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SM or street bike?

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Need a road bike. Or least my life would be easier with one.

-Load bike in Tacoma, drive to location and ride bike back - 30 - 60 miles?

-Ok (or better) on freeway

-not too heavy

-factory license plate

-enough power to be safe but does not need to have a lot more

-fun in the twisties would be good

-reliable, fairly low maintenance, 3000 miles a year?

-does not need to be new, looks "just ok" would be fine.

-ok enough to go to the mountains on a day trip a few times a year - 9 hour ride?

Up until now the sv650 was looking good, then I read about SM bikes, but I have no clue. You people are the experts.

At this point it takes multiple people and vehicles to accomplish what I am doing and it is getting old but that will still be available for bad weather. I have a bunch of dirt bikes and a klr250 which I don't like on the freeway because it gets blown around too much and I hate the kick start for the road but I could make it more stable by changing a few things. Happy to give more info but this is getting long...

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SV's are sweet bikes. i had one before my ZX7R. i loved it. not crazy fast but fun to ride. i kinda wish i would have gotten a SV1000.

P.S. over heating the front brake is easy though. you might wanna up grade, if you get it.

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Owning both a DRZ setup for Supermoto and an 06 SV1000S (which has seen better days, like when it moved under its own power and actually rolled on wheels before the brother + ride + oak tree incident)....

I must say I wouldn't want to do 9 hours on either really. But the SV would be my pick for a long ride by far. Much more comfy for freeway duty.

However for actual bike enjoyment the SM by far. Track days. Twisty mountain roads. Or daily commute. Loads of fun. Nothing like it.

I actually bought the SV so I wasn't using my DRZ as my daily driver. I have a ton of money into the SM and its too sweet of a bike to rack so many miles on it. Save it for the track more.

60 miles on the SM is about the tolerable limit. Get some mountain bike shorts and maybe a bit more. Any more and it can get pretty tiring. I did 300+ miles in one day once and I thought I was gonna die. (sac - reno - sac)

Edit :

Oh ya and a couple more things.... don't get me wrong. I used to be kind of anti-sportbike but I really enjoy both bikes a ton. They each have a purpose. The SV is incredibly fast and there is a rare time and place for that. I mean 70 MPH in first gear and whats better is how fast it gets there, shift into second and holy crap your bookin 90+..... The SV1000 tops out around 150. I haven't even come close nor do I need to.

Both get a lot of attention. The 06 Blue SV is a killer lookin bike. But all the sport bike guys even take a second look and give me a thumbsup when they see the supermoto.... because its so unique and not even street legal really.

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I don't know...we are in the same place. Wanting a street legal SM really bad, but can't quite part with the R6 yet......That smooth fast power is something I don't think I'll ever be able to let go of. But I also crave the incredible funness of a street legal SM....we'll end up with both...plus the race bikes.

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I don't know...we are in the same place. Wanting a street legal SM really bad, but can't quite part with the R6 yet......That smooth fast power is something I don't think I'll ever be able to let go of. But I also crave the incredible funness of a street legal SM....we'll end up with both...plus the race bikes.

I used to own both, an R6 and a street legal WR400! now its a Husky SMR510! but I don't plan on doing any 1hour+ long rides. I dumped the R6 because by the time I got my adrenaline rush I was usually pushing 130mph and while on the brakes I kept thinking "the only place for this kind of speed is on the track" (I'm an x-roadracer) and believe me the 510 has some pull, but it just tops out at 100mph. and mile long wheelies are kinda fun too, specially at 40mph. :thumbsup: and I am taking it to BeaverRun today to get my roadracing fix :ride:

th_SMR510rr.jpg

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I can´t vouch for SMs--yet.

But I´ve been doing all my riding on an SV650S and have put on about 15000 miles in three years. It´s a hell of a bike. Really useful power, great sound, and good looks. It´s been dead reliable, 03+ has great fuel injection, and the services are simple affairs since there is no bodywork to deal with. In the S configuration, wind protection is excellent but the clip-ons are a pain. Riding in a relatively straight line, 4 hours and I´m definately ready to be done. But in the mountains, 9 hour days were tough but a lot of fun.

However, I recently started using my dad´s Bandit 1200S to run long-distance errands, and I vote it better for long distance. Better riding position and fine wind protection, plus the power is just-twist-for-passing without being wheelie dangerous.

Sorry if that´s an SM hijack--the two cents I have, I give.

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Excellent feedback - thanks!

Seems either could work - especially if a really good deal presents itself.

Don't think I want to get anything much heavier than a sv650 (375 lbs?)

more info:

Where I want the bike to excel is a 1 hour commute. Leave the pick up on the job site and use it for getting supplies, etc and commuting 3 day to a week then reverse the process / take it to the next job. That way keep the miles off the truck, have a bit more fun, and get there quicker since these jobs are usually at the end of twisty roads. But it would involve 30 or so miles of freeway - usually fast freeway with potentially strong cross winds and bridge travel (SF bay area).

