Husky weight comparison

Just for fun, a friend and I weighed our motorcycles and here are the results. All bikes are ready to ride but have empty fuel tanks. All have hand guards, larger tanks, steering dampers, skid plates and other minor accessories, excpet that the Husky does not have an aftermarket skid plate or steering damper:

Honda XR 650 2001 301 lbs

Husky TE 450 2006 276 lbs

KTM 450 MXC 2004 263 lbs

Honda CRF 250X 2005 248 lbs

Yamaha YZ 250 2005 243 lbs

All measurements were taken with a digital bathroom scale under each wheel.

Steve

Whoa that Husky 450 is heavier than I expected.

Yeah it is, but it doesn't feel so bad when you're riding it. I saw in the latest Dirt Rider magazine how much they complained about the TE 250's weight so I had to weigh my TE 450 and see the "damage" for myself. It's an honest 13 lbs heavier than my old KTM. I think I'm going to sell my CRF 250X and buy a used 250 2-stroke...

Steve

A 05 yz250 2 smoke is 243lbs? I thought it was lighter? Oh well

All of those weights seem a little high to me, I think it may be the method they were weighed. Was the scale just a normal bathroom scale? Did you weigh each tire separately then add the total? If so, and thats the way it sounds in the post. I would think you could not get a true weight that way. They would need to be weighed on a large scale like you would find at the post office or a large shipping company. Some type of scale that both tires would fit.

They call 'em Husky for a reason. :thumbsup:

All of those weights seem a little high to me, I think it may be the method they were weighed. Was the scale just a normal bathroom scale? Did you weigh each tire separately then add the total? If so, and thats the way it sounds in the post. I would think you could not get a true weight that way. They would need to be weighed on a large scale like you would find at the post office or a large shipping company. Some type of scale that both tires would fit.

Weighing the front end and rear end and adding the weights together does in fact give an accurate total weight, plus an added bonus of providing the front/rear weight distribution. If the bikes are level when weighed, and the scales are accurate, the weights should be close to the actual weights. In any case, the figures provide useful comparative info.

Did you weigh each tire separately then add the total? If so, and thats the way it sounds in the post. I would think you could not get a true weight that way.

you would be thinking incorrectly then. as long as the other wheel is the same elevation, the weight you get when you add them up will be as accurate as your scale. if you leave the other wheel on the ground, then you will end up with a slightly lower weight. physics is cool.

those weights seem pretty close to accurate to me based on what i've been reading online and in magazines that actually weigh the bikes. i think the latest dirt rider comes up with a similar figure for the 250x, and they had the husky 250 at 262 lbs or thereabouts. brochures all lie.

-mark

Steve, How do you feel fatigue wise after a day on your 450 compared to the 250X?

Steve, How do you feel fatigue wise after a day on your 450 compared to the 250X?

i'm not steve, but i don't notice any difference going between my 300exc and 525's i have ridden. i do notice a bit more fatigue on my 250sx, but that's cuz it's so freakin' fun to ride that i always haul ass at top speed through the twisties, rocks, whoops, sand, whatever.

imho, if you are a reasonably fit rider with good riding position who learns to steer mostly with the footpegs, fatigue should not be an issue except in the most extreme race circumstances. however, i think it's probably different for everyone. i find 250 4-strokes fatiguing to ride cuz at the altitude i live and ride (6500-9000') they are so gutless that they are no fun, and i get really tired really fast of having no fun. :thumbsup:

-mark

Just for fun, a friend and I weighed our motorcycles and here are the results. All bikes are ready to ride but have empty fuel tanks. All have hand guards, larger tanks, steering dampers, skid plates and other minor accessories, excpet that the Husky does not have an aftermarket skid plate or steering damper:

Honda XR 650 2001 301 lbs

Husky TE 450 2006 276 lbs

KTM 450 MXC 2004 263 lbs

Honda CRF 250X 2005 248 lbs

Yamaha YZ 250 2005 243 lbs

All measurements were taken with a digital bathroom scale under each wheel.

