scrated fork causing seals to leak...now what?!?

i went down at a race a few weeks ago and i realized that when i fell, the lower fork tube must of scraped a rock or something. I believe this to be the reason why my fork seals are leaking. Is there any way to repair this? File it down? Any help would be appreciated because i dont wanna be replacing fork seals every other week.

Depends on how bad the mark is. Many can be polished out.

yeah but if it rubs down too much it will just make a bigger/deeper hole like this

|

|

(

|

allowing ecen more fluid to come out

kinda hard to explain on the comp

another way to have it fixed it to send it to factory connections, you can have them relayer your lower forks then bring them back to origional form for about 100$ per fork

i think i got it smooth enough to where tehy shouldnt leak. We'll see. It only has to last the rest of this season cause next spring im gettin the new 450f.

If there was a burr that damaged the seal, polishing off the burr won't fix it. You need a new seal. The small dent that remains may still leak every time the seal passes over it but it should be a lot better. You only want to remove the raised material. Polishing the tube down to the bottom of the nick won't help and might make it worse.

I learned this trick from the mountain bike world. Mix up some epoxy glue, then cover the knick in the stanchion with the glue. You may have to pull the lowers if it's too close to the seal. When the glue is dry, take some high grit sandpaper (say, 400) and sand it smooth. The expoxy should have filled in the scratch, and the stanchion coating shouldn't be affected due to the high-grit paper.

I learned this trick from the mountain bike world. Mix up some epoxy glue, then cover the knick in the stanchion with the glue. You may have to pull the lowers if it's too close to the seal. When the glue is dry, take some high grit sandpaper (say, 400) and sand it smooth. The expoxy should have filled in the scratch, and the stanchion coating shouldn't be affected due to the high-grit paper.

That sounds like a plausible idea, but I'd block sand it carefully so as not to screw up the surrounding area.

I'd first carefully remove any high points with about 220 to 400 wet/dry by block sanding. By block sanding in this scale, I mean something like wrapping a stiff piece of hard rubber or small block of wood about 1" x 3" with sandpaper and carefully take down the high spots. Finish with the 400 grit. If you just wrap sand paper around the area like shinning a shoe, you will take off too much in the wrong areas. You need to "spot" sand and not dig down deeper than flush.

If you do try to fill the low area, first degrease it with a solvent like acetone, lacquer thinner or the like. Carefully fill the nick and remove excess before it hardens. Then repeat the block sanding routine to bring the surface flush.

A preferred method is probably to just leave the small nick, but take off the raised area and forgetting the fill. Just make sure that there is nothing to snag the seal on. Yeah, replace the old seals.

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now