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Rock riding help needed

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It seems like alot of my riding here in southern nevada consists of 3 types of trail - quarter sized gravel, grapefruit sized rocks, and basket ball sized rocks. Right now the only semi-successful technique is on the the quarter sized and that is to do the basic stand on the pegs, go 15-20 mph and let the bike kinda squirrel below me. If anyone could give any tips on any of the rock types, it would be greatly appreciated. :banghead:

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Don't stay too rigid, you will most likely deflect off some rocks and keeping your self in a relaxed focused position will allow you to get through some nasty stuff. If you're too stiff, the impacts will transfer through the bike to your body and down you go.

Keep your eyes out ahead of you. A hundred people in here will tell you not to stare at the rock in front of you, and there's a reason for that. You will hit it.

Choose your line, and with practice you will get more confident and faster through the rocks. As you mentioned stay up on the pegs, and squeezing the tank with your knees gives you some added control too.

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I saw a short article in the November 2004 issue of Dirt Rider about rock riding. I still happen to have it. I can email it in black and white PDF if you want.

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I'm certainly no expert, but I do OK in the rocks. I try to pick my line, but when all else fails, stand, stay loose, let the bike move beneath you and blast right over them. I was leary until I learned that the bike will go over a lot of big stuff. Also, as I've heard a hundred times before, stay on the gas. :banghead:

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Throttle Control

Light on the front end

Balanced on the bike

High Gears

I ride 3 or 4 local places with good size rocks every which way. Standing or sitting really makes no difference to me, just make sure you square up first, that's the real key, if you go in sloppy, chances are you come out sloppy.

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Two words: steering stabilizer. Expert riders seem to do fine without them, but for less talented individuals (like me) they make a world of difference. Its worth every penny. A properly valved suspension makes a huge difference too.

Have you ridden up at Cold Creek yet? You can ride 5 miles without touching anything but rocks. Riding buddies without stabilizers are exhausted in the first 15 minutes, while the rest of us are just getting warmed up.

Jerry

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two words: suspension setup. if your suspension is dialed, rocks get alot easier. my klx is a pain in the rocks because the rear suspension is not rock-friendly and it tends to push rocks around and deflect suddenly. my ktm's are awesome in the rocks. one was revalved by dick's racing, the other by PRS in utah.

other than suspension, stay loose, weight the footpegs, look where you want to go. same stuff that works everywhere else, but if you forget your fundamentals in the rocks the consequences are harsher and come more quickly.

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It seems like alot of my riding here in southern nevada consists of 3 types of trail - quarter sized gravel, grapefruit sized rocks, and basket ball sized rocks. Right now the only semi-successful technique is on the the quarter sized and that is to do the basic stand on the pegs, go 15-20 mph and let the bike kinda squirrel below me. If anyone could give any tips on any of the rock types, it would be greatly appreciated. :banghead:

On gravel you can go much, much faster - It's pretty much like dunes. Lean back and floor it. dial your fork and shork for hard compression and fast rebound.

Over rocks it's different. dial your fork and shock to soft compression and slow rebound. You can't really floor it over rocks... Just stand up, look ahead, and let the bike do the work for you.

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i have a little different approach to other people, if its an area you need to ride slow, say 1st or second gear, i stand and move my body weight a lot, up, down, forward, back, tight legged, loose legged.

if im in 3rd gear up stuff, and this can be a mixture of handgrenade and football size stuff, i stand but basically have my butt touching the seat, try to get my centre of gravity as low as possible standing, hold the bike tight inbetween my legs, when the bike is deflected of a rock into the air directon your keeping the bike vertical and where it lands it lands, try to aim in a straight line.

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i am alway riding in rocks of all sizes. You want to stay loose but not to loose the bike jumps away, try to keep most weight on the rear tire never let front tire sink or plow so stay on the gas. you can sit with weight on back but standing is better. pick your line and look ahead

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Where We Ride, It Is Almost All Rock. Loose Gravel All The Way Up To Rock Ledges. The Best Advise I Have Is To Always Look Where You Want To Go, And Never Look Where You Dont Want To Go.

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On gravel you can go much, much faster - It's pretty much like dunes. Lean back and floor it. dial your fork and shork for hard compression and fast rebound.

Over rocks it's different. dial your fork and shock to soft compression and slow rebound. You can't really floor it over rocks... Just stand up, look ahead, and let the bike do the work for you.

I would tend to think you have your suspension setup backwards. Rocks like Colorado I use soft compression and fast rebound. Gravel I don't even worry or adjust my suspension for, ride it like sand.

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I ride a ton of rock filled trails. Like Velo said, suspension setup helps a ton.

The other thing I do is make sure to keep your speed up a little. Keep some momentum through the rock filled sections. The rotational inertia from the wheels will help you ride through tough areas. Go too slow and you lose this advantage.

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A steering stabilizer and properly adjusted suspension are both very helpful on rocks. Try setting your forks/shock at different settings. With a little trial and error, you'll probably find whats right for you. Also, don't keep your arms/legs too stiff. And don't forget to look ahead to find the best line.

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