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Jetting your 2006 TE 510 (LONG)

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A few of my KTM regular customers have purchased 06 TE 510's and requested I work on their jetting. These bikes had the smog cans removed, the intake manifold vacuum port plugged and the carb vent hoses routed down the back of the engine and in front of the swingarm. The following options were all tested from 500 to 4000 feet in altitude and 50 to 75 deg F.

How to Performance jet your 06 USA 50 State Husky TE 510

Option 1 (least expensive) Most complicated due to BK mod (BK mod instructions found elsewhere on this site), pump set up and carb removal from bike.

Remove carb from bike

Remove the carb top cover

Remove the throttle stop; retain the collar and spring (Use a standard FCR MX needle set screw in place of the throttle stop (SUDCO P/N 021-727; cost $ 8.38 US)

Install a OBDVP needle clip position 5 from the top (Yamaha P/N 5BE-14916-DP-00; cost $12.12US); followed by the collar, spring and finally the Needle set screw.

Reinstall the carb top cover

Remove the black Cover from the rt side of the carb; if the small silver cover is still in place over the end of start adjustment screw carefully remove it using needle nose pliers. If this cover/spacer is left in place the AC pump will not work.

Do the BK mod and set the AC pump timing to just under 1 second. Check that the pump squirt just misses the slide when opened: adjust the pump start adjusting screw if necessary. Replaced the Black side cover. Drain fuel from float bowl.

Remove the large (17mm) float bowl Jet access bolt:

Remove the stock 50 Pilot jet and install a 45 pilot jet if below 65 deg F: if above 65 deg F use a 42 Pilot jet

Set the fuel screw to 1.0 turns out from the closed position (45 PJ); 1.5 turns out (42PJ)

Install a 182 main jet (SUDCO P/N 019-154). (Note stock is 180)

Reinstall the float bowl

Reinstall Carb

Cost:

Needle set screw (SUDCO P/N 021-787) $8.38

Yam (5BE-14916-DP-00) Needle $12.12

Pilot jet SUDCO P/N 019-009 (45) or 019-008 (42) $4.45 ea.

Main jet 182 (SUDCO P/N 019-154) $4.45

Total $29.40

Option 2 Least complicated a little more expensive.

Remove the black Cover from the carb rt. side; if the small silver cover is still in place over the end of start adjustment screw carefully remove it using needle nose pliers. If this cover/spacer is left in place the AC pump will not work. Replace the Black rt. side cover.

Rotate carb to gain access to the top and the bottom

Remove the carb top cover

Remove the throttle stop; retain the collar and spring (Use a standard FCR MX needle set screw in place of the throttle stop (SUDCO P/N 021-727; cost $ 8.38 US)

Install a OBDVP needle clip position 5 from the top. (Yamaha P/N 5BE-14916-DP-00; cost $12.12 US), Followed by the collar, spring and finally the Needle set screw.

Reinstall the carb top cover

Drain the fuel from the carb

Remove the float bowl. You must remove the fuel screw its spring, washer and “O” ring before you can remove the float bowl--do not loose these small parts. Then remove the small dummy accelerator pump jet (AKA Leak Jet) from the bottom of the float bowl. Install a #60 Accelerator Pump Jet (SUDCO P/N 019-760 $8.80 US).

Remove the stock 50 Pilot jet and install a 45 pilot jet if below 65 deg F: if above 65 deg F use a 42 Pilot jet

Install a 182 main jet (SUDCO P/N 019-154). (Note stock is 180)

Reinstall the float bowl

Reinstall the fuel screw spring, washer and “O” ring

Set the fuel screw to 1.0 turns out from the closed position (45 PJ); 1.5 turns out (42PJ)

Rotate carb back to stock location and tighten clamps

Cost: Needle set screw (SUDCO P/N 021-787) $8.38

Yam (5BE-14916-DP-00) Needle $12.12

Pilot jet SUDCO P/N 019-009 (45) or 019-008 (42) $4.45 ea.

Accelerator pump jet (AKA leak jet) $8.80

Main jet 182 (SUDCO P/N 019-154) $4.45

Total $38.20

Option 3 A little more expensive same complexity as Option 2--More flexibility

Remove the black Cover from the carb rt. side; if the small silver cover is still in place over the end of start adjustment screw carefully remove it using needle nose pliers. If this cover/spacer is left in place the AC pump will not work. Replace the Black rt. side cover.

Rotate carb to gain access to the top

Remove the carb top cover

Remove the throttle stop; retain the collar and spring (Use a standard FCR MX needle set screw in place of the throttle stop (SUDCO P/N 021-727; cost $ 8.38 US)

Purchase a JD jetting kit for the 2006 Husqvarna 450/510 (P/N JDHQ03) and follow the directions for your bike.

