Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

Zero Confidence Front Forks

Recommended Posts

So my first post with TT! Recently I bought a 1986 TT350 Yamaha. I am really happy with the bike except for the front suspension.

The front forks felt really stiff so I changed the fork oil (Looked like hadn't ever been done). I now have a major improvement but I still feel like the bike is "loose" when riding at moderate to higher speeds. I have also been playing with tire pressure on Michelin M12 front by starting low and now running 13psi. This has also helped but still not quite there. Any thoughts from anyone would be great!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My first reaction would be to tell you that you're going to be limited simply for the fact that you're dealing with an older piece of technology. It's either too old of a design or it could just be worn out.

However, that's not to say that it's impossible, or at least, good enough to perhaps work out some bugs and get it to where one could expect something on par with the original design. Perhaps there is a fault that could be squared up.

Now that I have rambled, what any of us would really need to know is what you mean by "loose". Are the bars shaking? Is the wheel slipping? When does it happen? What else is it doing? How fast are going? What terrain?

And most importantly, how much money do you have to throw at the problem?

DaveJ

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well by "loose" I mean I don't feel like I have good stability, I feel like my front tire is hopping around. I don't have any vibration thru the bars and I am maybe travelling at 30 to 35 mph. This is usually on logging roads in good condition with the usual pot holes and rocks.

This has dramatically improved with new fork oil (10weight) and also by bumping up tire pressure. However I am still looking to improve it a bit more.

I was wondering about replacing the old fork springs with a set of new progressive springs or possibly shortening the spacers. Not to sure about the later though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The '86 TT 350 has the classic damper rod forks. IMHO the only thing worth doing to these is installing correct spring rates and heavy oil (I would start with 20 wt, dont be afraid to try 50wt).

You could install an emulator valve, or do some creative re-drilling of the damping holes, but you are still going to have a fork that huge internal clearances.

Take Care, John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...