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lighten flywheel question????

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hi, i am looking into getting my flywheel lightened but why does bbr say to not get it done if you play areound in your yard or dunes or tight trails?

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You might try searching this forum for it? There have been numorous threads about it.

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mines quicker Before asking use the SEARCH button! and with smaller words to make sure they understand

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I might use part of your sig as mine sometime. I want to put" Don't ask what bike is fast.. You race them and tell us. "

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use it people need to learn not to ask that

How is my sig now :banghead:?

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I don't know what all the other junk about signatures has to do with the flywheel question, but heres my flywheel answer.

My guess to BB Rs comments are if you are riding trails and or Dunes with the lightened flywheel you will be more likely to stall. A heavier flywheel keeps the motor running a slower speeds and resists stalling. It also slows the motors ability to rev.

Obviously, the opposite would apply to a lighter flywheel. Quicker revs, but easier to stall.

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no! no! no!

Power is a function of engine components. You can change a engines power curve and performance by changing many things; most common are things that improve air flow; mods to intake or exhaust, change a cam or modify the head. Compression or displacement with pistons and/or boring.

The flywheel is a mass attached to the crankshaft. Changes to the mass of the flywheel will not effect any of these. The mass of the flywheel is intended to help keep the engine spinning through the non-compression strokes.

Simple physics, the greater the mass the the more effort required to get it moving and to get it to stop. so, again, heavy flywheel less stalling and slower reving. Lighter flywheel more stalling and faster reving.

The only way the flywheel effects power is how quickly you get to or through the power band.

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no! no! no!

Power is a function of engine components. You can change a engines power curve and performance by changing many things; most common are things that improve air flow; mods to intake or exhaust, change a cam or modify the head. Compression or displacement with pistons and/or boring.

The flywheel is a mass attached to the crankshaft. Changes to the mass of the flywheel will not effect any of these. The mass of the flywheel is intended to help keep the engine spinning through the non-compression strokes.

Simple physics, the greater the mass the the more effort required to get it moving and to get it to stop. so, again, heavy flywheel less stalling and slower reving. Lighter flywheel more stalling and faster reving.

The only way the flywheel effects power is how quickly you get to or through the power band.

:banghead::banghead:🤣 exactly🤣

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no! no! no!

Power is a function of engine components. You can change a engines power curve and performance by changing many things; most common are things that improve air flow; mods to intake or exhaust, change a cam or modify the head. Compression or displacement with pistons and/or boring.

The flywheel is a mass attached to the crankshaft. Changes to the mass of the flywheel will not effect any of these. The mass of the flywheel is intended to help keep the engine spinning through the non-compression strokes.

Simple physics, the greater the mass the the more effort required to get it moving and to get it to stop. so, again, heavy flywheel less stalling and slower reving. Lighter flywheel more stalling and faster reving.

The only way the flywheel effects power is how quickly you get to or through the power band.

Great, well said :banghead::banghead:

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I'd like to be able to read a thread on here once in a while without all you 'post count' whores getting your 3 or 4 replies in relative to...'see my sig'.

1900 posts since dec 04'. congradulations! rofl!

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I'd like to be able to read a thread on here once in a while without all you 'post count' whores getting your 3 or 4 replies in relative to...'see my sig'.

1900 posts since dec 04'. congradulations! rofl!

Gotta problem with that? I say you need to watch &%$#@! you say noob.I actualy don't care about my post count.. Didn't even know what I was up to until you stated that. Congrats to maineridingfamily who was being a post whore for calling someone else a post whore :banghead: Get a life :banghead: .

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no! no! no!

Power is a function of engine components. You can change a engines power curve and performance by changing many things; most common are things that improve air flow; mods to intake or exhaust, change a cam or modify the head. Compression or displacement with pistons and/or boring.

The flywheel is a mass attached to the crankshaft. Changes to the mass of the flywheel will not effect any of these. The mass of the flywheel is intended to help keep the engine spinning through the non-compression strokes.

Simple physics, the greater the mass the the more effort required to get it moving and to get it to stop. so, again, heavy flywheel less stalling and slower reving. Lighter flywheel more stalling and faster reving.

The only way the flywheel effects power is how quickly you get to or through the power band.

I agree. :banghead::banghead:

In real world riding, the heavier flywheel stores energy and adds torque to the peak torque produced by the engine (stored energy + peak torque capability), so in short bursts you actually have an engine that produces more torque than a similar engine with a lighter flywheel (acts like a torquier larger cc engine). The drawback is the engine spins up slower, but in trail riding situations the smoother power flow to the rear wheel helps maintain traction, and the added torque available can be used to break the rear wheel loose when needed for power sliding corners (pull clutch, wind up engine and dump clutch, kind of along the same lines as a 2smoke), along with the added benefit of a harder to stall engine under braking.

IMHO: If you're not riding at peak rpm all the time, leave the heavy flywheel alone.

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I agree. :banghead::banghead:

In real world riding, the heavier flywheel stores energy and adds torque to the peak torque produced by the engine (stored energy + peak torque capability), so in short bursts you actually have an engine that produces more torque than a similar engine with a lighter flywheel (acts like a torquier larger cc engine). The drawback is the engine spins up slower, but in trail riding situations the smoother power flow to the rear wheel helps maintain traction, and the added torque available can be used to break the rear wheel loose when needed for power sliding corners (pull clutch, wind up engine and dump clutch, kind of along the same lines as a 2smoke), along with the added benefit of a harder to stall engine under braking.

IMHO: If you're not riding at peak rpm all the time, leave the heavy flywheel alone.

agree🤣🤣

you also said ''the heavier flywheel stores energy and adds torque to the peak torque produced by the engine" good wording🤣:busted:

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I race hare scrambles with the lightened flywheel and love it. It takes TONS of time getting used to and i got so mad the first tiem i raced with it, but after you get over the fact you have to feather the clutch and stay on your toes, i reccomend...

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