Cost: Needle set screw (SUDCO P/N 021-787) $8.38

JD jetting kit (JDHQ03) $69.95

Total $78.33

JD Jetting can be found at: http://jdjetting.com/

SUDCO can be found at: http://www.sudco.com/

Remember the JD kit comes complete with two custom triple taper needles, a 42 Pilot Jet, a #60 leak Jet, 4 Main Jets and most importantly jetting instructions for varying conditions, and JD support. Because of this OPTION 3 is the BEST in this group for the general user population. However, all of the options work very well in the 06 510.

NOTES

If its cold outside you want to go with the larger 45 Pilot jet. (Stock is 50)

Some dealers are removing the throttle stop and the small Silver Accelerator Pump inhibitor prior to delivery. On the bikes I have jetted this was not the case so you must first check yours before proceeding.

The Yamaha OBDVP needle falls between the JD BLUE and RED needles and is closer to the RED. It is a single taper needle and provides a very good response in the Husky 510 motor. The DVP needle will require slightly larger main jets than the JD needles, due to its larger diameter near the tip. The JD RED an excellent performer and due to its custom multiple tapers tends to have a little more upper mid range pull—but due to atmospheric conditions either could be the best choice on a given day and I use both in FCR applications depending on the prevailing conditions.

Properly jetted the 510 rips but I wish it had a wider 5 and 6th gear as I ride a lot of street to get to the closest fire roads and trails otherwise I would probably switch over but my plated 04 570 KTM EXC still works pretty darn good.

Cheers

Clark

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I did option 3 on my '05 and a slight variation of option 2 on the '06. Both rip.

Adjusting the accelerator pump is really important.

To little or to much - both give the bike a stutter when ya wack the throttle...

Just want to say thanks for taking the time to write that. Consice. Clear. Great advice...

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fantastic great post thank you. I would recommend an Extended Fuel Screw for field adjustments

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A few of my KTM regular customers have purchased 06 TE 510's and requested I work on their jetting. These bikes had the smog cans removed, the intake manifold vacuum port plugged and the carb vent hoses routed down the back of the engine and in front of the swingarm. The following options were all tested from 500 to 4000 feet in altitude and 50 to 75 deg F.

How to Performance jet your 06 USA 50 State Husky TE 510

Option 1 (least expensive) Most complicated due to BK mod (BK mod instructions found elsewhere on this site), pump set up and carb removal from bike.

Remove carb from bike

Remove the carb top cover

Remove the throttle stop; retain the collar and spring (Use a standard FCR MX needle set screw in place of the throttle stop (SUDCO P/N 021-727; cost $ 8.38 US)

Install a OBDVP needle clip position 5 from the top (Yamaha P/N 5BE-14916-DP-00; cost $12.12US); followed by the collar, spring and finally the Needle set screw.

Reinstall the carb top cover

Remove the black Cover from the rt side of the carb; if the small silver cover is still in place over the end of start adjustment screw carefully remove it using needle nose pliers. If this cover/spacer is left in place the AC pump will not work.

Do the BK mod and set the AC pump timing to just under 1 second. Check that the pump squirt just misses the slide when opened: adjust the pump start adjusting screw if necessary. Replaced the Black side cover. Drain fuel from float bowl.

Remove the large (17mm) float bowl Jet access bolt:

Remove the stock 50 Pilot jet and install a 45 pilot jet if below 65 deg F: if above 65 deg F use a 42 Pilot jet

Set the fuel screw to 1.0 turns out from the closed position (45 PJ); 1.5 turns out (42PJ)

Install a 182 main jet (SUDCO P/N 019-154). (Note stock is 180)

Reinstall the float bowl

Reinstall Carb

Cost:

Needle set screw (SUDCO P/N 021-787) $8.38

Yam (5BE-14916-DP-00) Needle $12.12

Pilot jet SUDCO P/N 019-009 (45) or 019-008 (42) $4.45 ea.

Main jet 182 (SUDCO P/N 019-154) $4.45

Total $29.40

Option 2 Least complicated a little more expensive.

Remove the black Cover from the carb rt. side; if the small silver cover is still in place over the end of start adjustment screw carefully remove it using needle nose pliers. If this cover/spacer is left in place the AC pump will not work. Replace the Black rt. side cover.

