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Setting up a bike shipped to me.....

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OK...rookie question here. I've never even considered buying a bike and having it shipped but the out of state prices on KTM's may be too good to pass up. I'm talking about $1200-1400 based on the quotes I'm betting so far.

So what's involved when it arrives? Do they just drop some wooden crate on my driveway? What all need to be "put together/installed". If it's like a mounatin bike, I'll have to install the front wheel and handlebars....any more than that?

I want to make sure it's something a friend (very knowledgable) and I could do. I'm sure a local KTM shop wouldn't be real excited about me going around them on price to start with?? :banghead:

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i saw a bike in a crate just the other day...needed front wheel, front fender, bars, and fluids as far as i can remember - not difficult at all.

If they ship forward air, they may have bike all put together for you - again, maybe.

good luck

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My Yamahas needed the front wheel and fender, plus handlebars. My Hondas had the fender on, but needed the front wheel and bars, plus a little bit of extra oil. It doesn't take any more than half an hour to set up a new bike, including disassembling the crate.

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Helped a buddy with his 450 exc. It was a piece of cake. Very straight forward. Put bars on , clutch and brake fluids already installed. Put the front wheel on and add engine oil . It took some paperwork to get the green sticker.

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Bought my bike elsewhere and it was shipped in its original crate, never assembled yet. It wasnt all boxed it, just a metal fram around it. It was strapped with 6 ratchet tie downs, 3 on each side, suspecnsion was fully compressed. The crate unbolted to expose the bike. And after releasing the 6 straps, it grew to twice the size. The only thing I needed to do was bolt on the handlebars (was wire tied to the top of the crate, but cables etc all hooked up) and add oil, hook up the battery. Was full of factory coolant already. Tires were already one etc. Total set up time was about 30 minutes. Checked all the hardware and been riding it for 2 seasons now, just clicked 500 miles and zilch in trouble.

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I remembered this article in TWMX. This may helps some at looking at some other things then just throwing on the bars and taking off....... anyway hope it helps.

Tuesday Tip: New Bike Prep

Ever wonder what the manufacturers do to a test bike before they hand them over to the magazines? So did we, so we put that question to Honda's Eric Crippa when we picked up the new Honda CRF450. Of course, this stuff also applies to anyone who's planning on buying a new bike this season, so here's what Eric had on his list:

We broke them in with a couple 15-minute rides.

Tightened the spokes.

Checked the steering stem nut.

We tightened the screw that holds the front of the seat down…the little disc, and also the fenders.

As far as other nuts and bolts, maybe the kickstarter and rear brake lever…those are the key things that you want to check.

Adjusted the chain, of course.

As far as setup, we lube the throttle tube (see last week's Tuesday Tip for more detail).

You also want to remove the cosmoline grease off your disk brakes with a clean rag and some contact cleaner. That keeps your pads cleaner and brakes working better.

ED. NOTE: Be sure to watch your fingers while working around the disks! They're really sharp, and if the wheel is spinning, they're the motorcycle equivalent of a meat slicer!

You really should grease your bearings a little more in the steering head and linkage. When they come into the country if they have too much grease, and a speck of grease drops off, the EPA will go nuts. If you can add more grease, it's better. We have a Pro Honda moly grease that's really good.

That's really all you need…but read that owner's manual from front to back. There's a lot of good information in there.

Of course, we've skipped a couple common items like checking tire pressure and gas, and other fluid levels.

Eric also offered up one post-break-in tip: "Of course you change the engine oil after every 2-3 rides—that's a no-brainer. But after the first two months, I'd also change the suspension fluids. A lot of people don't change them, but it's just like a motor. There's going to be some flakeage, and some contamination in the oil that you want to get out. They come clean, but you're still going to get some initial wear. Anything that's machined is going to have a sharp edge. Once that wears down, that ends up in the oil. You want to get that out of there. If you it out earlier, it's better. The suspension will last a lot longer and work a lot better."

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i usually do the break in ride and maybe one or two more before i get the suspension revalved/new springs for that reason, otherwise i'd do it right away.

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