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GY200 Dual-Sport - JetMoto - Too good to be true?

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Very informitive thread guys!! I have been watching these bikes on EBAY for 6 months or so and have decided to purchase one before spring. Has anyone been able to plate these bikes for use on the streets in Illinois? If so, where did you purchase the bike, and how did you go about licenseing it?

Thanks, Brad

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I, too, have been researching these bikes for like two years now. My problem has to do with $$. I never have the $1000+ needed to purchase. Maybe I will just not pay any of my bills for one month....lol

I am glad to read that your JetMoto's have not blown up or fallen to 1000's of pieces (sarcasm) like the threads from the "uncle's friend bought one for his niece and it melted into liquid metal after 2 miles of riding..." or some other uninformed doomsday ramblings.

From someone who does not own one, but has researched them, from what I can tell, the ones to buy are maufactured by Lifan or Zongshen. Some of the other Chinese brands are clones of these manufacturers, and the build quality is suspect. One company that seems to have a decent bike is KPX. There is a site called www.tdhelp.com/kpx that details the purchase and ownership of the z-150 model from the angle of a person who purchased one on EBAY a couple years ago. I saw Jetmoto's on EBAY, and thought they were just clones of clones, but the two of you who purchased and wrote about them seem to have had a good experience with them. United Motors are well-regarded bikes from what I have read about, but their purchase price is a little steep for a GY 200. (On the other hand, be wary of the very cheap GY 200's, because if you read www.tdhelp.com/kpx he explains that not all the GY's are the same). Like I said, the ones that are rebranded Lifans or Zongshens seem to have the best reputations among these bikes, and Jetmoto is apparently a rebranded Zongshen or Lifan.

Yesterday, I had a revelation of bikes; the Lifan GY200 something or another. It was on EBAY and sold by two companies: Kolb-Motorsport and Hooperimports. It was expensive (relatively speaking, of course), but seems worth the extra few hundred $$'s. Does anyone have more info about these new bikes? I could not get any info from Lifan's US site, and the Chinese site did not help either. Both sellers say that the bikes are DOT and EPA certified, and both post pictures of this fact in their repsective auction. California legality is pending. Hooper's auction and their homepage www.hooperimports.com (I think) have a series of photos from a Lifan customer in South Africa who took one of these bikes for a high altitude adventure. The bike looks good, and seems to have the "goods." Anyways, if someone could fill us (me!!!) in, it would be appreciated.

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culcune, I see that you live in Arizona, so plating for you should be at least a little easier than the folks in California. That said, I'd stick with one of the brands that have been reviewed on this site. Namely, Yamoto, JetMoto, StarTeam. I can tell you in recap to my posts that I've owned many bikes in the past 20 years, including several Honda's, Artic Cat ATV, and others. There is nothing on my JetMoto that causes me undue concern. I've layed out the bike's weaknesses as I see them, and all are either tolerable (speedo cable), remediable (mirrors, plastic), or flukes (battery box, ignition coil). For the price, there is nothing that comes remotely close to this bike (and other rebranded versions). Mine has a genuine Lifan engine, as noted by the engine model number stamped on the block. It is the bike's biggest strength. I rode again today (only about 20 miles) and I continue to be impressed by the comfort and quality of this machine. Everything from the wheels and tires, to the brakes, controls and guages, levers, seat, starter, engine, etc. seem to be more than adequate for daily usage. Please remember, if you intend to fly over large jumps, race, or ride highly technical off road trails, you would want to consider something on the higher end. If you intentions are commuting at 55 MPH or under, and light-duty trail riding, I can't see a better alternative. I've only put about 300 miles on mine, and about half have been relatively "abusive", but so far I'm VERY pleased with the value. When I say "abusive", I mean moderate jumping, rutty trails, mud, water, hills, donuts, wheelies (well, kind of), and running with the Yamaha kids in the neighborhood. I have held my own in all regards and my bike is still right. Remember, JetMoto makes no claims that this bike will be plate-able in any state, so it is up to you to do your research before hand to make sure you can get her street-legal. My advice is to find out what the procedure is for getting custom bikes or kit bikes registered, and follow that. The bike does have all the necessary equipment needed for on-road use, it is just a matter of working with your DMV and insurance company. By the way, State Farm insured me for something like $85.00 per year without seeing it. NICE!