Rotate carb to gain access to the top and the bottom

Remove the carb top cover

Remove the throttle stop; retain the collar and spring (Use a standard FCR MX needle set screw in place of the throttle stop (SUDCO P/N 021-727; cost $ 8.38 US)

Install a OBDVP needle clip position 5 from the top. (Yamaha P/N 5BE-14916-DP-00; cost $12.12 US), Followed by the collar, spring and finally the Needle set screw.

Reinstall the carb top cover

Drain the fuel from the carb

Remove the float bowl. You must remove the fuel screw its spring, washer and “O” ring before you can remove the float bowl--do not loose these small parts. Then remove the small dummy accelerator pump jet (AKA Leak Jet) from the bottom of the float bowl. Install a #60 Accelerator Pump Jet (SUDCO P/N 019-760 $8.80 US).

Remove the stock 50 Pilot jet and install a 45 pilot jet if below 65 deg F: if above 65 deg F use a 42 Pilot jet

Install a 182 main jet (SUDCO P/N 019-154). (Note stock is 180)

Reinstall the float bowl

Reinstall the fuel screw spring, washer and “O” ring

Set the fuel screw to 1.0 turns out from the closed position (45 PJ); 1.5 turns out (42PJ)

Rotate carb back to stock location and tighten clamps

Cost: Needle set screw (SUDCO P/N 021-787) $8.38

Yam (5BE-14916-DP-00) Needle $12.12

Pilot jet SUDCO P/N 019-009 (45) or 019-008 (42) $4.45 ea.

Accelerator pump jet (AKA leak jet) $8.80

Main jet 182 (SUDCO P/N 019-154) $4.45

Total $38.20

Option 3 A little more expensive same complexity as Option 2--More flexibility

Remove the black Cover from the carb rt. side; if the small silver cover is still in place over the end of start adjustment screw carefully remove it using needle nose pliers. If this cover/spacer is left in place the AC pump will not work. Replace the Black rt. side cover.

Rotate carb to gain access to the top

Remove the carb top cover

Remove the throttle stop; retain the collar and spring (Use a standard FCR MX needle set screw in place of the throttle stop (SUDCO P/N 021-727; cost $ 8.38 US)

Purchase a JD jetting kit for the 2006 Husqvarna 450/510 (P/N JDHQ03) and follow the directions for your bike.

Cost: Needle set screw (SUDCO P/N 021-787) $8.38

JD jetting kit (JDHQ03) $69.95

Total $78.33

JD Jetting can be found at: http://jdjetting.com/

SUDCO can be found at: http://www.sudco.com/

Remember the JD kit comes complete with two custom triple taper needles, a 42 Pilot Jet, a #60 leak Jet, 4 Main Jets and most importantly jetting instructions for varying conditions, and JD support. Because of this OPTION 3 is the BEST in this group for the general user population. However, all of the options work very well in the 06 510.

NOTES

If its cold outside you want to go with the larger 45 Pilot jet. (Stock is 50)

Some dealers are removing the throttle stop and the small Silver Accelerator Pump inhibitor prior to delivery. On the bikes I have jetted this was not the case so you must first check yours before proceeding.

The Yamaha OBDVP needle falls between the JD BLUE and RED needles and is closer to the RED. It is a single taper needle and provides a very good response in the Husky 510 motor. The DVP needle will require slightly larger main jets than the JD needles, due to its larger diameter near the tip. The JD RED an excellent performer and due to its custom multiple tapers tends to have a little more upper mid range pull—but due to atmospheric conditions either could be the best choice on a given day and I use both in FCR applications depending on the prevailing conditions.

Properly jetted the 510 rips but I wish it had a wider 5 and 6th gear as I ride a lot of street to get to the closest fire roads and trails otherwise I would probably switch over but my plated 04 570 KTM EXC still works pretty darn good.

Cheers

Clark

Curious..............

Is the JD "Red" Needle the same one for all applications? I am curious if the "Red" Needle for my Husky is the same as the one for my Wife's Honda??

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"Remove the throttle stop; retain the collar and spring (Use a standard FCR MX needle set screw in place of the throttle stop (SUDCO P/N 021-727; cost $ 8.38 US)"

Is this $8 screw strictly necessary?

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lairpost

The expensive "screw" is a machined part that has the recess at the bottom to accept the spring, is the proper height to not limit throttle opening, and has a 4mm allen cut in the top. It is more than just a screw. If you think its expensive from SUDCO just try purchasing it from a OEM like KTM, Honda, etc. and it will be double the price.

Some have tried to cut down the throttle stop but it is hard to do for the following reasons: get it low enough to allow full throttle slide opening and still be able to cut a slot in whats remaining of it for removal installation etc.

