Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

corner washout

Recommended Posts

Over the past weekend I was practicing loose corners. My front end will get caught up and I'll crash. Is that a lack of momentum in the corner, or typically bad form. I know ya can't see it, but just typically the reason. And what do I do to fix it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It could be bad form.......or lack of momentum. When i was practising at a local track it had rained the night b4 and it was muddy and my tires tread was set at hard to medium pack dirt and i kept washin out on some of the corners :banghead: . So i could also be the type of tire cuz i switched my tires to accommodate with the mud and no more wash outs!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can often save a front end washout by getting on the gas. That slides out the rear to balance the front end slide, and unweights the front to pick it up and back in. Weight the outside peg, push hard into the tank with your outside knee, and get on the gas earlier (about the time that you start worrying about washing out your front end). See how that works :banghead:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would think your putting to much weight over the front of the bike, thats usually why my front washes out

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had the same problem too, got a little more speed into the corner, now I got perfect traction and no washouts. At first it feels like your going to fast then once you get it down it just feels normal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jake155 I would think your putting to much weight over the front of the bike, thats usually why my front washes out

Aren't you supposed to lean forward to the tank? Or you just saying I'm too far forward? :banghead:

Thanks everyone will try it out this coming weekend.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had similar problem today in a turn ended up high siding, One guy said I was weighting the front to much and another said he saw my rear slip out. What I know is I am not smooth in the turn in that i am steering to much and probably over corrected and ended up high siding cause of over steering. My point it may help to go back to the basics slow and work up your speed again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Suspension could cause the fornt end to wash out, and tires too...

But you can still get the bike to not wash out, even with a pos tire. My bro has a 756 front tire that practally has no knobs (not joking) Still took that bike on the track and was taking the turns as fast as my bike.

Key is to lean the bike over and don't lean in with the bike. Rather sit up and lean the bike over. If you're doing a right turn, stand up comming in, lean the bike over to the right and sit down on the corner of the seat, far forward. Basically what I mean by sitting up is this: extend your right arm, bend your left arm. This will cause the bike ot lean over and you to sit up more.

-Phill

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

dont worry about weighting your front wheel to much, even if your suspension is to soft, try and componsate by transferring your body weight smoother and widen the arc of the corner.

the most important and difficult thing for cornering is front brake control, you must progressively applie your front brake coming into the corner so you keep smooth continuous tension on your forks, therefore your front tire. if you realise the front brake to early you cause your fork to rebound and upset this balance, and you change the steering angle of the bike.

you need to move your body weight over the front wheel as you enter the apex of the turn and realise the front brake simultaneously, this will keep your forks compressed and the bike settled. and then its just appling smooth throttle.

its all timing, so take it easy and try and be as smooth as possible with your movements, any abrupt movements upsets the balance of the motorcycle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i just notice you have a sports road bike, theres no better place to practice the technique i just mentioned with front brake appication, when you do it on a road bike youll understand easier what i mean

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll have to keep that in mind for next spring, its up for the winter right now. The road bike that is.

Someone mentioned suspension, if the forks are loose its a little harder to get that flow that mark mentioned? If the rebound on the forks were tightened will that help.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Forget bike set up and all that other stuff.

The key is when you get on the throttle. Start opening the throttle smoothly when you are ENTERING the turn. Don't wait.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You can often save a front end washout by getting on the gas. That slides out the rear to balance the front end slide, and unweights the front to pick it up and back in. Weight the outside peg, push hard into the tank with your outside knee, and get on the gas earlier (about the time that you start worrying about washing out your front end). See how that works :banghead:

You'll never be really fast in corners until you learn to control the bike while both wheels are sliding. Throttle control and peg weighting like Berkeman is describing allows you to control a washout by transfering the slide from the front wheel to the rear, and vice versa. If the front end is washing out very abruptly, its probably because you are squaring off the corner too much. Round out the arc of your turn so that the slide is more predictable. Figure 8 drills and riding in circles will help you learn to control a two wheel drift.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...