Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

Boiled over Husaberg

Recommended Posts

I'm posting for a friend who reads this forum at work, but cannot post.

He has a 06 FE550 and rode a tight eastern style enduro today. The bike boiled over and lost coolant 10 miles in. It was about 60F. What's up with that? I didn't see anybody else running hot. My CRF250X ran just fine.

Any thoughts?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had to totally drain all the water (has water wetter only in it) out because I was transporting my bike through freezing weather, when I refilled and put fresh water wetter back in the thing boiled over a few times.....I did a thorough burping job this time and problem was solved...well almost, the rad cap on my bike wasn't exactly the correct one, after awhile the seal rubbed up against the inside of the overflow tube(from taking it on and off several times)and developed a slight tear, I put on a late model KTM one and it fit better....problem solved, My point is, they have a cooling system bleeder valve have him go through the manual If unsure of the steps....BTW If he is running anti freeze, got enough ?? or water wetter 6-8 capfulls....check all the hose clamps as well, do not over tighten there isn't that much pressure......hope that helps....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

lotta things can cause it. was he feathering the clutch more then usual?

jetting too lean? working the bike is tough slow conditions with little airflow can cause many bikes to spill their guts

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

a 650 is a big bike making a lot of heat. i'd suggest speeding up. lol.

seriously, i've never boiled over any bike, and I ride lots of tight technical low-speed stuff. i just keep rolling.

Husaberg does make a fan kit now. if it's earlier than an '06 you might have to do some jimmy-rigging to make it work with the tank.

lotsa clutch use can really heat up a big 4-stroke. if that's the problem, lower gearing might help.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
lotta things can cause it. was he feathering the clutch more then usual?

jetting too lean? working the bike is tough slow conditions with little airflow can cause many bikes to spill their guts

The bike is a 550 and I know they richened the jetting a little over stock. It only has a couple of hours on it.

The conditions were very tight, squeezing through trees, log infested trail with a turn every ten feet. You eastern guys know what I'm talking about. Everybody feathers the clutch through these sections, it was only 60F out and I didn't seen anybody else steaming over?

Maybe the FE550 just isn't meant for tight enduros? Motor makes too much heat for slow first gear running?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not really broken in.... I don't know about KTM's and Husabergs, but Huskys engines are quite tight when new. I wouldn't want to ride one in a tight enduro with only 2 hours on it.

Norman

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to ride Eastern enduros years ago when I was stationed over there in the Navy. They are tough. I can tell you that I have tortured my 550 many times and never once boiled it over. Try riding through two feet of snow in fourth gear at full throttle, while going about 2mph! :thumbsup: I suspect a new motor and lean jetting may have led to the problem. :thumbsup:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I rode about 50 miles of mostly single track this weekend, some of it first gear tight and rowdy. There were two 550's in the group, my 06 and an 05. Neither of us had overheating problems. We were both running 14 tooth primary sprockets. I think the 14 gives me more range to work in during the real tight stuff.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

you could try re-torqueing the head down as a start.

also, is your freind aware that the coolant should only just cover the vans and not have much at all in the top tank of thee radiator. he wouldn't be the first to say "hey look! there's room for more coolant in there!"

they are the first things to check. the next thing is to go for a good needle. EKP is the best for top end and the DVR is about the best for nice bolder hopping low end torque and fuel economy.

why not buy them both? try them back to back. the bike will have a DVR or similar in right now. you're looking to see if the third suffix on the needle is a D or an E here. it'll start: OB_ _ _. what speed riding does it happen at? very low speeds i bet!

regards

Taffy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Could just be a tight motor and jetting still too lean. Plus I know it's stock gearing and a tooth lower on the CS may help. All good advise. I'm sure he's not ready to trade it in for a Honda......... just yet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I know they richened the jetting a little over stock.

Maybe the FE550 just isn't meant for tight enduros? Motor makes too much heat for slow first gear running?

In CA I am told the Husaberg sweet spot (tricks) for passing EPA and CARB emissions is VERY lean Stock jetting and Tall gearing. So when you say richened it "a little" a little may not be enough. My 06 Fe450e was stock 38 pilot jet. The dealer dropped in a 48 pilot jet. so that's a lot richer then stock which was freeaky lean at 38 pj. My dealer also richened the needle one clip and I think dropped the main jet a small size down. My point is what pilot jet was your friend using?

Next regarding the 550 for tight enduros - the Husaberg web site advertizes something along the line "why not have more power when you need it in enduros" - so I say husaberg designed this bike to be a True Enduro Bike ready to take on all the nasty tight enduro stuff you throw at it.......... of course that is the design theme of the bike before the EPA gets to em.

The above is my poorly educated guess. I am NOT a mechanic or expert at all..just another TTer trying to offer some thoughts on the matter :thumbsup:

I run my TE-510 runs though all the nasty stuff. It does fine except if I feather the clutch excessivly in non moving situations. I have not over heated my Fe450e yet.... but I haven't yet truely feathered the clutch heavy in a stuck situation either.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Next regarding the 550 for tight enduros - the Husaberg web site advertizes something along the line "why not have more power when you need it in enduros" - so I say husaberg designed this bike to be a True Enduro Bike ready to take on all the nasty tight enduro stuff you throw at it.......... of course that is the design theme of the bike before the EPA gets to em.

I think that all makes good sense. fwiw, i have never observed anyone overheating any 4-stroke that was riding with me at my pace, even in very tight low-speed stuff on hot days. I have observed slower riders overheating their bikes while i wait at the top of a hill. Based on my limited riding on my new berg (25-ish hours), i do not expect overheating to ever be a problem, even tho i prefer tight, technical, low-speed fun trails. But I don't idle much.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm posting for a friend who reads this forum at work, but cannot post.

He has a 06 FE550 and rode a tight eastern style enduro today. The bike boiled over and lost coolant 10 miles in. It was about 60F. What's up with that? I didn't see anybody else running hot. My CRF250X ran just fine.

Any thoughts?

When you add coolant, remember to leave an air gap in the radiator. The proper coolant level is 10mm above the fins when you look inside through the cap. As the engine heats up, the coolant expands and needs some place to go. If you top the radiator off it will push the excess out the over flow tube, leaving the impression of an over heated motor.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It boils over when it runs hot, and these bikes run at a lot of rpm, therefore tend to overheat easily. If he does not have a catch coolant bottle mounted under the rear fender, then he needs one.

Check my gallery at husaberg.org.

Some people have good results with the Evans coolant. The boiling point is much higher than regular coolant.

Also a fan mod can be a good thing too, but let him start with the bottle and the Evans coolant.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If he does not have a catch coolant bottle mounted under the rear fender, then he needs one.

What he really needs is a 'coolant recovery system'.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, Chas_M's correct. There's a big difference between a catch tank and a coolant recovery system. The 'berg radiator cap is just a pressure blow-off device and lacks the thermal control valve and secondary seal to function as a recovery system.

Froggy your catch tank just serves to keep coolant from spilling on the trail should your radiator over-flow. You can just toss it in the trash and save the weight... :thumbsup:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well actually not quite true. The volume of coolant in the bottle increases as the coolant in the radiator expands. Air is of course pushed out. When the coolant cools down, then it is sucked back into the radiator as it shrinks back to its original volume.

I can assure you that's what happens with my bike and I ride in the Arizona summer, I know heat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

id start with the jetting overheating is usually caused by the bike being too lean, but in the tight stuff my 650 did boil over once so i had to get it onto the open stuff and cool it back down, im now considering making a 4 fan cooling system for it

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×