Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

If Lowering Links are generally bad...

Recommended Posts

What other options are there for lowering my 2001 DRZ400S. I've shaved the seat foam down, That helped considerably. I've searched the old threads and just found that everyone for the most part was disgusted with the lowering links, particularly the suspension problems. All I need is maybe .75"-1.0". Any ideas?? :banghead:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i used the kouba link #1's..... i like'em..... i'm around 5'10" or so and around 145lbs. seemed to solve my problem and they didn't seem to make my bike too squishy or anything.... feels like it hooks up better

the #1 links lowered mine 3/4 of an inch....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I got the DRZ1 as well. I'm happy with them. Didn't change the feel of suspension that much.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I'm not exactly 145#'s. More like 200. and actually as I was reading the archived threads you lighter weight riders did have better luck with them. Thanks for the input.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A fully equiped suspension shop can put a stop inside the shock so it does not extend as far. You can lower any amount that way. For small amounts (like an inch) it will not afftect the spring as there is enough adjustent for preload. At 200 lb you may want to go to a heavier spring also.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's nothing wrong with using the link to lower the bike if you do all of the other things you need to do.

Slide the tubes up to keep the trim and weight distribution right and go with one size bigger (For your weight) shock spring. I.e. the stock spring is a 5.3 and is for a 180# rider so with the link you'd need a 5.5 if you weigh that same 180#'s.

Keep in mind that you'll lose some ground clearance and the bike may be harder to wheelie if you do lower it.

:banghead:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a DRZ-1 link on my bike with stock springs and it works fine. In fact I like it in the woods cause the back end does not hit me in the butt when I go over a log like it did with the stock link. Now if you are in faster open stuff you will probably need a bigger spring to compensate for the higher leverage ratio. Also like the others have said raise the forks the same amount as you lower it in the rear. Ground clearance is a little less but not bad. I am thinking about shaving the seat instead and bringing the bike back to stock height with the DRZ-1 link installed.

Perry

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is just my personal experience so take it for what it is worth. I did the drz1 link and it really messed up the way it handled. I am 185 and went up to a 5.7 rear spring and lowered the handle bars. I tried for 2 months to get the suspension to handle right but I had no luck. I almost began to hate the bike. I went back to the stock link and I couldnt believe the improvement.

If you want to buy some drz1 links I have them for half price.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I weigh 180 to 190, to track straight under full throttle with out fish tail I run right at maximum preload for stock spring , stiffer high speed compression and almost maximum low speed compression, but it's works really great for high speed street.

I just lightly bottom on 8 ft drop offs above 70 mph , if mainly offroad I'd have to go the heavier springs front and rear, but for street I'm able to set up well for that, but the bike is pretty tall, taller than stock.

I like the ground clearnance though, I'm only 5'9

so if you go to link IMO heavier spring will be a must

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cyclejockey- The main ways to lower your seat height are:

Lowering link- inexpensive, but often messes up the bikes handling.

Cut the seat foam- inexpensive, but less comfortable and to stand up for bumps is like doing deep knee bends.

Shorten the suspension- expensive, and you will lose travel, affecting aggressive off road riding considerably.

Cut the sub-frame- this can introduce a whole lot of problems, but if done right it can really help for not a lot of money.

I tried the Kouba Link DRZ-2 and I just couldn't make it work right. I bought the heavier rear spring too. Things were unbalanced. I cut my seat, and my knees are very tired after a long ride. I had my suspension lowered 1 1/2" and it affected ride quality worse than the Kouba Link, just in different ways. And when you lower it, they don't let you keep all that new clearance. Your tuner will tell you to decrease your race sag some, so in my case I only got to lower the seat height half of what I paid for, 3/4", and the remaining travel is harsh or bottoms.

The $200 for the Kouba Link and 5.7 kg spring was a much better deal then the $700 for the lowering and re-valving job. There is no happy compromise for us short guys. Sorry.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

at 200lbs you can get two probs solved at once by going with a heavier spring. I am 215ish and went with 5.7 rear spring and .48 front spring. The heavier spring is actually a bit shorter than stock. Here's the way I figure it works (but I may be looking at it from a weird angle as it is my own interpretation of observed data): heavy spring ramps up (gets stiffer) faster (steeper slope if graphed), softer stock spring gets stiffer more slowly (shallower slope when graphed) but, in order to get the rate up where it is needed for a heavy rider, the stock spring must be pre-loaded up that slope quite a ways, thereby starting you out at a higher initial rate and ending at a lower rate. This gives you a ride that is initially stiff (and tall), but overall is too soft. A stiffer spring will be initially softer (and lower) but overall stiffer (mid-full travel). For what it's worth, my 5.7 rear spring sits my bike about 1-1 1/2 inches lower than my friends' bikes with highly pre-loaded stock springs and its ride feels softer initially but with more control over big whoops and hard hits.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...