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Woods riding on MX suspension

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Hey guys,

i have an 03 kx125. its set up for me, a C motocross rider weighing 120 lbs. Its PERFECT for motocross

however, when i do harescrambles, i get thrown around pretty good by all of the rocks and roots.

what should i do with my settings for Compression/rebound on the front and back? also, what should i do with sag, and fork height? thanks alot,

peter

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I would leave the settings alone. If you already like the current set-up, sometimes you run the risk of never finding that "sweet spot" again! Make the woods riding make you into a better rider. If anything else, it sounds like you need more stability. Leave the settings alone and just drop the forks in the clamps 5 to 10mm. Tighten your chain a bit by pulling your rear wheel back some. This overall should improve stability because of a wider wheelbase.

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I would leave the settings alone. If you already like the current set-up, sometimes you run the risk of never finding that "sweet spot" again! Make the woods riding make you into a better rider. If anything else, it sounds like you need more stability. Leave the settings alone and just drop the forks in the clamps 5 to 10mm. Tighten your chain a bit by pulling your rear wheel back some. This overall should improve stability because of a wider wheelbase.

I don't want to dis you DJO269 but that is probably the wrong way to go.

Dirtbike987, I ride in the woods and spend some time on MX tracks. I also have done my own suspension for the last ten years. Valving that works on the MX track does not work in the roots and rocks. The problem is that your MX high speed valving is too stiff to respond to the roots and rocks.

The first thing to do is record all of your current settings so you can return to them.

If you are running into exposed roots on the trails you ride, they are probably pretty tight. In that case, RAISE your fork tubes 5-10mm to make the bike handle quicker. Or, you can reduce your race sag.

Back out your shock rebound until the bike starts to kick, then go back in 1 click. The shock rebound clicker adjusts both rebound AND compression. You want this setting out as far as possible for woods riding.

Back out your highspeed shock compression. This will allow the rear end respond to the roots. High speed shock compression adjustments are very sensitive. I record mine in 12ths of a turn by counting the "flats and points" of the high speed compression adjusting nut. I would start with 9/12 (3/4) turn out from where you are now. You will be amazed at the difference this adjustment makes.

Back out your fork compression clickers two clicks at a time, until the bike gets hard to hold in a consistant line in fast sweeper type corners. Then, go back in two clicks. Most guys run their MX valved fork compression clickers all the way out when they are in the woods.

I hope this helps and have fun testing!

PeterJ

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One other thing: Try to run a softer terrain tire up front with about 12psi. Tires like a Dunlap 739 or 491 will not come up out of ruts as easily and are more likely to slide on a root than say a 756. I like the Pirelli MT32A in the woods.

PeterJ

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