Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

Adjusting Valves: How important is it?

Recommended Posts

I have an 06 YZ250F and I got my valves recalled and replaced and everything is good now, but I was wondering how important is it to adjust your valve clearances if you don't race the bike. It seems like a lot of work to inspect and adjust them and on my old TTR125 I never touched the valves once and it still runs perfect. My friend told me that adjusting the valves was the one downfall of owning a four stroke. The bike has been ridden for 15-20 hours and I have changed the oil once, is there any other critical things I really need to do to my bike?

Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, if you check the clearance and find that they don't need to be adjusted, then checking it was a complete waste of time and effort that could have been spent in a mindless, slack jawed stupor in front of the X Box. If, however, they need adjusting, it is absolutely imperative that they be adjusted, and that they be rechecked with greater frequency after that, at least until it can be seen weather they will hold at their new settings or they are starting to wear rapidly. If they are run out of spec, either too tight or too loose, the life of the valve train will be shorter, the engine performance possibly poorer, and in the case of older valves, possibly a catastrophic engine failure costing around $2000.

So, how important is that, do you think? The thing is, you don't know unless you check.

Your TTR was as overbuilt playbike with an engine like a farm implement, made to be dealt with as if it were a toaster. The penalty for that is performance that produces all the excitement of watching lettuce wilt. Your YZF is a no-compromises race bike that produces power in quantities and at speeds that as little as ten years ago would have been impossible to accomplish with any reliability. It amazes me that they require no more maintenance than they do. That's the price. If it's more than you are up for, then either pay to have it done, or swap it for a two-stroke.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

not important at all. hey while your at it, dont change your oil, never clean your air filter, and dont lube the chain! its all a waste of time that you could be out riding. with 15-20 hours one one oil change, your probally looking at a pricy rebuild on that motor if something magically happens to go wrong.

my point is, take the extra hour and do your oil changes, do your air filters, check your valves. it will be WELL worth it in the long run

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not going to weigh in on the valves and Grey handled that,but it amazes me at the frequency of your oil changes.

At minimum,you need to be changing it every couple hours(IMO) even with light use.

Like Grey mentioned,its a no compromise engine that can cost 2000+ when things go awry. At least keep fresh blood in it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok I'll check the valves, but in the manual it says that the engine oil should be replaced every 1000 km, which is about 50hrs of riding. To change it every couple of hours is sheer overkill. IMO.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

doesnt the manuel say to check valves like every 20 hrs?? and on a Yami, you shouldnt have to start checkin the valves until its got liek 70-80 hrs on it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The way I look at it is that checking and adjusting the valves does not cost anything (except the shim kit- big deal), and an oil change costs $6. It is just time. I actually do not mind working on my bike, and I take pride in its condition and maintenance. I even wash my bike after I ride. You could do 350 oil changes before you would approach the cost of rebuilding the motor. if you do not want to do maintenance and want tractor like reliability, get an xr. I do not mean to sound sarcastic, but we are not dealing with Toyota Corollas, we are dealing with Farrari Enzos where a oil change costs $900, and a brake job is $30,000. The example was not given to highlight the cost of upkeep on our bikes, but rather the difference between complete reliability and all out performance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ok I'll check the valves, but in the manual it says that the engine oil should be replaced every 1000 km, which is about 50hrs of riding. To change it every couple of hours is sheer overkill. IMO.
So you only ride at 20km/h? Try 55 km/h (35 mph). That works out to be 18 hours.

If you're going to argue that you ride only tight trails and don't reach those speeds, ask yourself how many revolutions your engine racks up in 1st and 2nd compared to a bike that spends the same amount of time in 3rd, 4th, and 5th. Change your oil every 10 hours, or every 3rd ride day if the bike spends more than 80% of its time in the dirt.

If you think there's no reason to, you're kidding yourself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The manual may say every 20 hours or so, but experience has shown that more frequent oil changes mean longer engine life. Maybe it's overkill (but probably not), but the old saying applies: Oil is ALWAYS cheaper than metal. Change it often and check your valves.

As for valves, Gray covered it, but I'll add this. You'll find that your Yammy is MUCH more reliable then the other brands, and you won't be adjusting them very often. But you should check them at least twice a year. It only takes about 30 minutes, and might just save you big bucks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Change your oil often and with a fairly reputable brand. You will be happy that you don't have to shell out big $$ when your crank decides that your oil fails at what it was designed to do.

Maintenance is cheap, neglect is not.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your TTR spun about 7K max. The YZ 250F redlines at 13.5K.

Hrm, wonder which one will be harder on the oil plus require more frequent maintenance?????

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×