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Italian hand made TM 300

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Whats the deal with these? TM not KTM Italian hand made dirt bike. I would guess they are good bikes but would be expensive to get fixed or get parts. Looks like a good bike for a good price. I will say that I saw this same bike at this dealership for about a year or more :banghead::banghead:

TM 300

Looking down at the specs it does say manufacturer KTM? IM confused

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KTM owns TM Racing.

Good luck finding a reputable dealer inside the United States. And if you thought it was hard finding some parts for KTM's...good luck with TM. There are no dealers (to my knowledge) and no one really knows anything about these bikes, so finding a good mechanic will be a long, hard fought process.

I'll be surprised if they do so much as to offer a manual in English.

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KTM owns TM Racing.

Good luck finding a reputable dealer inside the United States. And if you thought it was hard finding some parts for KTM's...good luck with TM. There are no dealers (to my knowledge) and no one really knows anything about these bikes, so finding a good mechanic will be a long, hard fought process.

I'll be surprised if they do so much as to offer a manual in English.

Thanks, thats what I figured and why its been there so long!!

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Actually TM's are easy to deal with. Lots of parts available. Lots of know-how. Several great dealers in the USA...they make a bitchin bike that fits right in with those who like a nice pinot with their fillet mignon...

www.motoxotica.com

talk to Dan. He's got lots of TM parts, knows all about the bikes, etc.

these bikes are rad. yeah they arent for guys who drive Corollas--but they are very cool.

parts arent an issue for any bike in the world of internet and next day air...

in fact getting parts for my Husqvarna is faster, easier and cheaper than for my Hondas!

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I'm pretty sure KTM doesn't have anything to do with KTM, that's just a mistake on the website. KTM does own Husaberg and they are selling motors to Beta for their new 4-stroke bike. Could that be what you're thinking of ONLY4STROKES? As to TMs, I think irondude summed it up pretty well.

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They have absolutely nothing to do with KTM. They are family owned as far as I know. I am buying a tm125 on wednesday, cant wait. The 125's are suppose to be 37-40 hp stock. They are stone reliable and out last all jap and ktm machines in the same class. One of the larger dealers in the us has not sold a single valve for the mx 4's. They have been made since '02 or before.

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Actually TM's are easy to deal with. Lots of parts available. Lots of know-how. Several great dealers in the USA...they make a bitchin bike that fits right in with those who like a nice pinot with their fillet mignon...

www.motoxotica.com

talk to Dan. He's got lots of TM parts, knows all about the bikes, etc.

these bikes are rad. yeah they arent for guys who drive Corollas--but they are very cool.

parts arent an issue for any bike in the world of internet and next day air...

in fact getting parts for my Husqvarna is faster, easier and cheaper than for my Hondas!

I stand corrected. Thanks dude.

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Hey ONLY4STROKES- Don't know what part of nevada you're in, but there a dealer in Reno. If your close, go check 'em out. They are very nice bikes built with top quality parts. Oh, the dealer is Cycles & Gear on Keitzke ln. in Reno.

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there are essentially two bikes on earth:

Jap and Euro

1) the jap bikes are very similar to each other:

similar suppliers for everything from forks to carbs to bearings to valves.

also very similar styles of engineering the bikes--similar design values. They are VERY heavily US motocross focused with some wife/entry level bikes. They know price point is big with the masses--and so they try to keep things $1000 or so cheaper than the euros. This often means throw away rims, bars, triple clamps, chains, sprockets, etc. Dont look for any extra little gizmo-like quick release axles or programable computers or high-end sub-frames...

2) the euro bikes-KTM, Gas-Gas, Husqvarna, Husaberg, TM, Sherco, and others are also very similar to each other. They have their own set of suppliers. Things like Ohlings forks, brembo breaks, sachs shocks, etc.

They also have different design focus than japan--but its fairly similar between the euro bikes. They are VERY enduro/cross country focused.

They know they cant compete with the mass-produced jap bikes and so they go with high end components and are generally $1000 more than jap bikes.

Things like steel tube frames, mello power bands, and niche market gearing coupled with the best rims, forks, chains, bars, etc. Plus most euro bikes have some cool extras--Huskies fold-out battery or Shercos fuel injection or KTM's incredible Hard Parts catalogue...

So the entry level masses get into bikes and dont want to spend a fortune and look for a strong local dealer and price--plus they look over a shoulder at what everyone else is riding--and buy not bad Japanese bikes.....but then at some point riders get a bit older and get a bit more money and learn how to work on their bike and appreciate the value of a euro bike's quality--even if buy-in is a bit more....and then--bam...the Honda is gone and a Husqvarna is in the garage!

Of course there are the local exceptions--Highlanders, Rajdoots, Urals, Indian Enfields, ATK's, and my favorite--Puch....but those are not international brands.

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TM's are really good bikes. I owned 5 of them from 2000 to 2002. My Dad owned and dealership and we carried TM's. Sure they are not very popular and they don't produce very many of them. But in the 2 years that I owned them I never had a problem with any of them. They come with some excellent parts both hand-made and aftermarket. They are family owned out of Italy. They are not associtated with any other offroad mx company. If my Dad would of not closed his shop up I would still be riding them. Excellent bikes for the price. There is also a very good dealer in Illinois that sells them.

