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Riding in Sand - Again

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:excuseme:

I took out my new bike (first one) for the first trail ride since I bought it last week.

We have sand-covered trails here and I had a hard time keeping the bike up. I got better after about 20 miles. I figured out a few things as the miles went by.

I did an archive search here and made a list. Here is what I came up with.

Would you add anything to this list below?

Also, I was going to change out my stock tires (Pirelli MT 320) with the Pirelli MT32 front (dot) and Kenda Trackmaster rear (dot)

Will the Pirelli MT 32 be any better than the stock Pirelli MT 320? If not, then I don't want to spend the time and money changing the tires.

Also, for these sandy trails, what air pressure should I run in front and back?

Here is the List

Sit on back 1/3 of seat to keep front light.

Keep finger off front brake and try to use rear brake only.

Keep on throttle to keep front light

Air down tires (to what psi?)

Keep a loose grip on bars with very little bar input.

Keep knees against bike

Keep speed up for easier tracking

Stay in one gear up.

Let front tire go where it wants, don’t fight it.

To turn try to weight the outside peg and lean the bike then straighten the bike when the turn is over. Throttle at start of turn. Try not to turn front wheel so much so it doesn’t wash out.

Thanks for the education.

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alright, first thing, I hear people saying sit back. Everyone i ride with including me always ride right up against the tank when cornering in sand. Whether its glamis, a wash, or just a sandy trail, you always want to be up against the tank. It helps to stop the front wheel from chopping and kind of helps dig a rut to keep it from washing out. Second, i don't think theres anything wrong with using the front brake, i use a mixture of both. Third, the whole bar thing, when riding in sand, usually the bike doesn't want to go strait. You sort of half to let the bike do what it has to do, but keep control. That means anything from standing up to let the bike do what it wants under you to sitting down and just taking the wiggle in your body. Forth, for the keeping one gear up, i don't know about that. Just keep it in the power band, and if your new, it can be deceiving because there is so much tire spin that it feels like your not on the power.

The single biggest thing you can do to improve your sand riding is just get out and ride in it. Different things work for different people. Reading it on a web site is totally different from doing it in real life. Just keep an open mind, something that might work great one day might not work as well another.......

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if you can go out riding in sand right after it rains you will love it the sand is nice and hard and you can rail any thing and to learn just keep riding as the sand drys out it will get harder and harder but you wont really notice it as much as going from hard dirt to deep sand

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I put on Pirelli MT 32 front, and Kenda trackmaster II on the rear last week. I put about 80 miles on so far on the same terrain. I haven't noticed a difference from the stock tires.

Stock tires were Pirelli MT 320 front and rear.

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[You said: To turn try to weight the outside peg... Throttle at start of turn...]

Except on a hillside, try instead weighting the INSIDE peg more than the outside peg (this will help the bike to turn itself). Also, try waiting until you're coming OUT of the turn before you get on the gas.

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While far from an expert I've found braking with both brakes is ok[just get it done before the apex],gas it thru the turn and let the front find its own home in ruts[never ending in deep sand].Do not turn handlebars while turning in deep sand gotta lean it and steer with the throttle.

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I ride in sand alot...I like to sit up by the tank and go fast. The faster the easier for me. I run stock tires at 12lbs. I would like to run less but we have some big rocks in the sand. I also squeeze the bike with my legs and just go with the flow. It is kinda like ski-ing ...

I went over the handle bars only once and landing in that soft sand was nice....not even a scratch on me or the bike. Sand is good.

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Yeah, tons of sand out here in the AZ desert. When I first started riding, I hated sand. But once you get the feel for it, there's nothin better. You can really haul a$$, turn and stop on a dime! Sand is all about staying loose, and steering with your hips - just like snowboarding/wakeboarding/surfing. Generally, you should be changing yer body position constantly - ie - get way back on the seat/rear fender when accelerating for traction, get up closer to the tank when entering sharp turns, and move back as you apex and exit the turn. You certainly can and should use your front brake, not only to slow down, but it can be used to help you turn quicker as well. If you stab yer front brake and turn yer bars when entering a sharp turn, It'll cause the front tire to dive/knife into the sand, and get you turning in a hurry. If ya throttle it right then youll rip through the turn like you couldnt believe. It's a fairly advanced technique I guess, but I figured it out on my own - by accident of course.... Spend a few days in the sand dunes, and you'll have it all figured out! Speed is yer friend in the sand!!

