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$10 tool for lowering the forks on a DR650

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Some of you guys have had success lowering the front end without using the $50 Special tool to get the damper rod out, but mine just kept spinning. So, I took one of my opened up forks to Home Depot with me today and spent about 30 minutes in the plumbing aisle and came up with a tool for less than $10 that worked perfectly.

Materials:

3/4" Brass pipe cap (threaded female) $3.19

3/4"x18" galvanized pipe (threaded) $3.96

Those two pieces would probably do it, but just to play it safe I added these to make a handle

3/4" to 1/2" galvanized reducer elbow $1.44

1/2"x6" galvanized pipe (threaded) $1.07

Total cost: $9.66

Picture:

garage.php?do=viewattachment&attachmentid=13366

Stick the end with the brass cap down in the fork and it fits almost perfectly into the top of the damper rod.

Much cheaper! :thumbsup:

Shane

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I got the bike back together Sat morning after finishing the lowering job. Went for a 100 mile ride on some twisty back roads. MAN this thing feels 50lbs lighter in the corners. I LOVE IT!

If you do any medium to heavy off roading I wouldn't recommend lowering, but WOW does it make a difference on the street.

Now I need to order the shorter stand so I don't have to park on slopes. :thumbsup:

93Hokie

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Good tip - too late for me though

Mine kept spinning also. I went to the local Suzuki dealer who said he had the tool. Turns out he had know idea what the tool was or why I would lower the bike. At any rate for some reason his impact wrench did get it off. I might not have let the compressor get up to a high enough pressure when I tried it. I finally made him get out his manual to show him the section specifically on lowering the suspension (he thought I was doing some crazy custom thing I came up with). No wonder he doesn't sell many of these bikes. He also thinks they are worthless pigs, which i would imagine slows down sales.

I love the lowered result. After respringing the back (set to 3" of sag) and putting a 15mm spacer in the front to add preload, I don't need the shorter kick stand. Feels like a different bike. Can't beat this global warming thing, been getting a lot of riding in here in western NY

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Good tip - too late for me though

Mine kept spinning also. I went to the local Suzuki dealer who said he had the tool. Turns out he had know idea what the tool was or why I would lower the bike. At any rate for some reason his impact wrench did get it off. I might not have let the compressor get up to a high enough pressure when I tried it. I finally made him get out his manual to show him the section specifically on lowering the suspension (he thought I was doing some crazy custom thing I came up with). No wonder he doesn't sell many of these bikes. He also thinks they are worthless pigs, which i would imagine slows down sales.

I love the lowered result. After respringing the back (set to 3" of sag) and putting a 15mm spacer in the front to add preload, I don't need the shorter kick stand. Feels like a different bike. Can't beat this global warming thing, been getting a lot of riding in here in western NY

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93hokie and Wybs, did you guys follow the manual to the letter when lowering the front and the rear? Do you really need the tool for loosening/tightening the rear shock adjuster ring? Any tricks or suggestions? Thanks.

-Mike

_________________________________

2003 DR650

2005 Yamaha Zuma 49cc scooter :thumbsup:

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I got the bike back together Sat morning after finishing the lowering job. Went for a 100 mile ride on some twisty back roads. MAN this thing feels 50lbs lighter in the corners. I LOVE IT!

If you do any medium to heavy off roading I wouldn't recommend lowering, but WOW does it make a difference on the street.

Now I need to order the shorter stand so I don't have to park on slopes. :bonk:

93Hokie

Hello 93Hokie

Is that a Corbin Seat on your bike ? If so how do you like it ? :thumbsup:

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"McIver"

That's funny!!!

Stinkyhelmet, I actually used a pair of adustable "channel lock" plyers on the rings and they worked perfectly. Let me know if you don't know what kind I'm talking about, and I can take a picture.