Steve

Thanks for the true weights guys. It would be cool to keep one thread going about weights with out any BS. Just facts and theories on the issue.

I've weighed two of my Husky's with the bathroom scale and it comes out almost to the lb. of what other guys have come up when weighing their bike now matter using what method. Most guys run exactly what you are running, the after market skide plate and the dampner are about all that might skew accessories comparisons/weights.

Mine came in at:

'04 CR125, w/o dampner, w/skip plate, W/cyra tripple clamp mounted probends, full of fuel, 220 lbs. Subtract 2.4 gal @ 6 Lbs. = 14.4 lbs, W/0 fuel

206 lbs.

I stuck with the 125, considered long and hard about getting a WR250 but they weigh in at about 245 lbs set up like I have the CR125. That almost 40 lbs difference and the WR250 would have been only 9 to 10 lbs lighter than my 510. The CR weighs under 200 lbs dry. It's amazing how light they are. I don't think you can ride a lighter full on dirt bike.

I'd love to get into a 230 lb. wet 250 2T though.

'04 TE 510, with dampner, no headlight (it weighs 1 lb but I do not run it), # plate, same cyras as above, stock tank, full of fuel 254 lbs. 2 gals or 12 lbs of fuel equals 232 w/o fuel. The '04s were much lighter than the '05s and '06s. Like 12 lbs minimum on the '05s and then even if you remove the smog and turn signals still picked up another 5 lbs or so minimum.

4t's just feel heavier than they are due to the rotating mass of the engine. The bigger the displacement the heavier it feels also. A 250 weighs 4 lbs more than a 450 but feels 10 lbs heavier. A 510 is 6 lbs heavier than a 250 and feels 15 lbs heavier.

I can ride the CR125 for 50% longer than my 510. I might not be quite as fast but I am still unsure of the speed isssue yet. I'm sure I'd be faster on the 510 in sand and open stuff but slower in the super tight wet stuff. depedant on terrain more than likely. the both are fun. If i was riding desert definatly the 510. Riding foot trails in the mountains, than I take the CR125.

If I had to only own one bike. I would get a 230 lbs wet 250 2T.

Not sure why no one else mentions it:

The TE is street legal. The weight of the horn, blinkers, flasher, wires and wire harness, brake lights, mirror, switches, license plate, etc. is significant.

A dual sported KTM or Yamaha or Honda will be very close to the Husqvarna.

Or--a striped down race ready Husky is leaner and meaner than meets the bathroom scale...

dyrtmon,

Regarding the fatigue caused by the Husky TE 450 vs. the CRF 250X: The Honda is a lighter bike and has a better stock suspension, but the power delivery doesn't suit my riding style as well as the 450 Husky. The Honda is less fatiguing mainly because of its superior suspension, but I'm sticking with the Husky which now has re-valved suspension that I'm still dialing in. Unless you spend a lot of time muscling the bike at really low speed I think the weight difference is less important than having good suspension, so far as rider fatigue is concerned.

Regarding the weight measurement issues: My bathroom scale is approx. 2" thick and this results in 1.8 deg tilt when measuring the weight on each wheel. This small angle causes approx. 2% error (reduction) in the weight on wheel measurement. So my bike should really weigh about 6 lbs more than I measured.

I also forgot to mention that My TE 450 has the turn signals removed along with all the emmisions crap.

Steve

So no TC450 poundage here ? thinkin of getting one :thumbsup: ..

Thanks for the true weights guys. It would be cool to keep one thread going about weights with out any BS. Just facts and theories on the issue.

I've weighed two of my Husky's with the bathroom scale and it comes out almost to the lb. of what other guys have come up when weighing their bike now matter using what method. Most guys run exactly what you are running, the after market skide plate and the dampner are about all that might skew accessories comparisons/weights.

Mine came in at:

'04 CR125, w/o dampner, w/skip plate, W/cyra tripple clamp mounted probends, full of fuel, 220 lbs. Subtract 2.4 gal @ 6 Lbs. = 14.4 lbs, W/0 fuel

206 lbs.

