Difference between an A Class/ B Class / C Class rider

Some friends and I were debating over what traits/skill sets separate the different class riders? How does one know (without participating in races in that class) what level rider he/she is?

Please enlighten us...

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you cant. A fast rider is not nec. a fast racer. I find my local district (d34) the "c" class alone is full of great riders. Usually if a person is a good rider, but not a racer they are prob "c" class. Very rarely "b". Racing is alot more then riding fast and it really is hard to be good.

An "A" racer flys into turns, flys out of them, and can do any obstacle. If you are ever on a track with a fast "A" rider you will def. know it.

Racing is a whole new game. Riding fast in practice is much easier because there arn't an entire group of riders in a close area. An A class rider is pretty much the fastest guy at your local track. The guy you watch and are like "wow, i didn't know you could do that!" B class riders are very fast as well. A c class rider will range in speed. THe top of the C class is pretty quick, sometimes can put in a lap about the same pace as a B rider but doesn't have the endurace to keep the B pace for the entire Race. Like KK2 said there isn't really a way to tell untill you race.

Racing is a whole new game. Riding fast in practice is much easier because there arn't an entire group of riders in a close area. An A class rider is pretty much the fastest guy at your local track. The guy you watch and are like "wow, i didn't know you could do that!" B class riders are very fast as well. A c class rider will range in speed. THe top of the C class is pretty quick, sometimes can put in a lap about the same pace as a B rider but doesn't have the endurace to keep the B pace for the entire Race. Like KK2 said there isn't really a way to tell untill you race.

Here in Canada we don't have ABC. We have: ProAm, Intermediate, Junior and Beginner. What do you think C would be?

junior

C riders range so much because very fast experienced racers are just comming off minis must race in c class. They stay in C class to qualify for Loretta Lynn's and other national amateur events looking to get noticed. B riders do the same thing. Top B guys do the same as top c guys to get looked at. In the A class you have 2 types. "Pros" and what we call "Pro novices". The latter are mid pack riders that move up in class from accumulating points. They never win and are not that good. Top local guys are either trying to improve to the pro level or are the best of the pro novice's.Most "pros" if good enough may qualify for a national event and have the privilege of being lapped the the best riders in the world. To be clear if you are over 18 and not getting a bike, parts and money you are headed for pro novice at best. Welcome to Motocross! :banghead:

To be clear if you are over 18 and not getting a bike, parts and money you are headed for pro novice at best. Welcome to Motocross! :banghead:

Yeah, just ask John Dowd. He never put a leg over a bike until he was 19.

I love when some movies have split screens of a C rider and an A rider going through the same section, and there is no difference. The C class can be extremely sandbagged sometimes.

A riders are the riders that have every aspect of riding down. they have to be perfect physical condition so they can race at the top f their abilities for an entire moto and not slow down. they go into coners like there isnt even a turn there and come out of it just as fast. B riders are still very fast and have to be in just as good physical condition. and have lots of bike skill. both A and B riders have very good body position and excelent bike control and one thing that hasnt been mention yet is they ride smart. they knw when to hang it out and when to play it safe. there are really two types of C riders. the top riders that are good but still ned to work on finding a little bit of speed but are still imprisive and need to improve on physical condition. then there are the c riders that are fast but just cant run the pase of the front of the pack.

The class system is something that always troubles me. As a C rider, I feel that I am actually pretty good. The only problem that I have is that I don't ride or race enough to be truly competitive. So when I do race, I end up getting smoked by some guy who is cherry-picking the C class just to boost his trophy collection. To me, the downside of so many sandbaggers in the C class is that is discourages guys like me from ever racing. It's really tough to go through all that you have to do on race day just to land in 7'th place.

I really think that there should be no points or trophies for C class. They should make it a truly beginner class. If someone really wants to be looked at for going pro and wants to be known as a top 5 guy in his district, they should be a A or B guy. Not that there is anything wrong with being the #1 AMA D? 250C guy, but I just don't think that will get you too many interviews with pro teams so why track it.

A guys are A guys, they know who they are and what they are doing. I feel that B guys should be able to hit all of the jumps and pretty much know what they are doing around the track. C guys should be a little sketchy. They should be able to do almost everything on the track, but definitely should not be hitting the big triple in the back. If you're a C guy and are able to Go Big, I feel that you're cheating yourself by racing against guys that you know you will blow away. You'll only improve if you race against guys who are better and can teach you things in the process.

There has to be something wrong when there are 30 guys in the C class and 2 in the A and 3 in the B. Can an entire sport really be made up of racers who all have the same skill set and all fall into the same class? Might as well just call them the Pro's and Lite classes and be done with it.

Just my opinion.

Please don't mix A guys with pros Please.( Don't give me the exception to the rule like John Dowd) You need to be blowing away local talent to even think about going to a national event. At the local level the A riders do 2 more laps than beginners! Have any of you been to a local race? I can hand pick 3 local 80" class riders that on an 80 will blow 90% of the A local riders away on there pimped out 450'S. If anyone doubts anything I posted here ask the narrator so he can hurt your feelings. like I said. If you are not under 18 and cannot win at the A level you are a lapper waiting to happen. Sorry, do hate the messenger hate the sport!

As far as cherry pickers go. I usually win or near win in vet c or 40 B I was right on this guy in second and was the only guy doing the double double section but this guy was flying. I was riding hard and he was gone. I did catch up as he tired at the end of 5 laps. the guy behind me went from 7 to 3rd and he was 20 sec back. Same thing happened in moto 2. I went to speak to him later. his friend told me he was a pro but he took off 2 years and now he is back! to make it worse he was 27yrs old! And no I did not protest. only mini dads do that. If I see him again he's going down believe that!