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I ride the dunes quite a bit and its alot like the washes or trails and what you need to do is keep your eyes out in front of you keep your weight to the back of the bike or stand. if you are on a straight away just try standing cause that is the best. then I use the term When in doubt throttle it out method and that seems to work really good and basicaly that means if you are turning a corner and there is sand throttle up and you will turn the corner better and you wont fall. I use this alot when in the dunes. also like you said you saw keep your throttle up because that will keep your front tire up and out of the deep stuff it will just float on the surface of the sand that is also why you need to keep a semi loose grip on the handle bars because they will move around in the other ruts made by others and it will feel like you are squirly but you arnt and if you feel like your going to tip over just throttle it up and most of the times you wont fall.

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I ride in sand off and on. We mostly ride tight woods, but sometimes we go to Dyracuse, or are somwhere where it's pretty sandy. When we get in the sand, I usually sit back a bit on the seat when not cornering, but when setting up for a corner or bank I slide up to the tank and get ready to plant my foot if I need to in order to upright or to slide the rear out. Speed is pretty important in the sand. If you slow down too much you'll feel like a tank in quick sand, and you'll find yourself fighting the bike.....off the trail.....into a tree....or two.... :-) Definitely been there at one time or another. :-)

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The stock tires are junk, especially the front! Get some maxxis IT's. I agree with the body changing deal, your always kind of compensating and adjusting. With some new tires and mainly experience you will be blasting through in no time!

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Where I ride there's deep sand, sand whoops and hard pack with sand washouts. Here's the basic skills you have to apply to get up and controlling your bike in deep sand (at least what worked for me).

> Get the bike going by blipping the throttle and standing up immediately

>> Remain standing

>> Place upward/backward tension on the bars by keeping your arms straight

>> Keep your feet towards the rear of the peg and straighten your legs without locking your knees

> You want to keep the front tire floating while the rear tire paddles the bike (like a boat)

> Keep your momentum constant and look outward

> Let the bike scoot around under you and don't try to force it

> Once you decelerate your front tire will dig which will make you fishtail and loose control (like riding a jet ski) so downshift wisely?

> When turning use your knees and feet to steer (practice this on hard pack first)

> To stop, slightly roll off the throttle and let the front end dig into the sand, sit down and break as normal

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I don't ride in sand as much as I do dirt but I know the faster you go the easier it is to move the bike, I have to lean back on my xr200 just a little bit but on bigger bikes if you keep the throttle up it floats the front wheel. and don't try and make the bike move because if you force it it will catch .

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Having Grown Up In Pismo I Have Had Some Sand Time.

Lessons Learned;

1 Paddles Are Good But Low Air Pressure On Both Ends Will Work Fine.

2 You Have To Stay Ontop Of The Sand, Going Slow Is Hard Work.

3 And Most Important In The Dunes [as Opposed To A River Bottom] The Dune Line Is Deceptive, Ie; What Looks Like 1 Dune Can Be Many Or Have Many Steep Deep Ridges That Will Kill You Quick, So Know Where You Are, Jumping Off A Dune And Impacting On The Next One Will Ruin Your Day Adversly Some One Else Jumping On To You Will Ruin Your Week.

4 Use The Dune Shapes As A Road Way Dont Fight Them Use Them, Bowls Make Good High Speed Banks.

5 Keep Mouth Closed And Sand Out Of Brain.

6 Do Not Run Anything Sticky On Your Chain, Use A Dry Lube, Such As Chain Wax.

7 Be Agressive

8 Learn The Colors Of The Sand Usually Darker Is Heaver And Firmer While Whiter Is Deeper And Softer Which Will Kill Your Forward Motion.

9 I Will Second That A Ride In The Sand After A Heavy Rain Is Heaven

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