Good luck in your search. Keep us posted.

eric

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Thanks for the advice. Like I said before, I had honestly thought that Jetmoto were actually clones of clones, but you and RockyColo showed me that they aren't. My riding will be mainly street, and some desert sand roads, as I am 36 and probably too late in life to learn to jump over 90 foot jumps, or anything for that matter! I live in Yuma, AZ, which is very close to the Imperial Sand Dunes, but, again, I would probably ride my bike there just to watch the off-roaders ride the dunes as opposed to actually joining them. I'll keep reading your posts, and will be researching your old ones to get old advice, and most likely after taxes, will be placing an order for either a Jetmoto, or another (quality) product, with the low price.

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You're never too old :applause:

I'm 42 and bought my first dirtbike (WR250F) a year ago.

No, I won't be taking any 90 foot jumps, but there's a lot of awesome desert riding that would kill a clone, or even most dual sport machines.

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Thank you, WheelsUp for the encouragement. I saw one of those cool Warren Miller ski movies the other day, and he is still out there on skis at 76+ years old, so I shouldn't count myself out of my motorcycle riding years yet. I would like to buy one of the cheaper bikes due to their low prices and "newness." I have been told to buy a 10-20 year old "big 4" bike, but its going to need work on top of its purchase price, which will still cost more anyway. I will be commuting on pavement mainly, with an occasional sand road ride, so these Chinese bikes will fit my needs, and should cost under $1500 complete, on the road. When I gain confidence and a bigger bank account, I would like to get a more serious off-road machine, but if everything works out, should still have my Chinese bike to ride around town with. Thanks Ikneric and ColoRocky for letting us live vicariously through your experiences with your Jetmotos, and am glad to hear that someone's uncles best friends mothers boyfriends who bought "one of these" bikes and blew it up after 3 miles are not necessarily true stories.

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HELP: Rear Brake Pedal Adjustment

I know this ain't rocket science, but I haven't figured this Brake Valve Adjuster Nut/Bolt out yet.

In this photo of the Brake pedal, I have the pedal adjusted too high. Yet on the Brake Valve Adjuster Nut/Bolt, I haven't figured out how to adjust the embedded bolt to later allow lowering the brake pedal.

Anyone have a recommended procedure for the rear brake adjustment?

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It looks like the embedded bolt is fixed so you will first have to pull one of the pins out either clevis (which ever one is easiest).

>Remove the cotter pin from the adjuster bolt in the upper clevis.

>Spin the whole thing closer together until you have the lever where you want it.

>Re-install the cotter pin in the upper clevis. (I'd use a new one).

>Re-install the clevis. (If it uses a cotter pin use a new one).

>Adjust the brake lever height adjuster screw.

>Adjust the brake light switch (lower) if the light stays on while the brake pedal is released.

Just make sure that there is still some free play between the master cylinder piston and the pivot mechanism that engages it, so that the brake doesn't drag with the pedal released.

Hope that made some sense :applause:

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Thank you, WheelsUp for the encouragement. I saw one of those cool Warren Miller ski movies the other day, and he is still out there on skis at 76+ years old, so I shouldn't count myself out of my motorcycle riding years yet. I would like to buy one of the cheaper bikes due to their low prices and "newness." I have been told to buy a 10-20 year old "big 4" bike, but its going to need work on top of its purchase price, which will still cost more anyway. I will be commuting on pavement mainly, with an occasional sand road ride, so these Chinese bikes will fit my needs, and should cost under $1500 complete, on the road. When I gain confidence and a bigger bank account, I would like to get a more serious off-road machine, but if everything works out, should still have my Chinese bike to ride around town with. Thanks Ikneric and ColoRocky for letting us live vicariously through your experiences with your Jetmotos, and am glad to hear that someone's uncles best friends mothers boyfriends who bought "one of these" bikes and blew it up after 3 miles are not necessarily true stories.

$1500 (or less)and you can have a pretty good older Japenese bike that will also allow you to grow into it and not have to buy a new mount just because you learned to ride a little better.But both options have their good and bad points! It is just good now to have the option to buy a new bike for so cheap,not what I would do but I am sure a good option for some.:applause:

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Thanks for the advice. Like I said before, I had honestly thought that Jetmoto were actually clones of clones, but you and RockyColo showed me that they aren't. My riding will be mainly street, and some desert sand roads, as I am 36 and probably too late in life to learn to jump over 90 foot jumps, or anything for that matter! I live in Yuma, AZ, which is very close to the Imperial Sand Dunes, but, again, I would probably ride my bike there just to watch the off-roaders ride the dunes as opposed to actually joining them. I'll keep reading your posts, and will be researching your old ones to get old advice, and most likely after taxes, will be placing an order for either a Jetmoto, or another (quality) product, with the low price.

