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Why Don't More People Ride Enduro's???

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The title says it all why don't more people do enduro's. I just got done doing my 1st and I am hooked.

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Because they are all sissies!! Some people that I've talked to that ride the harescrambles don't like the distance thing. Plus you actually have to use your brain, and some people don't like to do that.

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I think it's because everyone knows you sandbaggers will be there :thumbsup:

I don't care what class you ride well I do, but these events are a blast. I mean what other event can you talk to fellow racers. You can make adjustments and so on.

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Because most people are scared of the distance and the cost of the hardware to run the enduros...I say just show up and have a good time and have fun buuuuuuut..don't sign up for the long course if you've never done one...he he :thumbsup:

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Most if not all MX bikes come without odometers or clocks. That's not to say it's hard to put one on, but people don't have to like riding enduros. If they're curious I'm sure they'll check it out sometime.

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On the serious side, I dabbled in it for the first time a couple years ago and ended up doing 3 or 4. I probably rate an "upper-intermediate C class rider" Surprisingly, I found sandbagging going on in alot of the lower classes. I would watch or follow these guys and they clearly were a step above, yet were entered in entry level classes......even heard joking about it from time to time in the staging area.

This kind of turned me off. I love the challenge and tests and the whole concept of enduros but when there are hot shoes entered in every class, what's there to get excited about?

It could be said "maybe you just suck as a rider and the others just happen to be better riders trying enduro themselves as entry-level riders?" Always a possibility but I don't think I suck either. I'm no Juha, mind you, but I can get down the trail at a decent pace and the guys blowing through my class in all the events I did clearly had their game on.

Don't mistake this for whining. If I get my ass whipped......so be it. It's just my perception that there are some riders who target the entry-level classes so they can get the man juices flowing and as one who follows the rules and likes honest competition, sandbagging is a turn-off!

I'd like to start doing them again though. Maybe the classes are monitored a little better now.

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Sorry if this is rant like, but here goes:

At least in Oregon, the two or three enduros a year (one early spring, one early summer, and one late fall in 06') just isn't enough to justify participation and doesn't promote the skills and knowledge necessary to be successful or even frankly feel like your improving to an extent that you can feel competitive for the investment of time, effort, and equipment. Nothing deters the spirit more than feeling out of place, uncomfortable, unfamiliar, and getting your azz kicked at the same time by some mad course designer team. Enduro riding is obviously a developed skill set/discipline, if you will.

In Oregon, you can reasonably compete in all the GP series events and have some skill building and/or consistency between events. Very good continuity if you hit a couple of the non-enduro CC/HS events and also hit the Worcs races, etc. Racing from essentially March to November each year.

There is no current Oregon enduro series and the current problem with the Oregon CC/HS series is that it includes the three enduros...different gig...different riding philosphy IMHO. Haulin azz over hill and dale for XX miles VS being a scholar of the game and knowing when the enduro gods can throw a curve at you, etc. (skip the enduros included in the series or ride them like a CC without the time investment in mastering enduro and take the points you get for last or whatever place you get for riding it). * There are some positives to this arrangement, but this thread doesn't seek that info, so...

To me the key is to have an annual early calander year enduro school or teaching enduro to kick off the OR, WA, or Pac NW enduro championship series of events. Then we would have a series that you could participate in and grow in from year to year. Unfortunately, the current event environment is not working unless you have the ability to throw down and have the $$ and time to travel a good portion of the U.S. One enduro in April, one in July, and one in late October doesn't do it. If there was a Pac NW series (3-4 Oregon events + 3-4 Washington events + Idaho City ISDE Qualifier for example) or a stand alone Oregon series, I could get seriously into it. Washington (NMA) seems to have the same issue with a limited event schedule with essentially 5 ??? enduros on 4 event weekends by my quick check, although you do have an "Enduro" series.

Without a structured enduro series, its hard to get all the participants. OMRA and NMA should collaborate more to up the competition, increase riders in the enduro series, and the # of events in the series. See if we can knock out date conflicts where its not necessary to encourage cross participation between NMA and OMRA. Its already going on somewhat, but enduro doesn't seem to be the shining star here.

Okay I guess maybe having the following is asking way too much??

1st weekend non-competitive (poker runs, dual sport, etc)

2nd weekend Enduro

3rd weekend GP's

4th weekend CC/hare scrambles

Just kidding :thumbsup:

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I didn't have much interest in enduros until I finially gave it a try.

I think too many people are put off by the time-keeping aspect, and I'll admit that until I had someone show me the ropes it seemed very foreign.

It's a lot of fun. A bit more relaxing than the harescrambles. It's more social and great group of people compete in these events.

