Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

Best ways to increase reliability or prevent future damage

Recommended Posts

Since I am getting some money from working, I am of course going to spend it on my bike. But I want to spend it wisely. Because I don't get to spend much on my bike besides maintence items. So I want to buy something that will increase reliability or prevent future damage. I maintain my bike pretty well. I changed oil every 4 hours with Rotella T synthetic and clean air filter no matter how long I ride. I would buy better oil like Mobil 1 MX4T because it has better anti-wear additives and probably keeps it's viscosity longer than Rotella T. But I can't afford to keep on buy $8 oil that I will keep on changing every 10 hours or so. So I need to buy an item that is below $100 that I can use throughout the bike's lifetime that will increase reliability or prevent future damage. So I have been thinking of buying a Scotts oil filter and a Sendec hourmeter. What do you guys think I should buy?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a torque wrench but it is 3/8. And I know I will need a 1/4 for my cam cap bolts when I have to adjust my valve but luckily my dad pays for my tools.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would say scotts and sendec. Scotts oil filter will filter much better, and can be used throughout the life of the bike (and if you get another yammie, that one too). The sendec will be easier to track oil changed. I go every 3 hours or so on oil changed (about 2 track rides for me.)

-Phill

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IF you want a part that will increase the life of the motor, get an aftermarket clutch basket. Reason I say this is after 5 YZs of my own that I have used a Hinson basket in. The stock basket wears pretty quickly and the flakes get into the oil. On the YZ (like the RMZ and KXF) the engine (top and bottom) and the tranny share the same oil. You dont want those flakes (from the basket wearing from my findings) to get into the top end say like the cam journals or clog up a screen and reduce the oil flow. Every YZ I have swapped the baskets went from having flakes in the oil, to perfectly clean after the basket swap.

Keep the oil clean! The tranny breaks down the oil very quickly. That $8 oil seems cheap compared to a $1300 motor. I run Amsoil personally and it is about $5.25 a quart dealer price. You can get the dealer pricing for $20 a year. I would suggest you look into it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

all the above and after you've installed the hourmeter, plan on replacing the valve springs after 50 hrs. That's good high rpm insurance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

An aftermarket clutch basket is a lot of money. When my cases were split I looked at it and it still looked like brand new. Granted the bike has about 60 hours on it, but still.

That is why you get a scotts. A good majority of the flakes get caught in the filter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Since I am getting some money from working, I am of course going to spend it on my bike. But I want to spend it wisely. Because I don't get to spend much on my bike besides maintence items. So I want to buy something that will increase reliability or prevent future damage. I maintain my bike pretty well. I changed oil every 4 hours with Rotella T synthetic and clean air filter no matter how long I ride. I would buy better oil like Mobil 1 MX4T because it has better anti-wear additives and probably keeps it's viscosity longer than Rotella T. But I can't afford to keep on buy $8 oil that I will keep on changing every 10 hours or so. So I need to buy an item that is below $100 that I can use throughout the bike's lifetime that will increase reliability or prevent future damage. So I have been thinking of buying a Scotts oil filter and a Sendec hourmeter. What do you guys think I should buy?

It's very dependant on your level of riding. If you are an advanced "Rodger rev limit" racer, you will obviously need a higher tier of weekly maintanance. On the other hand, "Larry low rev" weekend sport rider is not going to be needing to change his oil every weekend. The bottom line is CHANGE THAT OIL !!, and keep things greased. You do this to match your level of riding, a 250F will last a LONG time. In my 5 years of experience with the 250F's they are one tough platform of a bike.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i usually rev low, i change my oil every 8-10 hours, some of you will say its too long, but my oil comes out clean, i change the filter every oil change, i keep a clean filter in there always!!!

where can i find info in the hour meter?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Buy the Scotts filter. It does a better job than either the paper or the older brass mesh filters, will last indefinetly, and you will then have no excuse whatever for not having a clean filter with each oil change. It will pay for itself in less than a year anyway. Or, with the money youy don't spend on filters, you can buy better oil. Just a thought.

Otherwise,

Change your oil often (ten hours or less)

Clean your air filter AT LEAST every third ride or more, and oil it thoroughly with an aggressively sticky filter oil.

Stay on top of everything. Investigate every unusual or abnormal condition immediately. Inspect the bike regularly. Keep an eye on your valve clearances. Correct anything that needs it as soon as you can.

That's how you "increase reliability or prevent future damage" :banghead:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The dubach racing is somewhat of a ripoff. I got mine at sears for 20 bucks. No rpm, but not like I really need it.

You can also go on ebay and get the sendec that does hours and rpm's. The dubach is a sendec unit.

-Phill

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
all the above and after you've installed the hourmeter, plan on replacing the valve springs after 50 hrs. That's good high rpm insurance.

How do I replace the valve springs? Is the only special tool I need is a ValveSpring compressor? Should I bring it to a shop or can I do it? And I am a pretty good mechanic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...