I think my fear was ordering one off ebay and wondering if it would actually arrive, have all the parts, or even startup. Eric's post here, helped me make that leap of faith. I found the experience enlightening and hearing the bike's first startup was a thrill.

I'm very satisfied with the quality of the JetMoto and wouldn't hesitate to buy another one. However, you might check what others are using in the sand for tires.

HondaMaint might be able to give us info on his Yamaha TW200's ridability in sand, since it has these really "Fat" tires, it may perform pretty good. I would think the dual-sport "DOT" stamped "6PR" tires on the JetMoto would wander quite allot in the softer deep sands.

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Never tried it in sand,not much in Alabama.But I can say it the muddy red clay I think the wide tire isn't the best.The thinner tires on my motocross bike cut more down into the mud better.But on dry and loose dirt or a leaf covered hill it is great.

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I want one of these for LA-Barstow-Vegas next year. I'll do a complete write up when I'm done. What's the number for the US distributor?

i wasnt aware that they were available in an on road version lol

skullhat

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YangTM 2006 model 200cc with aluminum perimeter frame.

Ohhhh those KTM colors gotta hurt! :applause:

Dirt_Bike_(RF-DB06A).jpg

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Steppin up Chinese Dualsporting another notch.......... :bonk:

Check out that wave rotor! :applause:

49.5cc,_2_Stroke_Dirt_Bike_(RF-DB03).jpg

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Hello all. I looked into the engine in both the JetMotos and Yamoto/KPX's and while some say they're the same engines, why does JetMoto state a lower torque rating than the Yamoto/KPX's? Even when converted, the JetMoto comes in with less torque and HP. I'm about to purchase one of the bikes and am torn b/t JetMoto and all of the others.

Steve

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Hello all. I looked into the engine in both the JetMotos and Yamoto/KPX's and while some say they're the same engines, why does JetMoto state a lower torque rating than the Yamoto/KPX's? Even when converted, the JetMoto comes in with less torque and HP. I'm about to purchase one of the bikes and am torn b/t JetMoto and all of the others.

Steve

Looks like the JetMoto web page needs correction. According to the owners manual that came with my 200cc JetMoto:

Cylinder Bore x Stroke: 63.5 x 62.2mm

Compression Ratio: 9.2:1

Displacement of Cylinder: 196.9

Torque Max: 14N - M+/- 10% 6500rpm

Also seat height is listed at 35 inches, but I measured it at 33 inches

Horsepower according to manual is: 11kW = 14.75 hp

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Steppin up Chinese Dualsporting another notch.......... :bonk:

Check out that wave rotor! :applause:

49.5cc,_2_Stroke_Dirt_Bike_(RF-DB03).jpg

Honda clone with a yamaha front fender, not bad.

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Steppin up Chinese Dualsporting another notch.......... :bonk:

Check out that wave rotor! :applause:

49.5cc,_2_Stroke_Dirt_Bike_(RF-DB03).jpg

Finally a not-so-ugly Chinese bike.

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HELP: Rear Brake Pedal Adjustment

I know this ain't rocket science, but I haven't figured this Brake Valve Adjuster Nut/Bolt out yet.

In this photo of the Brake pedal, I have the pedal adjusted too high. Yet on the Brake Valve Adjuster Nut/Bolt, I haven't figured out how to adjust the embedded bolt to later allow lowering the brake pedal.

Anyone have a recommended procedure for the rear brake adjustment?

It looks like the embedded bolt is fixed so you will first have to pull one of the pins out either clevis (which ever one is easiest).

>Remove the cotter pin from the adjuster bolt in the upper clevis.

>Spin the whole thing closer together until you have the lever where you want it.

>Re-install the cotter pin in the upper clevis. (I'd use a new one).

>Re-install the clevis. (If it uses a cotter pin use a new one).

>Adjust the brake lever height adjuster screw.

>Adjust the brake light switch (lower) if the light stays on while the brake pedal is released.

Just make sure that there is still some free play between the master cylinder piston and the pivot mechanism that engages it, so that the brake doesn't drag with the pedal released.

Hope that made some sense :applause:

Karlznet, Thanks for your input :bonk:

I followed these steps, and brake lever is just where I like it without any drag. It was the upper clevis, that I had not removed the pin from to make the adjustment.

I made a major mistake on reinstalling the cotter pin. I bent the ends in the same direction instead of spreading them in opposite directions. So after a test run, which became extended cause I was having fun practicing wheelies and table-top jumps, the cotter-pin must've wiggled its way out and I lost the clevis pin. Currently have a bent nail running through there until replacement pin arrives from JetMoto.

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