Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

Do you use a steering stabilizer for motocross?

Recommended Posts

I really wanted to start a poll, but I either don't have permission, or I don't know how....

Anyways, do you use a stabilizer for motocross? Yes? No? Why or why not?

Thanx ahead of time....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes i have one on my bike but i usually run enduros but i leave it one for motocross also.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used them for hare scrambles and enduros. I don't like the slow steering feeling from them, but will take the trade off when hitting stumps, rocks and roots. Since motocross tracks don't have those, I take it off. The faster steering helps when I want to change lines mid way through a corner, or scrub speed on a jump face.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I do and it is great. I only ride/race mx. With the Scotts damper you can dial out all of the low speed damping that makes the steering feel slow and just run the high speed to cut out headshake. You could not tell my bike has a steering damper on it from the feel, but when you need it you sure can. On slower, tight tracks it makes no difference, but that's good because it doesn't get in your way. For fast tracks with chop and rough lines it saves so much energy, I won't ride without it again. It will be extremely helpful next month at the Vet Nationals at Glen Helen where it is so rough it is ridiculous. I wish I'd had one the other years I raced there, but I've got it this year and can't wait. Here's a pic of it on my '05 CRF450:

crfscott1.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How's that low mount working out for you? Are there times where you wish you had it within reach for more on-the-fly adjustments?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
How's that low mount working out for you? Are there times where you wish you had it within reach for more on-the-fly adjustments?

No, because I only use it for one type of riding, and once I got it set where I liked it I was done. If you ride offroad with some slow tight trails and then 70mph fast stuff I could see wanting to adjust on the fly, but not for mx. Once it is set where you like it, you're good to go. So for me the low mount is perfect, out of the way and I can run any bar/clamp combo I want.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good point. I've been on the fence about which mount to go with - and now that you mention it, when the hell would I have time to adjust it while zipping around the track? :banghead:

So you're essentially running only the high speed circuit on hardpack, correct?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do not have one on my bike. But at the track one day, i got off my bike and on to another KX250F with a Scott damper. I did notice a hell of a difference. The bike with the stabilizer ate up the stuff that would usually almost jerk the bars out of my hands. I was riding on a fast, hard pack track with some pot holes and rocks. If i could afford one, there would definately be one on my bike,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I feel your pain. My practice area is solid adobe with loose gravel on top and lots of sharp rocks sticking out everywhere - my RM eats Dunlop 952s like nobody's business. The front end of my bike is way too light and is getting kicked around too much for my liking, and I think a used Scott damper in need of a rebuild might be the way to go in the short term.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I race with a Scotts and it definitley saves energy on a fast or rough track. Less arm pump. But the biggest benifit is that it has saved my arse a couple of times. One time in particular, I was in the lead starting the last lap. 2nd had been closing the gap for three laps and was right on my tail. He went for an inside pass over a jump where I crowded the inside line and he landed on me. I think his bar hit me in the back. Anyway my chest slammed down on the bars and my head almost hit the front fender. I was draped over the bars big time. The front end oscillated a bit a couple of times but I rode it out. I'm sure that without the damper the bars would have went to the stops and I would have been spit off the high side on a 3rd gear landing.

BTW, I've got the bar mount and a custom made pad to cover the damper. I always run it 12 clicks out and never need to re-adjust.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmmmm. Only necessary for high speeds. Guess if you don't plan on going fast in chop you don't have much use for one lol. I think what it comes down to is some people have a set of adjustment tricks that they can do to make their MX bikes more stable on 4th gear + choppy straights. Wheel true? Over tightening their steering nut, torque analyzing every bolt on their triple clamp and forks, etc... But those sorts of arts a beginning to fade with old timers who know &%$#@! their doing and the softer alloys get with new weight savings technology. Who can afford to replace all their triple clamp parts and steering bearings and front wheel rims and spokes every time their steering gets a little shaky at a place like Glenn Helen or horse power hill at washougal once the tracks been watered a few times and the sun comes out to really harden those bumps into major surprise obstacles at high speed? Yah, if you have the top end horse power you can rear wheel manual wheelie over them. If you have a terrific memory and can process edges around the bumps at a lightning fast pace and are as fit as a fiddle lap after lap, no need for it. But if you're old and saggy, and your reaction time is not mission impossible nano second fast, and you plan on actually going fast on a race track (I know, sounds like a silly idea to some),'and you can't afford to replace half a dozen parts looking for a steadier ride every time your bike gets torqued a little uneven, then why not make life a little easier on yourself?

Just asking, I haven't made this step yet myself. Yah, I'm waiting for some one to talk me out of dropping major lettuce on one of these. But there comes a point when your friends are asking you why you're going faster in the corners than you are in the straights. And I think that time begs the question of steering stability? Maybe? Talk me out of this. I'd much rather spend the money on a really cool helmet or graphics. Lol

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nope. Only seems necessary at high speeds

I am curious now what you guys consider high speeds. Over 40 MPH?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm curious.....Why are we resurrecting a post from 8 $%^& years ago?

I don't know anybody running a stabilizer on any mx bike. These newer bikes handle square edged bumps a lot better than they did 8 years ago.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Hondas come off the floor with one? Behind the front number plate? Or am I mistaken and that's for something else?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The Hondas come off the floor with one? Behind the front number plate? Or am I mistaken and that's for something else?

Yeah I'm pretty sure the newer Hondas come stock with a steering damper. I dont really know anything about that one specifically though

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My bad I guess, I thought Honda got rid of them. They seemed to be "all the talk" 5/6 years ago haven't heard a peep about them as of late.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...