Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

To hone or NOT to hone?

Recommended Posts

I have an '05 crf 450 that is due for a top end change and I have been told both to hone, and not to hone. I don't have any issues with the bike, just doing maintenance. Should I inspect the cylinder head when I take it off tonight, and if it has any damage, then hone? ...And if it looks free of any marks or damage spots, just clean'er up and slap it back together?

BTW, the bike is stock, if that matters.

thanks for any info...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have an '05 crf 450 that is due for a top end change and I have been told both to hone, and not to hone. I don't have any issues with the bike, just doing maintenance. Should I inspect the cylinder head when I take it off tonight, and if it has any damage, then hone? ...And if it looks free of any marks or damage spots, just clean'er up and slap it back together?

BTW, the bike is stock, if that matters.

thanks for any info...

if you want the rings to seat correctly you will hone it every time you do a top end---this is standard procedure for any cylinder and ring set up in any engine ( you must brake the glaze )

then you will assembly it clean and dry and turn the motor over dry 50 - 60 times and then add your 20 oz of engine oil , fire it up get it hot at high idle and go race ----no foo foo brake in crap :thumbsup:

and you will disassemble the head and glass bead it all spotless like new ,

inspect the guides for wear ( replace as you need )--re-cut the seats and install new valves, springs and seals and make sure the installed spring height is 1.450" ,

if you want it to work , it must be cleaner than new and all set up :ride:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kelstr, is a bead hone the correct one to use ??

Hey Kevin, you doing a top end? A bead hone works fine to break the glaze on a used cylinder. Just remember to lubricate the hone properly. I always assemble top ends dry too. I only oil the wrist pin bearing.

Let's go ride!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yo Cam,

Yeah, I've got a 13.5:1 Vertex and a HC stage 1 to install in the very near future. I'm gonna try to run that G.P. race at Village this weekend....I'm out on MX practice until the heat lets up a little !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yo Cam,

Yeah, I've got a 13.5:1 Vertex and a HC stage 1 to install in the very near future. I'm gonna try to run that G.P. race at Village this weekend....I'm out on MX practice until the heat lets up a little !

LOL, as long as you are moving, the heat isn't so bad. That GP sounds like the hot ticket for triple digit temps! :thumbsup:

I'm riding tonight if I can get my ducks in a row. It's only getting up to 96 today.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
if you want the rings to seat correctly you will hone it every time you do a top end---this is standard procedure for any cylinder and ring set up in any engine ( you must brake the glaze )

then you will assembly it clean and dry and turn the motor over dry 50 - 60 times and then add your 20 oz of engine oil , fire it up get it hot at high idle and go race ----no foo foo brake in crap :thumbsup:

and you will disassemble the head and glass bead it all spotless like new ,

inspect the guides for wear ( replace as you need )--re-cut the seats and install new valves, springs and seals and make sure the installed spring height is 1.450" ,

if you want it to work , it must be cleaner than new and all set up :ride:

good info, thanks. Is the procedure for inspecting the guides in the honda manual? I was previously told (again, just looking for info) that I shouldn't have to replace my valves the first time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
good info, thanks. Is the procedure for inspecting the guides in the honda manual? I was previously told (again, just looking for info) that I shouldn't have to replace my valves the first time.

yes the book calls for 0.2186" intake guide,

0.1989" exhaust guide and ,----but i find they can bell mouth badly .

i like them tighter than the stock spec .

CV4 has some really good guides that are tighter and really hold the valve straight.

its up to you to run the valves again ,----i have done it when testing the stock stuff on my own stuff ,

and i have gotten some unreal time on the stock valves,

but i would always replace the springs , ---the stock spring gets week and kills the valve ,

and yes the 4" ball hone of 280 grit works great,

i hone while running water in the cylinder and hone with soap and hot water,

works great ! :thumbsup:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay, I'm right in the middle of a top end rebuild. I have lots of hours on my '03, but the cylinder walls look perfect. There are no scratches and you can still see the swirls from the factory. This is the first time I've heard anything about honing a cylinder in this nice of shape.

I don't alway react to everything I hear on TT, but you guys are freaking me out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Okay, I'm right in the middle of a top end rebuild. I have lots of hours on my '03, but the cylinder walls look perfect. There are no scratches and you can still see the swirls from the factory. This is the first time I've heard anything about honing a cylinder in this nice of shape.

I don't alway react to everything I hear on TT, but you guys are freaking me out.

They are plated with Nikasil aren't they? If so, all you need to do is take a scotch brite pad and some sopay water and scrub the cylinder to break the glaze. Simple and easy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Okay, I'm right in the middle of a top end rebuild. I have lots of hours on my '03, but the cylinder walls look perfect. There are no scratches and you can still see the swirls from the factory. This is the first time I've heard anything about honing a cylinder in this nice of shape.

I don't alway react to everything I hear on TT, but you guys are freaking me out.

The plating in the cylinder is so hard that you cant hurt it. It really needs to be honed to clean up the glaze otherwise the ring will never bite enough to seat properly. It'll flutter in the land and do all kinds of wierd shit.

You can buy a hone at Autozone or most elcheapo auto stores that will do what you need to do.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
They are plated with Nikasil aren't they? If so, all you need to do is take a scotch brite pad and some sopay water and scrub the cylinder to break the glaze. Simple and easy.

well if you wanted to take a week and work it you might rid some of the glaze --but doubtful,

all cylinders need to be dull , rough and re- crosshatched after honing in order to have a chance of seating the rings,

assembly dry ( no oil at all except the wrist pin )

the nikalsil is very hard to brake the glaze on , i work at it under soapy water running the hone from both sides in a drill and it can take 2 min a side or more ,

some times i will use different grit and style hones for a plateau hone finish,

this is just what you gotta do if you want a ring seal and to have the top end stay dry :thumbsup:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I took mine to a local shop, they honed it while I waited and only charged me $15.00. :thumbsup:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The information provided to me was warm soap and water. nothing else. I trust what kelstr says would be safe but Im gonna go with what my motor guy tells me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×