Mountain Road Madness, Yep, it's a Corbin. It is actually the one that is made for the larger aftermarket tank, but I bought it used ($90) so I couldn't pass it up. I wish it was the black one, but oh well, for that price, I'm not complaining, and the blue kinda matches the decals on the tank. It has about a 1" gap at the top front between the seat and the tank, but I will probably eventually get the larger tank, so I can live with it for now. As far as the seat, I love it. With the stock seat, about 2 hours of street riding and I was ready to get off of it for the day. I did around a 7 hour street ride one day last fall and was ready to go another few hours. It is alot more comfortable than stock. The first few times I rode with it, it wasn't that comfortable, but I got used to it FAST. One thing is, it is alot slicker than the stock seat. Sitting up close to the tank, it is narrow, but you can sit further back and get up on the wide part, so it gives you the flexibility to back and forth.

93Hokie

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93hokie and Wybs, did you guys follow the manual to the letter when lowering the front and the rear? Do you really need the tool for loosening/tightening the rear shock adjuster ring? Any tricks or suggestions? Thanks.

I followed the manual for the rear, although I also cleaned and regreased everything so it was a little more involved. After searching for the coil over tool and not finding one anywhere I made one. A peice of perforated strapping with a 90 degree bend at the end and a radius to roughly match the nut worked fine. Then I found a drag specialties tool for $15 which sucks. Try to do it by hand before you waste money on the tool (it is really not that tight if you have the wheel in the air). When you reassemble the spring, the kubalink instructions say to lube the spring/washer interface and the threads on the shock. If you do that the spring turns easily by hand. In the front I followed the manual except I added a 15 mm (about .6 inches) spacer to the top of the spring stack, that really firmed up the front end. I also think internally lowering the front forks should give better results than dropping the clamps on the forks. internally lowering it gives you more overlap in the fork which should make flex less and handle better. I just went for a long twisty ride last night and I love my "new" bike.

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Was following the manual to lower the bike....removed the sidepanels, seat, airbox, bolt on bottom of shock. Then move on to the bolt on the top of the shock and proceeded to strip the head :thumbsup:

I think I have two options:

1) remove the bolt but HOW?

2) Or, is it possible to flip the spring seat with the shock still bolted at the top? Can you loosen the pre-load adjuster lock ring enough so that the spring seat can be flipped....it looks like the spring seat has a slot cut in it. What do you think?

Thanks guys.

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You probably could do it with it still on the bike, but it's going to make it alot harder to do. I think that there should be enough clearance around the shock to be able to get it done.

:thumbsup:

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Usually if you use an air operated impact wrench it will spin fast enough that the inside damper won;t be able to keep up. Also I have had success by lossening the bolt before removing the forks from the bike and placing your weight on the front.

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That's funny!!!

Stinkyhelmet, I actually used a pair of adustable "channel lock" plyers on the rings and they worked perfectly. Let me know if you don't know what kind I'm talking about, and I can take a picture.

Mountain Road Madness, Yep, it's a Corbin. It is actually the one that is made for the larger aftermarket tank, but I bought it used ($90) so I couldn't pass it up. I wish it was the black one, but oh well, for that price, I'm not complaining, and the blue kinda matches the decals on the tank. It has about a 1" gap at the top front between the seat and the tank, but I will probably eventually get the larger tank, so I can live with it for now. As far as the seat, I love it. With the stock seat, about 2 hours of street riding and I was ready to get off of it for the day. I did around a 7 hour street ride one day last fall and was ready to go another few hours. It is alot more comfortable than stock. The first few times I rode with it, it wasn't that comfortable, but I got used to it FAST. One thing is, it is alot slicker than the stock seat. Sitting up close to the tank, it is narrow, but you can sit further back and get up on the wide part, so it gives you the flexibility to back and forth.

93Hokie

Thanks for the Info. :thumbsup::thumbsup:

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Thanks for the tip! Could this be used to remove the bottom bolts to allow fork oil draining, with the fork tubes in place? Would the oil drain completely?

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I suppose you could do that. I don't know how much of the oil would drain. I guess just one way to find out. Let us know how it works out. :thumbsup:

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if you want to get the majority of the oil out, it's best to remove the forks and pump the fluid out. it is a messy job too.

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