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Wheelie Help!

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Not that I do wheelies because they are illegal...wink, wink! :banghead: But is there any secret behind shifting while in a wheelie?

The DRZ has to be one of the most balanced bikes on one wheel that I have ever rode, but once it hits the rev limiter, or I try and shift, she comes back down.

Any hints would be appreciated! :banghead:

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shift before you hit the rev limiter.... i like to start a wheelie in second and shift into 3rd about half way through the revs in second.... still haven't quite got the switch to 4th gear down... i think i'm waiting to long to shift

but shifting before the rev limit really helped me out

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Not that I do wheelies because they are illegal...wink, wink! :banghead: But is there any secret behind shifting while in a wheelie?

The DRZ has to be one of the most balanced bikes on one wheel that I have ever rode, but once it hits the rev limiter, or I try and shift, she comes back down.

Any hints would be appreciated! :banghead:

You have to be at the balance point with a steady throttle and simply pull up on the shift lever as you modulate the throttle. If you attempt to shift when you're not at the balance point, your front end will drop too much for you to be able to compensate with the throttle.

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Tubo... love your sig

Ted rocks! and happens to be someone I personnally agree with... :banghead:

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The trick is you have to learn you have a larger balance point then you think you do....... You will find there is a very large "window" which you can have the bike balanced in.

You are relying more on the motor and less on balance to keep you aloft. That is why you are hitting the rev limiter. You need to get it back a bit farther so when you shift it doesn't fall. Your shifts should be lightning fast too.

It took me a long time to become a master at these "black arts". After almost getting arrested I gave it up for the most part. Its like riding a bike though you never forget.

Anyways it takes lots of practice. Shifting on one wheel takes a while before it becomes second nature. You should pop it up on one wheel while shifting from 1st to 2nd. Or just pull it up in 2nd. Use balance more and motor less and shift at mid RPM ranges. Don't even get near the rev limiter.

Speed also makes you more stable and makes wheelies easier. You will find when you are in 5th you can go forever once you get good at it. :banghead:

http://home.earthlink.net/~natedog224/wheelie.mov

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I have aN 05 S AND I am just learning to wheelie. I think it is an important skill to have and not just because it is cool. I feel that is important to be able to at least lighten up the front end quickly to get over roots etc.

What is the best way to learn. On grass, dirt or asphalt. I have been practicing in a parking lot with full gear on of course. Any tips?

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its easy pull the throttle open and half way and let the clutch and dont be afraid.if you get afraid thats what goign to stop you. first thing get used to the clucth like hell. learn how to shift fast. once you get used to those 2 you can start to wheelie. if i think my front wheel is to high i dont use back brake, i just close the throttle. the when i am to low and want to continue, i open it again. you have to have fast reactions. i never do anything that i think it mitgh be scary. and for shiftin you can shift anytime during powerband pretty much. i dont pull the clutch all the way i think. i think i just pull it half way. cuz the other half is to dead . most of all it takes pratice. hope that helps.

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I have aN 05 S AND I am just learning to wheelie. I think it is an important skill to have and not just because it is cool. I feel that is important to be able to at least lighten up the front end quickly to get over roots etc.

What is the best way to learn. On grass, dirt or asphalt. I have been practicing in a parking lot with full gear on of course. Any tips?

Asphalt is smooth and makes for the best practice ground if you are learning to go for long distances.

Popping the wheel over obstacles is easy though. Just give gas and pull.

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I find it hard to wheelie my SM. I stunt quads and 50s. I bought the sm naturally to stunt but I have a hard time doing balanced wheelies. I can do power wheelie for about 50 or so ft then I run out of throttle in 1st. I like to do slow technical stuff so that's why I use 1st. It feels like the front end is heavy to me and by the time I can get to balance point its to late. I just need to practice and get more seat time as I only have about 300 miles on it.

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It feels like the front end is heavy to me and by the time I can get to balance point its to late. I just need to practice and get more seat time as I only have about 300 miles on it.
There are things that make the feel much better. For instance triple clamps that move the bars forward a bit and some decent taller bars make controlling a wheelie so much easier.

With stock bars it kind of has a point where it starts to just fall into the balance point. It will seem "heavy" until you hit that point. You just need to pop it up faster.

Like I said clamps and bars make it much more linear and life is easier.

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The trick is you have to learn you have a larger balance point then you think you do....... You will find there is a very large "window" which you can have the bike balanced in.

You are relying more on the motor and less on balance to keep you aloft. That is why you are hitting the rev limiter. You need to get it back a bit farther so when you shift it doesn't fall. Your shifts should be lightning fast too.

It took me a long time to become a master at these "black arts". After almost getting arrested I gave it up for the most part. Its like riding a bike though you never forget.

Anyways it takes lots of practice. Shifting on one wheel takes a while before it becomes second nature. You should pop it up on one wheel while shifting from 1st to 2nd. Or just pull it up in 2nd. Use balance more and motor less and shift at mid RPM ranges. Don't even get near the rev limiter.

Speed also makes you more stable and makes wheelies easier. You will find when you are in 5th you can go forever once you get good at it.🤣

http://home.earthlink.net/~natedog224/wheelie.mov

I was lucky enough to see that ish in person!!

:banghead::banghead: You're F'in gnarly, Nate.

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either no clutch, or be real, real quick with it.
No clutch.

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I disagree with so many comments on here.

Clutch is your friend, learn to use and abuse it.

You do not need to be doing balance point wheelies to shift. If I were you, I would do a little experiment...Place your foot under the shifter when you start your wheelie, and once airborne, the first time that you modulate your throttle, the bike will automatically shift up (if your foot is still where I told you to put it). I can first through 4th with the front wheel only 1'-2' off the ground. It is called a power wheelie and it is pretty easy, but you cannot wait until you are past peak power, you need power to be building.

True balance point wheelies are performed by very few folks. While I can sometimes wheelie a mile in 4th gear, I do not consider that a balance point wheelie as it is usually the wind balancing me and if not for the wind, I would not be high enough.

If you can do true balance point wheelies, you would also probably have no issues dragging you rear fender in first gear, as you would have very above average balance, and using the rear brake would be a non-issue. Of course, first gear is the most difficult gear to learn to wheelie as the gearing causes the bike to react more violently to small throttle changes.

I would suggest 3rd gear, slide back on the seat till you are touching the rear fender, and find a straight uphill. You will find that you can float em and get em up easier that way.

just my $0.02

mw

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This monthys DIRT RIDER has an article on how to do wheelies from an alleged wheelie expert. I was surprised that he said standing wheelies were easier than sitting, but I guess that makes sense, since sitting requires a higher wheel height. Interesting short read.

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I have been practicing a bit, then a friend (a doctor no less) told me about a school he went to last month. He showed me the video he took at the school. It was amazing. I am now enrolled for the November 18th class at Pomona Raceway.... I will definately post pics after the class.... should be fun.

a link to the school

http://www.ononewheel.com/

:banghead:

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a link to the school

http://www.ononewheel.com/

:banghead:

That looks like fun. But do you think practicing wheelies on a 120 hp street bike with a wheelie bar will transfer well to a 40 hp dirt machine?? Same skills I guess, just have to rev our little bikes alot harder.

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