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New DRZ400 owner in Ga

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Just thought I would say hi, being new to the board and all. Great place for info!

So, I traded my old Jeep for a 2000 DRZ400s yesterday. It looked fun so it seemed like a good trade. The only problem is I have never been on a motorcycle of any kind before. This could be interesting. I hope I survive!

The previous owner rigged it for off-road use only with some sort of suspension mod (???), a Yoshi pipe, new cams of some sort (again, ???), and some serious looking knobbies.

I read the FAQ and a lot of threads, but I really don't know what I don't know when it comes to the DRZ or motorcycles in general. Any words of wisdom? Any obvious beginner advice so I don't have to learn the hard way?

I suspect this rather tall contraption in my garage will turn into a full fledged hobby.

Anyway, just wanted to introduce myself as I have really enjoyed this site so far.

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Plan for expenses (levers etc) from learning on it. Get protection and learn in an open area. Don't get down if you drop the bike, you've discovered when you went too far and that's important. If you do go on the street, make sure your driving habits are presteen. IE looking in blindspots, using signals, etc. You don't want your mistake to have taken you and the bike out.

If you had a jeep, you'll know where to ride this. Until you are comfortable with throwing your body around on teh bike and what the bike does so when you do, don't go playing in difficult areas. Stay open until you are comfortable.

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Welcome to TT and the DRZ forum!!

If possible you might ask the previous owner for specific information on what mods he did. That'll let you know where you stand now with the bike. If the bike still has an automatic cam chain tensioner you need to change that out to a manual cam chain tensioner ASAP.

There are other DRZ owners in GA, maybe you could hook up with some of them?

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Welcome!

Here's some advice in the direction of low cost, no parts required, preventative maintenance, to get you started in the direction of getting your hands dirty.

This maintenance will save you a world of headaches, down the road...

-Check CS sprocket nut for correct torque, and remove and apply 'red' Loctite to the splines and threads.

-Grease your steering stem bearings with waterproof grease.

-Grease your Swingarm pivot shaft and rear cush link bearings with waterproof grease.

-Check your primary drive nut for correct torque spec, and apply 'red' Loctite.

Here are some helpful links with comprehensive descriptions of how to perform various maintenance tasks, as listed above...

Primary Drive Nut Maintenance

Swingarm Pivot Shaft & Cush Link Maintenance

Steering Stem Bearing Maintenance

There are many more upgrades you can do, and should seriously consider, which require the purchase of parts. But the above maintenance is a good place to start, and they are all tasks you can get at right away, without ordering parts. Although you would be wise to order the clutch side engine case gasket, if you plan on doing the primary drive nut fix.

These tasks will also serve you well with respect to familiarizing you with your bike, and how it's put together.

:thumbsup:

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Thanks for the information guys. Very helpful and informative. It really helps to have a place to start when researching. The stuff you all mentioned should keep me busy for a while. Can't wait for the first trip to the power lines!

Thanks again! :thumbsup:

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