The 9 hour occasional trip would only be for occasional fun and no hurry - SF bay area to the mountains, Napa, Marin, Skyline blvd, etc. Lots of stops not a problem. My rump has been on rock hard klr250 and crf230 (w/plate) seats for hours at a time and never had a problem - just too much fun or too stupid. I could take the DOT knobbies off the klr250, and do several other things to make it more street capable but it will never be a 30 mile freeway machine to me.

I do have a 2006 TE250 with a plate also but want to keep the miles off it and in its off road configuration. Lot of SM bikes to choose from but have not ridden either an SM or a sv650. I test rode a TC450 and in exactly 10 seconds knew that for what I wanted the gears were too close and engine a bit too much hence the TE250 (SWEET bike). Probably the more upright riding position of the naked model would be a preference, no need (or want) to go faster than fast freeway speeds 85?

Question - especially for those that have ridden both - would you say there is a significant difference between how an SM compares to the SV650 or similar in strong cross winds or on long bridges?

.

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The DRZ is going to get knocked around a little more with the wind. But an hour commute can be tolerated fairly easily. I have ridden in some crazy wind too. Depends on the street bike though?.... The wind protection on the 650 is going to be pretty much the same as the SM as in non-existant. Only the weight and lower ride height is going to make it a bit more steady. The 650S model on the other hand actually offers some decent protection.

Based on your thoughts of power requirement and everything else you would be a good candidate for a DRZ SM model. If you think a 450 is too much power for what you want.... I am sure you could find a local TT member that would let you test ride one. There are plenty of guys that have them and they are really rock solid. I wouldn't discount the new Huskys but seeing how you have test rode one and didn't like it for your needs. :thumbsup:

If its a vote between SM and SV650 (Not the 650S) then I would still say SM any day. They are too similar (upright position etc.) and when it comes down to it the SM is just going to be way more fun.

Example A....

One time I missed a right turn into a buisness parking lot on a seperated road. So instead of taking a U turn at the next light I turned into the next parking lot.... doublebacked to the edge of the lot then proceded to hop the curb onto the grass and go on the grass in front of a few buisnesses over into the correct parking lot. :cry:

Example B.....

When going to local buisnesses say for lunch. I pull up to the curb as if to park in a parking spot. Then hop the curb and park right in front of the front entrance (glass) so I can keep an eye on it. Or say hop a curb and park under a tree in a landscaped area.

Example C.....

My first ride ever going from a dual sport to my SM setup I dragged my footpeg on the very first street I turned onto as I was getting off the highway. Also you wouldn't believe the looks you get when you fly through a light at a freeway offramp turning with your full leathers / gear on and your foot out with the bike totally sideways. :ride:

Example D....

The wheelies.... Oh my the wheelies.

OK get my drift? I'm telling you the SM is just gonna be more fun. You won't regret it a bit. Most of those curb hopping antics you just aren't going to be able to do with the SV.

When I bought my SV1000S I was considering the 650 first. (Fuel economy). Then I realized..... my DRZ450 could probably even kill the SV1000 in the 0-60 dept. So I decided it had to be the 1000 over the 650.

Like I said if it were between those 2 SM any day.

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I used to own both, an R6 and a street legal WR400! now its a Husky SMR510! but I don't plan on doing any 1hour+ long rides. I dumped the R6 because by the time I got my adrenilin rush I was usually pushing 130mph and while on the brakes I kept thinking "the only place for this kind of speed is on the track" (I'm an x-roadracer) and believe me the 510 has some pull, but it just tops out at 100mph. and mile long wheelies are kinda fun too, specially at 40mph. :thumbsup: and I am taking it to BeaverRun today to get my roadracing fix :ride:

That's very reassuring. Thanks for the feedback! I know we want to get Huskys when we make the leap...(yeah, there's two of us...two R6's only to gain 2 street legal SM's....good thing we work hard!)

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Based on your thoughts of power requirement and everything else you would be a good candidate for a DRZ SM model. If you think a 450 is too much power for what you want....

Sorry. Not a good poster / writer.

The TE250 is a trail bike with a plate to me, and in the tight trails there seems no need for a bunch of CCs on a hot day. What I am looking for now is a road bike so displacement is not an issue, it does sound like SM would be better.

Anyone else regarding cross winds / bridges?

I followed your thread about your brother - very interesting! Did the insurance come through?

.

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In the S configuration, wind protection is excellent but the clip-ons are a pain.
Question - what are "clip-ons"?

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You might like one of the bigger "comfy" converted dualsports. XR650, DR650? Niether would make the best track bike, but for playing around, commuting, 30 miles of highway...

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Question - what are "clip-ons"?
Clip ons are the bars. They are idependant of each other and consist of a clamp that goes over the fork tubes under the top clamp and have a bar sticking out as a handlebar.

The SV S model has clip ons just like any other sportbike GSXR etc. They put the bars down pretty low with quite a bit of sweep for that sportbike feel.

Sorry. Not a good poster / writer.

I followed your thread about your brother - very interesting! Did the insurance come through?

Your posts are fine by the way. I guess I just missed that small bit. No big deal.

As for the insurance on the SV yes I got about $7k and I kept the bike salvage. I had to come up with $1500 or so out of pocket to finish paying off the loan ($8499 total) because I am required by DMV to surrender the title and license plates and they give me a salvage certificate (new title) for the bike because it was totalled. Before I can get it re-registered it has to go through a light inspection etc. and then the CHP does a safety inspection and I have to have a bill of sale on all the parts I used to fix it to verify they aren't stolen etc.