This post was based on US 50 state models and I do not know if the throttle stop is used elsewhere. Also as noted some dealers are removing the throttle stop and providing the screw.

CowboyBob

The question on JD's needle tapers between kits should be addressed to James Dean via his web site or call the number listed there and ask. Make sure you have the specifices as to which RED needle kit you want to try out in another application. JD puts a lot of time into the development and testing of bike specific kits so go to the source.

Cheers

Clark

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Thanks Clark, the cost of the screw is not a big deal, just getting one...I'll try my dealer first.

Thanks for the very useful post by the way! This is the kind of info that keeps me coming back to TT.

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Good job Clark

RE the question above are all JD reds the same, answer is no? A JD red for a Husky with and 39 to 41 mm FCR carb is the same as a KTM with an 39 to 41mm FCR, might be the same as a Honda with a 39 to 41mm FCR? But thre are definatly other models that use other diameters tapers etc. In principle Blue is the start point, Red is one step leaner to try after blue has proven to be too rich

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Dave,

I have heard to start with the Blue many times, but I used the Red Needle on my 450 because for my elevation and tempature range. The needle is supposed to affect low to midrange. I definatly noticed better response in the Midrange with the Red needle, even with the Tempature right at 50%. Most of the time I ride in Temps > 60%.

Should I even mess with the Blue Needle?

Another topic,

Also, someone said not to use the Hardened Anodized Fuel Screw? Does it wear out prematurly? Better to go with Brass?

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Good job Clark

RE the question above are all JD reds the same, answer is no? A JD red for a Husky with and 39 to 41 mm FCR carb is the same as a KTM with an 39 to 41mm FCR, might be the same as a Honda with a 39 to 41mm FCR? But thre are definatly other models that use other diameters tapers etc. In principle Blue is the start point, Red is one step leaner to try after blue has proven to be too rich

Interesting.

I tend to keep all my Carb Parts in the same plastic box, I guess I better label things?

You gotta hand it to JD. If the Carb Kit consisted of "off the shelf" parts, they would have sold exactly 1 Kit to a guy with a computer and the word would have gotten out. Instead, they supply Needles that have no ID other than a dab of paint, again they DID do all the work so nothing wrong with that at all.

I find it hard to believe that there is no "off the shelf" Needle to do the job, or that some clever machinist with an optical comparator has not spent his Lunch Hour...........anyway................

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Clark: Have you considered a similar jetting exercise for the 610E &/or SM?

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I am adding this jewel by Clark that he posted in the AP thread:

"The objective in all these mods is to reduce the amount of raw fuel in the Pump squirt to just that needed to allow the engine to overcome a lean condition when the throttle is opened rapidly. You want the engine to always run on perfectly metered fuel and without fuel injection and its associated computer the closest to perfectly metered fuel is when the carb is operating on its internal jetting and that jetting is close for your current riding conditions. The Pilot circuit, Needle and and main jet circuits.

When the throttle is opened rapidly the lighter air responds almost instantly to start filling the cylinder the heaver fuel in the carb float bowl lags behind so the engine goes lean real fast and you get a bog before the fuel catches up. The pump squirt tries to overcome this lean condition with a shot of raw fuel. You want to time this shot to be the proper duration and volume for you riding conditions.

The FCR carb when it first was mass utilized on 4 stroke dirt oriented bikes (AKA 98 Yam 400) along with a few other carbs of that vintage incorporated a Accelerator Pump (AC) to provide the fuel shot or squirt. The idea is OK but the implementation needed refining. On the 400 Yams and current generation bikes the AC squirt was way to long and resulted in a rich condition, however, if you went to higher RPMs and stayed there for a few seconds or minute or so it would not be apparent. On the other hand if you are trail riding and constantly adjusting the throttle--every time you opened the throttle a little extra fuel was shot into the cylinder and it was not needed as the throttle was not rapidly opened and it leads to a rich condition the bike starts loading up becomes sluggish etc. The smaller displacement bikes running larger carbs to support their high rpm requirements are very prone to loading up in the lower rpm range as they do not move as much air then and load up rapidly stall and then become very very difficult to start.

This is where starting to fiddle with the AC pump on the dirt oriented FCR carb started.

The objective to match the AC pump squirt to the needs and no more. The BK mod was developed, the P-38 lightening (AC pump bowl) was developed, and use of different AC pump diaphragms (the diaphragms had different length stand-offs on the bottom side). Later a second section to the AC pump squirt path was incorporated into the float bowl which allowed a portion of the fuel to be returned to the float bowl. The amount to be returned is controlled via a AC pump JET (AKA LEAK Jet). If you install a very small pump jet the squirt is long in duration and if you install a large jet there is hardly any squirt at all.

