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'99 GG 270 Good bike for beginner?

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Hey guys, I may have found a '99 GG 270 for sale in my area. I haven't actually seen the bike yet but it is described as very good condition. If you read my earlier thread then you know that I'm clueless when it comes to trials machines. So, would this be a good choice for a play/trials machine for a beginner? And what would be a fair price for this model in very good condition with no mechanical issues? Parts availability issues? Any particular problems with these bikes? Any input would be appreciated.

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My guess would be from $2,000 up to $2,700. That's a sweet bike and very easy to ride. Check the rear shock and see if both front and rear suspensions go down almost equally when you push down in the center of the bike. If so, jump on it before I do. :thumbsup:

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My guess would be from $2,000 up to $2,700. That's a sweet bike and very easy to ride. Check the rear shock and see if both front and rear suspensions go down almost equally when you push down in the center of the bike. :thumbsup:

Good, so the price is in line and I was hoping it would be a good choice. I've read enough to think the Pro probably isn't for me and I get the impression that the earlier TXTs woud be much better for a beginner. By checking the shock I assume you mean for leaks, bent shaft, ect? What does the check you recommended above tell me? And what does it mean if it doesn't go down evenly? Binding linkage or something else? It looks pretty good from what I can see in the pictures but of course you can't really tell much from a picture. He's also including a spare rear fender even though the stock one looks fine. I'm seriously considering this bike but something came up at work and I have to go out of town Sat. morning and be gone atleast a week. I was planning to go have a look before that came about so hopefully it'll still be available when I get back. If so, I'll go have a look and see if we can put a deal together. It's the first one I've found that's what I'm looking for within a reasonable driving distance.

Anything else I should check out or be on the lookout for? I know to check wheel bearings, steering head bearings, swingarm pivot, fork seals, leaking shock, and just general appearance and condition of everything but I've always been a four stroke guy for the most part and don't really know much about ascertaining the general health of a 2-smoke engine. I know to listen for piston slap and bad crank bearings but having never really listened to a healthy GG engine I probably won't know normal sounds from the sound of death. Is there any particular tell-tale signs that will give me an indication of how much use the bike has seen?

Thanks

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Most of the common things like fork seals and such are nothing to concern yourself about.

For the suspension, if it's smooth and even it's good. Trials Bikes have very little rebound damping so don't think that is a flaw.

Rear shock can run above $300 to replace and of course, engine items are expensive. New cylinder and piston somewhere above $400 to $600. But in the last 25 years of riding, I've only replaced one cylinder and that was my fault. Water pumps, tires, mufflers, cooling fans and sometimes handle bars and levers while learning are about the extent of parts that you might go through in a 2 or 3 year period.

Wheel bearings and steering head bearings are minor items but can indicate the level of care.

Tires last a long time but are not cheap. Most rear tires are over $100 but can come on sale once in awhile. For play riding, you can expect 2 solid years on a rear tire or more. I've heard as much as $150 for a Michelin and as low as $68 for a Dunlop rear tire.

For a "Dirt Bike" they are really cheap to maintain and really cheap on gas! Burning one tank (3 liters) will be about all the exercise you can stand for a day which can translate to 4 hours. I get about 12 miles of difficult single track riding on one liter. :thumbsup:

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2PLY,

thanks for the help and advice. It sounds like this bike is exactly what I'm looking for. A bike thats suited for a beginner while still being capable enough for lower level competion if I ever decide to give it a try. Well, it looks like I won't be going out of town Sat afterall. So... I may just treat myself tomorrow and buy a new toy. After the day I had today I need something to get my mind off of things. I'm considering going up for a look, with trailer and cash, and if it looks good I may just make an offer and see what happens.

You mention gas and that raises yet another question. I've read of some people using race or AV gas in their trials bikes. In your experience, is this required for the '99 270 to prevent detonation or will premium pump gas suffice? Also since this is a used bike I probably won't be getting a manual or anything with it. I'll be wanting to go through it and change tranny fluid, coolant and just basically go through the basic maintanence items. What type of fluid is recommended for the gearbox? Would it still be possible to get a service manual, in english, for these bikes?

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2PLY,

thanks for the help and advice. It sounds like this bike is exactly what I'm looking for. A bike thats suited for a beginner while still being capable enough for lower level competion if I ever decide to give it a try. Well, it looks like I won't be going out of town Sat afterall. So... I may just treat myself tomorrow and buy a new toy. After the day I had today I need something to get my mind off of things. I'm considering going up for a look, with trailer and cash, and if it looks good I may just make an offer and see what happens.

You mention gas and that raises yet another question. I've read of some people using race or AV gas in their trials bikes. In your experience, is this required for the '99 270 to prevent detonation or will premium pump gas suffice? Also since this is a used bike I probably won't be getting a manual or anything with it. I'll be wanting to go through it and change tranny fluid, coolant and just basically go through the basic maintanence items. What type of fluid is recommended for the gearbox? Would it still be possible to get a service manual, in english, for these bikes?

Don't underestimate the bike. In 1999, it was state of the art and is what the World Champ riders were using. Still much more capable than most of us. Just one of the cool things about Trials and Trials bikes.... World class machines that are docile enough for a beginner.

I mix 2 gallons of AV-Gas to 3 gallons of Premium Auto Gas, but you might start with Premium Auto Gas and see how it works. I can't recommend AV-Gas but I use it.

I use GM Auto Trak II (automatic transfer case ATF) but in the past we have used 30 weight Motor Oil and ATF

The manual may still be available in PDF form on the Net. Check the Gas Gas USA web site for the link to the Factory data.

http://www.gasgas.com/

There is a lot of information and tips on that site but it's a little cluttered.

I know there was a free maintenance DVD made by the USA importer for all new owners. It's free and copies might be available. Maybe call Lewisport USA and talk to Adrian about getting a copy of the DVD for your year and where to get a copy of the PDF version of the manual. I know they exist.

http://www.lewisportusa.com/

Adrian and Mandy Lewis

PO Box 611

Copperopolis, CA

95228

209-785-6878

505-280-8022 (cell)

(8:00 am to 4:00 pm Pacific time)

email us (info@Lewisportusa.com)

:thumbsup:

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I've got a friend with a TXT Pro who is basically a novice class rider. Last time we were out we switched bikes and he didn't want to give me my Sherco back. I found the TXT to be a much "sharper tool" and less forgiving to heavy handed riding.

That said. Without him ever riding mine he'd been perfectly happy with the Gas Gas and still is.

In reality, trials bikes are so easy to ride and so much fun that anyone can enjoy even the most cutting edge machine without having to be a champ level competitor.

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