I stuck with the 125, considered long and hard about getting a WR250 but they weigh in at about 245 lbs set up like I have the CR125. That almost 40 lbs difference and the WR250 would have been only 9 to 10 lbs lighter than my 510. The CR weighs under 200 lbs dry. It's amazing how light they are. I don't think you can ride a lighter full on dirt bike.

I'd love to get into a 230 lb. wet 250 2T though.

'04 TE 510, with dampner, no headlight (it weighs 1 lb but I do not run it), # plate, same cyras as above, stock tank, full of fuel 254 lbs. 2 gals or 12 lbs of fuel equals 232 w/o fuel. The '04s were much lighter than the '05s and '06s. Like 12 lbs minimum on the '05s and then even if you remove the smog and turn signals still picked up another 5 lbs or so minimum.

4t's just feel heavier than they are due to the rotating mass of the engine. The bigger the displacement the heavier it feels also. A 250 weighs 4 lbs more than a 450 but feels 10 lbs heavier. A 510 is 6 lbs heavier than a 250 and feels 15 lbs heavier.

I can ride the CR125 for 50% longer than my 510. I might not be quite as fast but I am still unsure of the speed isssue yet. I'm sure I'd be faster on the 510 in sand and open stuff but slower in the super tight wet stuff. depedant on terrain more than likely. the both are fun. If i was riding desert definatly the 510. Riding foot trails in the mountains, than I take the CR125.

If I had to only own one bike. I would get a 230 lbs wet 250 2T.

And that folks is exactly why lots of pros race 250 2st's, fast AND light.

Not sure why no one else mentions it:

The TE is street legal. The weight of the horn, blinkers, flasher, wires and wire harness, brake lights, mirror, switches, license plate, etc. is significant.

A dual sported KTM or Yamaha or Honda will be very close to the Husqvarna.

Or--a striped down race ready Husky is leaner and meaner than meets the bathroom scale...

I agree - plus the extra plastic in the rear fender and the lic plate bolts might add too. It all adds up.

Q - did the crf250x have valves when you weighed it?

my experience with 2strokes, and 250,450, 510, 525, 550 & 650 thumpers is the "big bikes are more tiring" concept is over played and lame. Less displacement handles a bit nicer in tight spaces this is true, but riding any dirt bike regardless of size is roughly the same exercise. What this comment has to do with weight is well it's sort of related. Like the old song says "he ain't heavy, he's my brother"

I agree - plus the extra plastic in the rear fender and the lic plate bolts might add too. It all adds up.

Q - did the crf250x have valves when you weighed it?

Hell yes, $1000 worth of valves! My CRF250X was one of the many "valve eaters" and I spent a lot of money curing that problem. I'm not recommending the Honda to anyone.

Steve

It's not just the weight but too much power that makes you tired. In open spaces it isn't as noticeable. In tight timber too much power makes you hit trees.

my experience with 2strokes, and 250,450, 510, 525, 550 & 650 thumpers is the "big bikes are more tiring" concept is over played and lame. Less displacement handles a bit nicer in tight spaces this is true, but riding any dirt bike regardless of size is roughly the same exercise. What this comment has to do with weight is well it's sort of related. Like the old song says "he ain't heavy, he's my brother"
my experience with 2strokes, and 250,450, 510, 525, 550 & 650 thumpers is the "big bikes are more tiring" concept is over played and lame. Less displacement handles a bit nicer in tight spaces this is true, but riding any dirt bike regardless of size is roughly the same exercise. What this comment has to do with weight is well it's sort of related. Like the old song says "he ain't heavy, he's my brother"

A combination of factors.... extra power with explosive delivery can tire you out, extra rotational mass of bigger four stroke over smaller one and 4 stroke over 2 stroke. Put the head off a 2 stroke and 4 stroke on a bench and then pick them up. The 4 stroke definitely carries more weight up top and those cams and valves are moving, adding a big gyroscope that makes the bike go straight. Bobs a big strong guy, so I guess the difference is less to him than a stunted meth head like myself. :thumbsup:

Norman

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