To be competitive you have to be a good rider, but you don't necessairly have to be the fastest rider. The added challenge is becoming good at the time-keeping, and once you start to get the hang of it you really enjoy it.

I think if you haven't tried one do yourself a favor and just give it a shot. Next year attend the beginner enduros.

I am really looking forward to the black bear.

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Scared of the distance? Dont give yourself too much credit. Matter of fact, most the people I know who dig enduros and ISDE's like them because they can ride a slower pace and take breaks at the check points.

To me, they're just not as fun as a hare scramble. Its more fun to go out and race head's up with other riders, not worrying about staying on time. Same goes for ISDE's. Although you don't have to keep track of as much stuff as a normal timekeeper, its still too much BS to just go race.

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I love these things. You get to use your brain for about 20 miles and then you fall so far behind that you just go until you can't go anymore. I ride the senior class C, so that means beginner for the short course. However last weekend I got to hook up with a good rider on my minute and what do you know, we ended up with two points overall. Second place in my class, and 8th overall for the short course. Now that made it really fun. Thank you Russ, I couldn't have done it without you. And you don't need a fancy bike either. I did it on an 16 year old xr200. Too bad the next one isn't until Nov. ( I hope Russ is there. Bye the way he took 2nd in the senior :thumbsup:.

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Scared of the distance? Dont give yourself too much credit. Matter of fact, most the people I know who dig enduros and ISDE's like them because they can ride a slower pace and take breaks at the check points.

To me, they're just not as fun as a hare scramble. Its more fun to go out and race head's up with other riders, not worrying about staying on time. Same goes for ISDE's. Although you don't have to keep track of as much stuff as a normal timekeeper, its still too much BS to just go race.

I race Both the NMA Off road and Enduro series and in my opinion it is far harder to race a clock than another rider. You have no one to key off just a clock counting down. True speed can be hard to judge if you have no one to compare to! Try and go fast watch your timekeeping equipment and stay on a single track trail without eatin it. Also enduro terrain is usually tougher than the majority of hare scrambles and GP's. And your forgetting you don't go around a 6+ mile course that only changes slightly from course deterioration its usually 80+ miles of different terrain.And yes there are breaks but there is also longer mileage and special tests where you will truly test your skill and endurance to your fullest.Come on up to Washington and compete in our Black Bear enduro and I believe you will have a new found respect for Enduros and Enduro Riders!

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I love these things. You get to use your brain for about 20 miles and then you fall so far behind that you just go until you can't go anymore. I ride the senior class C, so that means beginner for the short course. However last weekend I got to hook up with a good rider on my minute and what do you know, we ended up with two points overall. Second place in my class, and 8th overall for the short course. Now that made it really fun. Thank you Russ, I couldn't have done it without you. And you don't need a fancy bike either. I did it on an 16 year old xr200. Too bad the next one isn't until Nov. ( I hope Russ is there. Bye the way he took 2nd in the senior :thumbsup:.

Was that Russ Norman? Big funny guy on a KTM 200?

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Was that Russ Norman? Big funny guy on a KTM 200?

Yep, that would be him. Quite likeable too.

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I race Both the NMA Off road and Enduro series and in my opinion it is far harder to race a clock than another rider. You have no one to key off just a clock counting down. True speed can be hard to judge if you have no one to compare to! Try and go fast watch your timekeeping equipment and stay on a single track trail without eatin it. Also enduro terrain is usually tougher than the majority of hare scrambles and GP's. And your forgetting you don't go around a 6+ mile course that only changes slightly from course deterioration its usually 80+ miles of different terrain.And yes there are breaks but there is also longer mileage and special tests where you will truly test your skill and endurance to your fullest.Come on up to Washington and compete in our Black Bear enduro and I believe you will have a new found respect for Enduros and Enduro Riders!

No disrespect to Enduro riders. Poking fun is tough to pick up on over the internet I suppose. :thumbsup:

They're tough. I get that.

BTW it would be great to ride some NMA Enduros. I just don't think I'd do very well, as I can't be bothered to keep time, I'd just go ride around. :ride:

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How come you guys don't race motocross. Is it cause you cant?

Track Bunnies :ride:

Yamahacrazy...... come to the Buttstomper this weekend up in Gold Bar and show us how easy off road and enduro riding is :thumbsup:

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How come you guys don't race motocross. Is it cause you cant?

I think MX is another good discipline that improves an offroad racer. I'd like to do more MX and MX races. but honestly I find MX races kind of boring compared to offroad. too much standing around waiting for your motos. I get a lot more for my money with offroad racing.

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