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Paging Crazy Luke!

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I noticed the pictures. (nice) Evidently you know a thing or two about maintence. I took the shock off my E and noticed that the swingarm does not move up and down freely, it actually takes some effort to do this. Is this normal or does this sound like a problem?

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I haven't dropped the suspension yet on my DR-Z, but I will sometime in the next few weeks. On my DR350, there was no more play in the swingarm than there was in a properly set steering stem. That is to say, a little resistance, but it moved through its range with a finger's pressure.

Here are a couple of ideas from others posted a long time ago: if you have a lot - I mean A LOT - of grease packed in the swingarm bearings, this can make the swingarm resist movement. More common is the old pitted bearings - directly related to running in a lot of water. I don't run my bike in water much, but I've heard plenty of folks say that routiene water work requires a lot more servicing of wheel, swingarm, and linkage bearings. It was true when I was a kid - CR80, etc.; but Dad used to take care of all that.

My advice: Drop the swingarm. At least you can clean, inspect, and repack with a good quality grease. There are spacers that run inside the needle bearings - pull the swingarm, pull the spacers. Clean all the gunk out; slide the spacers back in; there should be no free play front and back and side to side; repack with a medium amount of your favorite grease.

Hey, the good news is that a little on the tight side is better to note than a little on the loose side - if the swingarm is loose when you disconnect the shock, you know the bearings are shot.

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Just wanted to say thank you again Crazy Luke. I began to follow your advice and found out that apparently there was no grease in the right side of the swingarm and way to much in another area. The thing moves completely effortlessly now! If I had not looked into that I would have put my newly revalved and resprung shock onto a swingarm that took two hands to pivot--what a waste!

I did attempt to take the swingarm pivot shaft out and could not for the life of me get the thing to move. Is there a secret? According to the shop manual you just remove the nut and take out the shaft. I will probably need to do this at a later date.

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