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Review of Rekluse Auto Clutch

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I have two rides in on my new Rekluse auto clutch and I have to say I'm very pleased. The install wasn't hard, but was pretty much a all afternoon sort of project. I also installed a left hand rear brake kit and a two finger cluth over-ride with the adjuster on the perch (which I rarely seem to need). It has all worked great right from the beginning. After struggling to get up a tricky hill in first gear, I tried it in second and the autoclutch helped me clean the hill easily. Not having to worry about clutch action in techinical sessions has also eased fatigue and just made it more fun all the way around. I ride mountain bikes alot, and having both brakes up on the bars has also been nice as it makes for a set-up just like the bicycle - in fact I like that as much as not having to worry about clutch manipulation. The brake on the bar is especially nice on tricky downhill sections where you need to paddle, such as nasty rock/rut stuff. So first impressions are that it was worth the investment -making the ride more enjoyable and easier at the same time! :ride::banana::busted:

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On the 250R and X the Rekluse is near flawless, almost impossible to stall. The 450 is another story. Did you know Rekluse is coming out with an electronically controlled auto clutch?

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No I didn't, that's interesting...

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Just my opinion...

I think if you take the clutch manuvering out of motorcycling, won't it take the fun out of it? I'm not quite sure how to explain this, but basically, being able to hit the clutch, and rev the engine, as well as clutching for wheelies, and slipping it through tricky sections, and pretty much being IN control is what it's all about. Call me old fashioned (even though I'm only 17) but I think the "standard" method is where its at. Again, just my opinion but I view the auto-transmission as a lazy mans way out. The more one removes the chance for human error, the more 'Robotic' it becomes. I compare like this: Actually Flying a jet, or just Riding in a jet. The only application I can see where it would be needed is in the case of someone who is disabled (here: http://www.transworldmotocross.com/mx/slideshow/videos/0,20829,1015711_1159653,00.html). But I can see how some people may perfer this system. I, however can not see how this would be benificial to riding. I would feel like I was not in control. P.S --I don't mean to hijack your thread lol. :ride: No matter how you ride, have fun! :banana:

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Just my opinion...

I think if you take the clutch manuvering out of motorcycling, won't it take the fun out of it? I'm not quite sure how to explain this, but basically, being able to hit the clutch, and rev the engine, as well as clutching for wheelies, and slipping it through tricky sections, and pretty much being IN control is what it's all about. Call me old fashioned (even though I'm only 17) but I think the "standard" method is where its at. Again, just my opinion but I view the auto-transmission as a lazy mans way out. The more one removes the chance for human error, the more 'Robotic' it becomes. I compare like this: Actually Flying a jet, or just Riding in a jet. The only application I can see where it would be needed is in the case of someone who is disabled (here: http://www.transworldmotocross.com/mx/slideshow/videos/0,20829,1015711_1159653,00.html). But I can see how some people may perfer this system. I, however can not see how this would be benificial to riding. I would feel like I was not in control. P.S --I don't mean to hijack your thread lol. :ride: No matter how you ride, have fun! :banana:

It doesn't take anything away from the joy of riding. I still have my clutch and use it alot, probably more out of habit then out of necessity, but it's there to loft the front wheel when necessary or grab a little extra power when needed. The single biggest advantage to me is that I NEVER stall my bike. In an 85 mile enduro that means alot. Every stall costs time and energy. With the auto clutch I can ride longer, faster, with less effort and fatigue. We had a long ride yesterday in the rain and I dumped my bike twice, both times as I regrouped myself, my bike just laid there and idled.

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I have been told that you can still use your clutch just like before.

It that accurate?

Is it any harder to use the clutch?

Thanks,

Mike C

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Yes, you can still use the clutch when needed, but you rarely need it. I can relate to the point about sort of dumbing down your ride - losing the skillt to manipulate the clutch, and when I was 17 I may have felt the same way. But I'm 50 and anything that makes the ride easier is a blessing. I going faster with less worry and more "flow" to my riding - and thats just more fun to me! :ride:

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TerryA,

Thanks for the info.

I have a Rekluse sitting in my garage and I have been tenative about putting it on. I will put it on soon, as my riding needs all the help it can get.

Mike

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I'm still kinda confused on this. So it's basically like an automatic? You can just ride along and upshift with the shifter without pulling in the clutch? Dont mean to sound dumb but can somebody explain?

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Yup, you just back off and shift, up or down - no issue. The best part from a riding perspective is being able to crawl through technical sections, cram on the brakes, ride a gear too high to get better traction on a hill, and do all that without ever stalling or worrying about slipping the clutch. If you start to bog and want a boost, you can grab the lever and override it to disengage it. Cool eh!

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Has ANYONE tried it on a 2-stroke?

Im on a 125 2 stroke and I want one, but dont know if itll be any good.

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Has ANYONE tried it on a 2-stroke?

Im on a 125 2 stroke and I want one, but dont know if itll be any good.

They're everywhere out there in the 2 stroke world. I've had them in 3 smokers over the years. Half my riding buds have them in their 2 & 4 strokes.

They work great in both types.

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So it's kinda like a torque converter,without the fluid exchange?

Not really. It's just a clutch that is disengaged at rest held open by spring pressure. It automatically engages itself when the RPM's rise and then disengages when they drop.

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It basically uses centrifugal force. As the motor revs, centrifugal force moves a bunch of small balls up a ramp which engages the clutch just like you were letting the lever out.

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Well I am 62 yrs old and have ridden for 40 plus yrs. Husky Auto, etc.. and the aid of the recluse is the same as the old husky's. Trust me when I say you can enjoy a fast pace ride and if you want to dart in and out of the trees, jump a water bar or climb a sandy rock ledge you have both the auto clutch and the standard. Off cambers that need that special traction, no wheel spin and max speed the recluse is it. I rode two dual sports this mo. 174 miles one day, one two day 200 miles and the recluse works like a champ.Change your oil after each ride and you will get extended life. Two bucks is cheap for perfect function all day every day. 04 crf250X presently, Had 32 bikes in 30 yrs of racing. Recluse is the nuts.

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I have one in my CRF270X and keep smoking the clutch and over heating the motor. This only happens in deep soft sand but we have a lot of that out here in the desert. I have had to readjust it on every ride and they look cooked. Maybe I need better clutch plates?

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I'm getting ready to buy the Rekluse for my 250x and am undecided on the perch adjuster. Is it worth the $100 to still have the manual clutch? Will I still use it with the auto clutch? I'm kind of afraid, out of habit, I'll sill use the manual cutch if it's there. I guess I'll be able to break that habit though. I ride tight single track in the east (hare scrambles). What do you guys think? Is it an option worth getting? Thanks

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I've only got two rides and I've only used the manual over ride a few times. Not being sure what to expect, I dropped the extra cash. One example is when dropping into a V shaped gully, I needed to hit it hard at the bottom to climb out. The first time I hit it hard it stalled. The second time, I used the clutch override and got some Rs first, then engaged the clutch and zoomed up the incline on the opposite side of the gully. I've also used it to start off when the bike is cold and prone to stalling.

Hope that helps you decide.

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