Navy 91-97. No probs with work. Several other guys ride the street (cruisers, standards, sports...) It's an excellent stress releiver.

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Full time Air National Guard! There are plans to build a Moto-x Track / Offroad riding area on the base that im at. Talk about supportive. But im sure there will be paper work of somekind dealing with the risks and whatnot. Other than that. All is good!

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Active Duty Air Force. The only thing they make us do is fill out more paper work on "High Risk Activities" and then fill out some more paper work and make sure you are getting briefed on the fact that is dangerous blah blah blah. As long as all the paper work is done and you are wearing proper safety gear when/if you get hurt you are good to go. But if you do get hurt, before you go to to call 911, you better call your supervisor so they can call their boss, and they can call their boss, and then they can e-mail the info to someone who has a blackberry, and they can intern e-mail another persons blackberry using their blackberry, and then someone can call safety because they need to do a report on it A.S.A.P. Lord know that if we don't have paperwork done in the Air Force 24 hours after the incident the whole f...ing world will fall apart. Then you can fill out a safety report saying why you got hurt, what you can do to prevent it from happening again, make sure to explain in great detail that there wasn't a beer bottle within 300 miles of the area in which the accident occurred, not even at the Liquor store 299.5 miles away from you because they were out, someone not riding or near you had bought all the alcohol. Then be sure to stress that you were wearing all your protective gear and even though it has nothing to do with the accident tell in your report that you put on your helmet just to push the bike out back to be washed. As long as you do that you don't get in any trouble, all your medical bills are paid, and you get to sit on your butt all day and get paid if the injury was bad enough, say a broken leg.

Active duty AF here too. The above is pretty darn accurate. Sounds harsh, but keeps the stupidity down. And holds the young ones in check. Why should the tax payers pay for injuries if people aren't riding with the proper safety equipement or drinking and etc. Makes sense to me. Last I checked it's a all volunteer force. Pull chalks and leave if you have heartburn with it. :banghead:

Been riding on and off my whole life. And I'm still slow. :banghead:

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16 year police officer/detective in a City of 80,000. I ride and race and have not had any issues with work. If I get hurt it's sick time, vacation time, comp time, accumualted holidays. I've never missed more than a couple days but if I run out it's on me. We have had guys out with back surgeries, knee surgeries, and other stuff, not related to moto. I don't think the Union would allow the City to control our off duty activities that do not detract from the departments reputation. We do have policies about that kind of thing, but it would not cover sports.

JP

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Im a Deputy Sheriff. The guys I all work with and for think that I am crazy, but they all love to hear the stories and see the pictures from my rides. Maybe one of these days, I'll get a helmet mounted camera system and really make them think that I am crazy! Just had to take two weeks off for a knee injury. Everyone was supportive an dtold me to take as much time as I needed. I could have gone on light duty, but that is lame, and sitting around the house drinking beer was much more fun, since I have the sick time stored up.

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How many military riders or service personnel(police, fire, etc) here ride? What is the service's perspective on such activity? In reference to injury etc.

US Navy (soon) here. To be honest I dont know yet. We'll soon find out.

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Active Duty Army here. I'm stationed in Korea so not allowed to ride (or even ride around in a personally owned vehicle for that matter).

Most commanders are supportive of riding (or any sport) that their soldiers participate in and as long as the soldier took active measures to guard against (riding gear, sober, etc) injury, then their would not likely not be any administrative aciton taken.

But of course, ANY injury stemming from personal negligence is subject to punishment for damage of government property. But it rarely happens.

Where are you in the ROK? I was in JSA and Camp Casey 94-95. Loved it, had a hell of a time. :banghead:

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Where are you in the ROK? I was in JSA and Camp Casey 94-95. Loved it, had a hell of a time. :banghead:

I was wondering that too. I was at Kunsan AB the entire year of 1978. A lot has probably changed since then. Steny

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Back to post. DOD Firefighter, 29 years (ready to retire next July with 30 years). Broke right wrist in Reserves back in 82. Off reserve duty for 8 weeks. Going to school at time, so big deal there. Learn to use left hand.

Fire Department, numerous sprains, back injures (dam ladders) and broken fingers/toes, off work 3-10 weeks depending on how severe.

Operation to stomach in 12/02. Off work 4 months.

Broken right wrist in 9/03 riding in Baja. Off work 10 months. :banghead:

Shaterred elbow in 4/05 riding in Baja. Still off work for another 2-3 months. :banghead: Pins come out in 45 days.

FD not happy I'm gone🤣 , but we have a private disability that covers us with 66&2/3% pay for both on duty and off duty accidents. So my pay has been fine.

My BC wants me to stop riding bikes until I retire. Its nice to live in America and want something. Its even nicer to say no. 🤣 Steny

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Active duty AF here too. The above is pretty darn accurate. Sounds harsh, but keeps the stupidity down. And holds the young ones in check. Why should the tax payers pay for injuries if people aren't riding with the proper safety equipement or drinking and etc. Makes sense to me. Last I checked it's a all volunteer force. Pull chalks and leave if you have heartburn with it. :banghead:

Been riding on and off my whole life. And I'm still slow. :banghead:

No heatburn, I have done it for 12 years, just being a touch sarcastic because I do think it is a little overboard, I live in the AETC world so it is even more so. You know about the AETC Form29B right? Doesn't matter if you have a house, three kids and been married for 5 years you better do the paper work if you leave town untill you are a big boy at the age of 26, I hated those things.

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