They need to have a D class with no points given, but some small trophies(for incentive) so we can get these guys seperated. Im in D11 and when it get packed you better be right up front or in the very back cause when these C guys get so tight they almost always wreck in the first turn. They have a D class in some rebel racing series but they are not associated with the ama here. I remember running the friday night series here and they would make some guys line up BEHIND the first row of riders cause the starting gate was so slammed. Its a mad house in the C class sometimes things should be looked at by the ama I think for this class. Some people want to race but when your starting out who wants to run a class with 30+ people when your new to the sport. Not everyone gets to ride or race every weekend and it could be intimidating to run with all those goons.

Class rankings are relative to the level of competition in the area, and not all districts of the AMA are equal. The best C riders in D-25 can connect every jump on most tracks and turn lap times that are within 5 seconds ( on a 2 minute track) of the average A or B rider. Its not fair to call a C rider a "novice" because they are more skilled than at least 70% of the people who own bikes.

The best B riders are about as fast as the "average" A rider. They may be racing B to maintain their amateur status for college sports, or to compete with other amateurs on a national level. They have the skills, natural talent and drive of A riders, but are typically younger.

The best A riders in D-25 are capable of making the main event at a national. We had four make the main at Lakewood. That's impressive by New Jersey standards, but laughable by California standards.

If you really want to know where you stand without racing, go to any busy track where sanctioned races are held. Print out a roster from the local sanction's website and see who you can catch.

California A feels like twice the speed of NY A

Class rankings are relative to the level of competition in the area, and not all districts of the AMA are equal. The best C riders in D-25 can connect every jump on most tracks and turn lap times that are within 5 seconds ( on a 2 minute track) of the average A or B rider. Its not fair to call a C rider a "novice" because they are more skilled than at least 70% of the people who own bikes.

The best B riders are about as fast as the "average" A rider. They may be racing B to maintain their amateur status for college sports, or to compete with other amateurs on a national level. They have the skills, natural talent and drive of A riders, but are typically younger.

The best A riders in D-25 are capable of making the main event at a national. We had four make the main at Lakewood. That's impressive by New Jersey standards, but laughable by California standards.

If you really want to know where you stand without racing, go to any busy track where sanctioned races are held. Print out a roster from the local sanction's website and see who you can catch.

hey sean havent talked in a while, we gotta meet up and ride sometime, my number isnt 10 anymore its 235 so keep an eye out

Class rankings are relative to the level of competition in the area, and not all districts of the AMA are equal. The best C riders in D-25 can connect every jump on most tracks and turn lap times that are within 5 seconds ( on a 2 minute track) of the average A or B rider. Its not fair to call a C rider a "novice" because they are more skilled than at least 70% of the people who own bikes.

The best B riders are about as fast as the "average" A rider. They may be racing B to maintain their amateur status for college sports, or to compete with other amateurs on a national level. They have the skills, natural talent and drive of A riders, but are typically younger.

The best A riders in D-25 are capable of making the main event at a national. We had four make the main at Lakewood. That's impressive by New Jersey standards, but laughable by California standards.

If you really want to know where you stand without racing, go to any busy track where sanctioned races are held. Print out a roster from the local sanction's website and see who you can catch.

Our fast local pros'

Jason Lawrence

Casey Clark

Jeromey Cook

Barry carsten

Chris Hunter

Ty Wallace

Tom welch

Adam blessing ( just up from :banghead:

David Ginolfi

Jason Harper

They are all I can think of. They are national level racers and local also and yes on a 8 lap race they hit lappers at lap 4-5!

But In Ca McGrath races Mamouth mountain so Your right! there are fast A guys everywhere. But the rest are well NOT.

If you want to know whos who just look up loretta's results in A and B classes. For future talent 60 and 80 class winners!

man can't wait to get my crf450 this weekend, next year i plan on racing the c class at byron and joliet..maby some at mt. carrol

The person asking about Canadian classes in comparison to AMA. The beginner and junior classes(Canada) are classified as Novice(D and C respectively) in the USA/AMA. The intermidiate in Canada is the "B" class in AMA, as far as the Expert in USA, I think it is transitional class before National Pro. The AMA "A" riders can smoke a lot of our pros(and yes national pros) in the CMRC and they haven't made "Pro" yet!! I have seen it, lots. A kid from Loretta Lynns comes up and smokes our guys and sometimes wins a tittle. A few names, Gavin Gracyk and Sean Hamblin and Josh Woods just to mention a few.

From experience, always sign up in a lower class when coming from Canada and riding in the States. That being said, we do have a few young guns that on equal playing field with the AMA classes. Darcy Lange, Dusty Klatt, Colton Facciotti and Kyle Beaton, these are just the West Coast riders that I know. There are a few East Coast riders.

I have a little dilemma regarding the classes, too. I am 15 and currently race schoolboy on my 250f at regional races, and at really local stuff, i race schoolboy and 125b. I have never raced b class outside of local stuff. I get top 2 in the b class locally almost every time. I have even won a few. I am racing arenacross this year(regionally) and am thinking about racing B AND schoolboy. Should I wait until next spring to start racing B regionally and just race schoolboy in arenacross? Or should I race B this winter in AX?....thanks for the help, i just dont know if it would be a waste of entry fee $$$ or not.

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