I bought an entire 06 GSXR750 front end for it which is really trick. It now has USD forks that are all black. I also bought a GSXR wheel to go with. I also found an aftermarket GSXR front fender in the YBA blue color for my model. The stock fenders only come in black. I just won a new cylinder head / cylinder / cams (one entire cylinder assembly) on ebay for $100 last night!!! That leaves radiator and front exhaust header and an 05 GSXR600 top clamp so I can use my steering lock with my new front end. I also have the full fairings brand new in the box waiting to be installed.

There is light at the end of the tunnel. My SV will be running in no time and better than ever. :thumbsup:

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SM is cool no doubt if Ricky Carmichael is lapping the field, but most SM riders ride a few miles around empty parking lots on Sunday, tops and then they get a license and sell it with 200 miles on the clock. Street bikes are where its at, and can get things done. Supermoto is just keeping tech up for street bikes legally.

Check out BMW F650. They can cruise all day long at 100mph if no cops, handle great, and unlike performance Jap bikes, have journal bearings which last 3 or 4 times as long with not significant performance difference. And they are BMW too, something that will last forever if maintained, and dealers will always support any year model. F650 has been same engine since 1992, added efi in 2000, and Bombardier, now Can-Am atv DS-650 is same exact carbed engine as pre-2000 BMW F-650 from 2000-now (I have a 97 F650 ST(reet)).

You will need a gel seating pad, and some other things but you will learn. I wish Thumper Talk was more street oriented, but they may be restricted legally what they can sell. So SM is a good way to legally sell street performance parts. Reliability is number one. Torque over horsepower first, and then add horsepower externally in stages so don't ruin the reliable torque.

Street Thumps Rule! Just look out for the cars talking on their cell phones. And don't forget a dual french air horn for safety!

Sorry. Not a good poster / writer.

The TE250 is a trail bike with a plate to me, and in the tight trails there seems no need for a bunch of CCs on a hot day. What I am looking for now is a road bike so displacement is not an issue, it does sound like SM would be better.

Anyone else regarding cross winds / bridges?

I followed your thread about your brother - very interesting! Did the insurance come through?

.

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SM is cool no doubt if Ricky Carmichael is lapping the field, but most SM riders ride a few miles around empty parking lots on Sunday, tops and then they get a license and sell it with 200 miles on the clock. Street bikes are where its at, and can get things done. Supermoto is just keeping tech up for street bikes legally.

Check out BMW F650. They can cruise all day long at 100mph if no cops, handle great, and unlike performance Jap bikes, have journal bearings which last 3 or 4 times as long with not significant performance difference. And they are BMW too, something that will last forever if maintained, and dealers will always support any year model. F650 has been same engine since 1992, added efi in 2000, and Bombardier, now Can-Am atv DS-650 is same exact carbed engine as pre-2000 BMW F-650 from 2000-now (I have a 97 F650 ST(reet)).

You will need a gel seating pad, and some other things but you will learn. I wish Thumper Talk was more street oriented, but they may be restricted legally what they can sell. So SM is a good way to legally sell street performance parts. Reliability is number one. Torque over horsepower first, and then add horsepower externally in stages so don't ruin the reliable torque.

Street Thumps Rule! Just look out for the cars talking on their cell phones. And don't forget a dual french air horn for safety!

Thats some very poor assumtions you make there.... I for one have logged over 16k miles on my street legal Supermoto bike. And Supermoto parts have nothing to do with street bikes what-so-ever. Find a single part made for SM that has anything to do with street bikes? The only thing you might be able to use on both is any selection of front master cylinders depending on your braking configuration. The rest is totally Supermoto specific.

Most people who have Supermotos have other bikes including street bikes. Most will tell you they love thier Supermoto.... many because its so much fun to make street bikes look bad on windy roads. :thumbsup:

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SM's have big nostalgia factor as well. Its like a time machine for me. Now its (barely) legal for me to be riding a dirtbike down the street. I grew up on dirt bikes (ie. there's no little kids riding street bikes around their back yards or on the trails with their dads). Point being, if you grew up on dirtbikes, a SM is like a homecoming. Its like being back on summer vacation.

It took me a bit to get used to my street bike when I first got it, but the SM was easy. Less weight, less money to fix, great power. Depends on where you live too. The SM will outperform the streetbikes more and more as road conditions decrease. Find a dirt road and you're in heaven. Since you already have a street bike, this may not matter, but I had a millin dirtbike hours under my belt before I started street riding.

As for wind, I've been blown around a little on the highway before, but nothing you can't handle. I can't speak for long bridges, but I bet the big trucks have more of a problem than you would.

There's the dual factor as well. With a SM you get a 2 for 1. Convert a trailbike, and with a 10min swap of the tires, you can be blasting through the trails or downtown traffic.

I have a street bike as well. For longer rides I choose that, but if the buddies are staying fairly local (within 100 miles) and no one is setting up for a light speed ride, I take the SM.

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