The BK mod adds a second adjustment screw which stops the pump rod downward motion limiting the amount the AC pump diaphragm can move and mechanically shortens the pump stroke shortening the squirt.

The "HONDA Diaphragm" is just the HONDA part number for a AC pump rebuild kit which has in it a Pump diaphragm with a longer stand off on the bottom. The diaphragm in the HONDA kit has a 9mm standoff and it to mechanically limits the pump stroke by bottoming in the AC pump bowl sooner than the OEM provided diaphragm. Since it bottoms sooner the AC pump squirt is again shortened.

The P-38 lightening replacement AC pump bowl has a taller standoff machined into the bowl itself and shortens the pump squirt by limiting the downward motion of the OEM provided diaphragm.

So whats the difference? All the 4 strokes require a somewhat different AC pump shot. The BK mod allows adjust ability for fine tuning the shot so is more flexible than the other mechanical methods.

Using the AC pump diaphragm from the HONDA kit limits the pump shot to approx 2 seconds (I think it is still too long) much better but not adjustable for fine tuning for different bikes.

The P-38 AC pump bowl had different length standoffs machined into the replacement bowl for different models so a little better than the HONDA diaphragm but not as flexible as the BK mod.

Never use the "Honda" Diaphram along with one of the replacement AC pump bowls (P-38, Quick Shot, etc) or you may end up wiht NO AC pump operation.

Using a properly sized LEAK jet is the best option IF YOUR CARB FLOAT bowl has been drilled and taped for the leak jet.

The advantage to the leak jet is that 1) it is adjustable via different sizes (but once you get the correct size you will probably never change it again). 2) it is more flexible than any of the mechanical stops because it will continue to work from partial throttle opening (where you may already be up against the mechanical stop of the other methods mentioned) and you whack the throttle say from 3/8 to WTO, etc. 3) in addition when trail riding at low throttle settings and you are working the throttle but not rapidly a properly sized LEAK jet will return the majority of the fuel to the bowl and not into the intake and will NOT load up the engine. This is VERY VERY important and even more so as the bike displacement gets SMALLER.

The newer Huskys with the FCR carb are drilled and tapped for a leak jet but have a dummy jet installed which can be removed and replaced with a real leak jet. Some have drilled out the dummy jet to approximate a (60 to 70) sized leak jet. None of the OEM KTM provided FCR's so far have the leak jet capability and if you want it you must change the float bowl, and this is why the 250 SX-F can be a real pain as it loads up easily and will be a real bear to start afterwords.

Again for Huskys the JD kit provides all the stuff you need including the LEAK jet--and is the painless way to go IMHO.

Cheers

Clark"

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Clark: Have you considered a similar jetting exercise for the 610E &/or SM?

Clark, Thanks for sharing the very good info. Informative and well written. I'm about to try and adjust my piped SM610 and am going to use your 510 data as a baseline. Have you any experience with the FCR on the sohc 576 motor?

JD red 510/450 needle is said to work well. Will probably try the Yamaha needle vs. stock, 45 -52 slow, 180-188 mains, enable the AP, BK mod or 60 leak jet, replace the throttle stop screw, etc... What am I forgetting?

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Remove the black Cover from the rt side of the carb; if the small silver cover is still in place over the end of start adjustment screw carefully remove it using needle nose pliers. If this cover/spacer is left in place the AC pump will not work.

Sorry, should have read the original post again. 👍

No good having a leak jet if the AC pump doesn't work. :bonk:

Hopefully the aussie models dont have this temporary emmission fix and have the right leak jet fitted as standard. 👍

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From my ancient experience emissionizing carbureted cars in the late 60's before EFI & computers, driveability always suffered because to get good emissions, the accelerator pump "pump shot" had to be cut back to almost nothing. The cars drove like crap. Even with the catalyst on the Husky, they had to eliminate the accelerator pumpshot to get the bike to pass emissions. I'm also convinced Husky uses the throttle position sensor to play with spark for emissions and drive by noise standards, but I can't prove it.....yet.

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Great info and thread!

I have had very good results with the Keihin OCEMN (in 39mm carbs)

and the OCEMM in the Husky 41mm carbs. This was on my 05 TE450 and will be using/trying the same on my 05 TC450 and 06 SMR450 (same motor as the 06 TE450)

Keihin Needles

To read the chart see the needle type:

ie N427 "OC" then go the the taper "E" (1 in degrees) then to the dimentions "MM" or "MN" = "OCEMM"

These were the magic needle befre te JD needles came along.

William

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