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Tm's motors are stronger then everything else out there. They make 125 engines for carts and dominate in that world. They are more demanding to ride but if you are up to it they will hang with anything out there. For parts and bikes on the east coast Ben is the man. He is in maryland. He has a few left over 125's brand new for 4000. They will kill all the jap 125's and even 250f's.

tmmotorcycleseast.com

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They have absolutely nothing to do with KTM. They are family owned as far as I know. I am buying a tm125 on wednesday, cant wait. The 125's are suppose to be 37-40 hp stock. They are stone reliable and out last all jap and ktm machines in the same class. One of the larger dealers in the us has not sold a single valve for the mx 4's. They have been made since '02 or before.

Hey, I own a bridge in Brooklyn, and a big dam in front of Lake Mead. Want to make a deal? I'll sell either or both to you cheap. For a special price. Because its you, dude. :banghead::banghead:

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Hey, I own a bridge in Brooklyn, and a big dam in front of Lake Mead. Want to make a deal? I'll sell either or both to you cheap. For a special price. Because its you, dude. :banghead::banghead:

look who's talking, honda boy, hehe

good thread, here's what I found looking around:

The History of TM Racing

It all started in Pesaro, Italy way back in 1976. Two friends who had one great passion in common: motorcycles & racing. Then later, thanks to the excellent quality and high performance of their motorcycles, that tiny enterprise from Pesaro became a huge force to be reckoned with in just a few years.

The pioneers of TM Racing, Claudio Flenghi and Francesco Battistelli (or rather "Mr Engine" and "Mr Frame") are two childhood friends of the same age who have spent a large part of their lives in direct contact with the world of motorcycles.

At just 12 years old and already working in car and motorcycle workshops, Flenghi particularly, in just a few years assimilated considerable experience working in sectors of great technical interest such as the Motob“ racing department and the Benelli experimentation and testing center.

Battistelli, with a love of motocross, managed to involve his friend Flenghi in his passion and after an initial phase in which they dabbled with improving the performance of their friends' bikes as a hobby, they decided to do the job in earnest by preparing an Aermacchi on which Battistelli won the regional championship.

In the meantime Flenghi began to cultivate his real interest, that is to say the world of Go Kart racing, gaining important experience on two-stroke engines. And so the idea was formed of building an original motorcycle with an engine made by themselves. Flenghi set to work, coming up with his first engine in a short time which was to be fitted into a motocross frame built by the competent Battistelli, who also took care of road testing the bike. This is how, in 1976, the first experimental bike was born and which was entrusted to two young riders who immediately achieved results far above their wildest expectations.

In 1977 the two friends left their respective occupations and founded their motorcycle making enterprise which was registered under the name of TM (from the initials of the names of the sons of Flenghi and Battistelli - Thomas and Mirko).

Still in 1977, a bike was entrusted to Gastone Serafini, a young rider from Pesaro, who was to be a determining figure in helping Battistelli in developing the bike and who would go on to achieve competition results of the highest level.

At the 1977 Milan Motorcycle Show TM was to attain unexpected success that would urge it to move its premises from Flenghi's small workshop to a new and more well equipped factory located in the Pesaro industrial zone. It was in exactly this period that the Serafini family stepped in to became part of the organisation and in so doing the production figure of 200 motocross bikes was reached in 1978.

In 1979 TM expanded its racing team adding Tommaso Lolli alongside Gastone Serafini, the bike continued to develop and it was in this year too that the first TM enduros were built.

In 1982 Battistelli decided to leave TM and his place was taken over by Gastone Serafini who, having reached the end of his professional racing career, decided to join Flenghi full time in running the company.

The following years saw a succession of different riders at the controls of TM motorcycles achieving excellent results both nationally and internationally. All the while, equally excellent results were achieved in the Kart sector. TM soon became a leader in every sector they raced in.

TM has always distinguished itself with their winning philosophy... First, the choice of materials must always be of the highest quality. Then the workmanship must be precise, even defined by some as "obsessive". Last, but not least, the high performance of the engines used on standard TM bikes which in many cases is far superior to those of the most prestigious competitors.

This justifies the prices of these jewels of engineering that appeal to a niche market made up of very demanding customers. They can in fact purchase a standard product with which to race in high level competition.

All the rest is recent history and the advent of 4-stroke engines has certainly not taken TM unawares, having worked hard and in a short period been able to expand its range with three new 4-stroke cylinder capacities 250/400/530 cc. In addition, great attention has been paid to development of the new 450 cc, which will inevitably replace the 400 cc eventually, more due to market trends however than for reasons of trying to increase the performance of the already powerful 400 cc...

...and The Story will go on...

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Nice write up. Nice pic. I considered getting a 530 for baja racing. Maybe next time...

Its also worth pointing out that a TM has been in the top 10 for most of this years FIM MX2 series....

Yeah TM is cool. Its the creme de la creme of off-road.

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if you like tm's i suggest you have a good dealer who is a fanatic with his product and close bye.

tm make a good exotic motorcycle, but like the other small manufacturers they have issues that need attention.

you need a dealer who knows these bikes and can attend any manufacture faults, otherwise you going to give yourself a huge headache.

ive test rode tm's in aus to race for the dealer in 02, i love the idea of an exotic bike, but dont kid youself its like buying a ferrari in a motor car it would be more like buying a fiat. nippon's make them better

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