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Brakes squeaking - fix it Q?

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This has got me sweating bullets. Did I screw up my rear disc brake or is this something with a straight forward fix?

Problem: Brand New '06 KTM 625 SMC. Stock counter sprocket was a 17T, so changed out to a 15T. In process had to readjust chain tension. Used chain adjusters as best I could to match left and right side equally. While there, changed basic position of foot brake pedal by adjusting push rod and stop roller. There is the recommended 3-5 mm free play on the foot pedal before piston in the brake cylinder moves.

With bike on the lift, the rear wheel spins freely, but with a very slight brake pad rubbing for about 1/4 of the rotation. Is this okay? Don't see why only a 1/4 rotation. Should it not be rubbing at all?

Now out on the road using the brake I get a SQUEAK!!!!. Not all the time. Not under hard braking, but seems like under easy braking as the pads start to grab. Very scary metal rubbing sound. I've got a picture to post, but don't know how.

Question: Could this be because of mis-aligned chain adjusters? What is tolerance on getting left and right side equal?

Could this be because of me accidently getting grease/oil/dirt/whatever on the disc or pads while working down there? If so, how to clean?

Could this be because of imsaligned brake pads? I did pull them out of the caliper to see what they looked like. I put them back same way cause it is so easy, I think.

HELP!! It is driving me nuts worry about screwing up the disc or other components. It should not squeak at all.

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First of all - don't worry :thumbsup: KTM brakes known for this "feature" (rather than "bug"). They are precise, with a very definite pressure point, hard to kill - but tend to squeak... Dunno why :ride: What helps - temporarily - is to lightly brush the brake pad's surface with fine (say, 200-grit) sandpaper. When it gets "burnt" it will re-start squeaking. If you have some oil/grease on the disc just buy a can of "brake cleaner fluid" and apply it generously all over the disc and the brake assembly. Beware, the material is flammable, use while the brake is cold!

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First of all - don't worry :thumbsup: KTM brakes known for this "feature" (rather than "bug"). They are precise, with a very definite pressure point, hard to kill - but tend to squeak... Dunno why :ride: What helps - temporarily - is to lightly brush the brake pad's surface with fine (say, 200-grit) sandpaper. When it gets "burnt" it will re-start squeaking. If you have some oil/grease on the disc just buy a can of "brake cleaner fluid" and apply it generously all over the disc and the brake assembly. Beware, the material is flammable, use while the brake is cold!

I'd not be surprised by this squeaking happening later on when the bike is a little older, but this is a new SMC with less than 500 miles on it. And the noise started soon after doing the sprocket change out. So I hope it will be fixed with sandpaper and brake cleaner fluid. Could it in anyway be caused by a too tight chain? I think I got the tension/freeplay right, but.... I am a novice.

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My 06 640 LC4 SM rear (and sometimes front) brake squeaks since 100 miles in the clock or so :ride: Since the brake disc and the rear hub / brake assembly are always in-line (they're literally bolt together) neither too much chain tension, nor misaligned rear wheel will cause "brake sqeak". It just won't change their relational geomerty... IMHO :thumbsup:

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dude, realign the wheel! go to a good workshop to get it computer aligned. as csory says they're very precise. the naked eye can't always get a perfect alignment. I assume you haven't dropped the bike or hit the disc while changing the sprocket else that means you've got a bent disc ya?

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Thanks for input. What exactly is "realign the wheel"? Is that the same as balancing the wheel (with rim weights)?

Is it to align the chair tensioners? Or have someone check the disc itself for alignment (warp)?

Is the disc adjustable? I cant see anyway that is adjustable to "align" it, as it just bolts to the hub. The calipers and brake housing are in a fixed alignment with the wheel in the vertical and lateral axis, I think. It only adjusts by sliding back and forth horizonally to account for chain tightening/adjustment. The pads are not adjustable, they just slide in.

Do you have any information on the computer alignment specifications that you refer to? How does the shop use the computer to align the wheel? Does your local KTM dealer do computer alignments? How much?

The bike is brand new. The wheel and disc have not been dropped, dinged, bent, hit, or nicked.

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Adding weights to the rim to eliminate wiggling/shaking due to uneven weight distribution is called "balancing". This is a pretty easy job for a good tire shop.

Bending the rim back to a perfect circle by tensioning/releasing spokes called "alignment" or "adjustment". This is another matter, may take hours and needs some more skill. (Notice, this means that as looking from behind the wheel slightly wiggles left-to-right-and-back while turning around. It should never be out of "real" circle shape, or oval, which is even more difficult to repair, if possible).

"Wheel alignment" is also commonly referred to adjusting the rear wheel to be perfectly in-line with the longitudinal axis of the bike. (It can not be out of vertical axis, or if so, the whole rear suspension is seriously damaged / twisted and usually needs replacement).

None of these problems will result in brake squeak - and I can't imagine your spanking new bike has any of these already developed :thumbsup:

Relax and enjoy the ride - you haven't messed up anything. Your rear brake is squeaking to you: "I'm here, happy, working and fully enjoying this" :ride:

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