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BMW for Dual Sport

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I have not been on a dual sport ride yet but I am very eager to go. Now my buddy is all excited to go as well. He has a BMW F 650 GS and there are all kinds of stuff for it for the off road. Will his bike be able to go on a dual sport ride if he takes all the easy routes?

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Tom let me know if you want a Graphix kit for your bike. Mike Weed is partners in some new company like Ibon's. Dark Identity, he can do whatever you want on it.

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Jay, Yes some rides are easy enough to use Adventure bikes on, Not all. you have to contact the ride promoter to see. I really depends on the riders skill level too. Just pay attention or ,,,,,,,

brokektm.jpg

Weed still owes me big for a bunch of Mugen parts, over the years, I'll take you up on that offer

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The biggest things are suspension set up and tires, I have 2 set of rims, when running the full knobbies I will truck the bike to the area, I run dot MT-21s and just don't want to wear them down. The bike are set up so soft that it hurts ground clearance when riding off road. The weight of the bike make going down hill exciting, just slow down. The newer "dual sports" are made stronger so bending items by just riding them is not an issue. That 650 BMW doesn't have anything over a Honda "L" or Kawa, still is in the 350lb plus range and because being a single cylinder is not a good high speed street bike (75-85 mph cruising).

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Jay,

We're including routes on this years LA-Barstow-Vegas ride for the bigger bikes. You can do fire roads and jeep trails or a combination of street and dirt.

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LOL, oh man that brings back memories..........or nightmares. That's me on the left pointing to the missing head, Don's next to me and the owner looking on.

I'm the coordinator for this years LA-Barstow-Vegas ride. This pic is why I wanted to include a special route just for the big adventure bikes. Nice, wide, flat, scenic fire roads and back country highways. The guy in the pic had that BMW on a 36 inch single track trail that has a sheer rock face on the...guess which side. He had his rollchart in his backpack, his GPS was lost miles before this mishap.

Tom, if you could send me a copy of that pic I sure would appreciate it. I think that needs to go on my office wall.

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Since I have never ridden in Kalifornia, I can't comment on local conditions but I expect they would include SAND, followed by more sand, then some more. I personally would never try to ride very far in the loose stuff on a pig of a F650, regardless of how it was set up.

The Washington State dual sport rides are really set up for lightweight bikes. You do see a few Ural sidecar rigs and a big GS or 950 Adv occasionnally, but the VAST majority of the entries are plated dirt bikes or lightweight dual sports.

That's not to say that there aren't easier rides out there - call the club and ask to speak with one of the ride organisers. For example, there is a DS ride in western OR that is pretty cobby, and intended for dirt bikes, followed the next day by a "Scaredy Cat" version for more street oriented machinery and sidecar rigs, which only goes over paved and gravel roads.

Lighter is better any time you get off pavement. You will enjoy ANY of these DS rides MUCH more on a sub-300 pound machine.

John Davies

Spokane WA

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"One picture worth thousand words."

I have long wondered about how well a BMW "boxer" might fare in the rough-and-tumble of unknown, rugged trails. The picture, of an opposed-twin's head hardware actually MISSING from a crash confirms some possibilities, to me.

Surely, the thorough BMW Teutonic engineers design bolt-on crash guards for the heads and cylinders offering some protection (absent in the photo; reckon the owner declined the option).

Also, in a spill, seems like a possibility might exist for the protruding engine sides to "catch" on a rock or stump, and cause some interesting ballistic changes to a falling bike's trajectory.

Don't think this post stems from "BMW envy;" only, I think the smart money favors lightweight and narrow, surviving challenging trails.

Finally, I guess really, "There ain't no all-purpose nothin'."

Really appreciate the image, answering a "what if?" question about the BMW boxers in the wild.

No offense intended to BMW riders who have logged thousands of off-road miles without any similar mishap.

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To further explain the picture the BMW rider wasn't following the roll chart and elected to just follow the riders ahead of him. Unfortunately the riders ahead of him choose the hard way option. Several riders passed him by with just a wave, luckily Keith came across him and towed him to a dirt rode where the sweep riders arranged by radio for a pick-up truck to meet him and give him a ride to Barstow. As for it being a nightmare I found it more rewarding to help this rider than the actual ride itself, but then I wasn't the one who ended up upside down in a bush!

Another thing about BMW riders is they have the ability to go out and purchase a KTM the next day!

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I had a Dakar for about 6K miles, fuel consumption is awesome, reliabilty for me was too, and it could go everywhere I aimed it.

36447926-M-1.jpg

The key was that you had to pick your line, use your pegs to control it, and ride with friends that were willing to wait, loved that bike, miss it too...

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