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Standing on the bike (without moving)

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Use the force Luke! Repetitions, Concentration, Focus

Your body is on the the bike but your mind is not! If you try to conciously do it doubt sneaks in and you loose your balance. If your mind is elsewhere (in the zone) your subconcious mind will keep you balanced as long as you need to.

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somebodyposted some tips on improving balance some time ago,

could be Mr 2ply?,

could u pls post it again pls,

:applause:

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If you want a technical explanation, go here:

http://www.tonyfoale.com/Articles/Balance/BALANCE.htm

And here's Graham Harris' manual (or part of it) that makes a few points on balancing, as well as other things that you might find interesting.

http://www.trials.co.za/training.html

And I would suggest this video.....if you just want to watch and marvel at the talent of these guys. It's awesome to see. No instruction, just demonstration.

http://www.videoxsports.com/balancingact4.html

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And here's Graham Harris' manual (or part of it) that makes a few points on balancing, as well as other things that you might find interesting.

http://www.trials.co.za/training.html

Cool article with some great universal advise. :applause:

The Worst Practise Error

Don't practise what you like; don't practise what you do well.

Practise your weaknesses to improve. Find something you can't do well eg. turning on a camber. Mark out a section that includes turning on a camber and practise it.

:bonk:

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somebodyposted some tips on improving balance some time ago,

could be Mr 2ply?,

could u pls post it again pls,

:bonk:

For awhile here in the Off-Road Techniques Forum and the 4-Stroke Trials Forum, I wrote many different tips that all centered around 360 degree balance including adding power and braking to the balance equation. These were attempts to explain something that I didn't really understand for many years though I thought I did.

One of the biggest obstacles to learning and perfecting balance is our "instinct" that tells us to "Hang On", hold the bike with a firm grip and steady it by squeezing the frame with boots or legs.

Not until I started riding with my boots and legs away from the frame and then trying to ride as if I had egg shells under my palms did I start to really learn what Balance and Riding "Centered" really meant. Ride as if you are balancing your dinner on your head and allow the bike to dance around under you. Do NOT let the handle bars push and pull you as they come closer to you or drop away from you. Just let your hands follow what the bars want to do and then keep all of your weight over the foot pegs.

Open your legs as you tip the bike right or left against one leg and then the other for the turns and feel where the handle bars want to be for the degree of turn you have the bike tipped for and the speed you are going. Never tip your head or any of your body into the turn. Higher speeds require more lean of the bike for the same turn, so learning how to balance stopped will help you make the tightest turns with less lean of the bike.

Downhills are a little difficult because in trying to keep all of your weight on the pegs, you must still reach the controls on the bars. Work at it until you can do it without falling into the bars. Get your head low and behind the triple clamp, knees rearward of your feet and your butt back at the tip of the rear fender... standing on the back of the pegs. On steep hills, your back from your butt to your finger tips will be flat in one straight line.

Go practice an easy ride and see how long you can keep the foot pegs between you and the changing center of gravity combined with the added force of acceleration and braking while your hands just hover over the bars, fingers open with just a light palm contact and ankles away from the frame. All the time, keep your upper body quiet while your legs, knees and ankles do the work. Don't ride with locked ankles as this will require you to start bending over at the waist to make up for the loss of the ankle joints.

Get this down and you have 95% of the skill you need to do anything you want on any bike. :applause:

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wow, 2ply is zen master...i have a bunch to work on now!

:bonk: Thanks, but I don't think so. What I described will set you up to then ask Dwight how to do the faster stuff. If you learn how to go slow and stay balanced, you will be ready to go fast and stay balanced too.

But again, ask people like Dwight about the fast stuff 'cause that's not my department.

Good Luck! :applause:

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I do it quite often for short periods at stoplights and stop signs on the street with

the KLX. Got street tires with 32psi in them on it now, QUOTE]

32 psi :applause: I run 15/20 Front/Rear on my 96 KLX650C and commute 92 miles roundtrip everyday - mostly fwy. Can't imagine running them that high.

Running only 15psi in the front tire on the freeway is not a good idea, unless you are just plonking along at relatively slow speeds.

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