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How to drain my coolant?

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how do i do this? Is there some drain plug, or something like that, Owners manual says nada...

thanks in advance..

-patch

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More importantly...

When refilling, be sure to bleed the air out of the system, by removing the beeder bolt on the water neck and the bleeder bolt on the top of the rad.

Both bolts should be removed as you begin to refill the cooling system. Replace the bleeder bolt on the water neck (thermostat housing on the front of the engine), as soon as coolant begins to flow from it, and then the one on the top of the rad as the system becomes completely full.

This is critical.

:thumbsup:

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More importantly...

When refilling, be sure to bleed the air out of the system, by removing the beeder bolt on the water neck and the bleeder bolt on the top of the rad.

Both bolts should be removed as you begin to refill the cooling system. Replace the bleeder bolt on the water neck (thermostat housing on the front of the engine), as soon as coolant begins to flow from it, and then the one on the top of the rad as the system becomes completely full.

This is critical.

:thumbsup:

INDEED! :ride: Air pockets = overheating! :cry:

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Doh! I didnt do these things, But i went to a trackday yesterday, And it was fine, Never overheated..

I Guess im fine?

Thanks guys..

-patch

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Personally I wouldn't take the chance...

If you didn't bleed the air out of the system as you were refilling, you'd be wise to drain the coolant, and refill it again and bleed the air out as you go.

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Wouldn't it be all gone by now? Also how do i bleed it out?

-patch

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It's up to you if you want to risk there being air trapped in the system, but if it was my bike, I'd drain it and refill it, making sure to properly bleed the air out through the two bleeders as you go, this time.

The lower bleeder bolt plug is on the waterneck (t-stat housing), in front of the engine, the upper one is on the top of the left side rad.

Drain the coolant, remove the bleeder plug bolts from both bleeders, start refilling, plug the lower bleeder as coolant starts to flow from it, and plug the top one once the system becomes full.

It's ten minutes work, tops. Well worth the peace of mind.

:thumbsup:

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It only holds about a quart of coolant, so it won't take long to change and then you'll be sure you have no air in the system.

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is it bad just to run water?

-patch

A: always use distilled water,as tap water will deposit the minerals into the cooling system and degrade it.

B: sure you can, but you will have a lower boiling point then a 50/50 mix with coolant, and you'll have a significantly higher freeze point.

As for getting trapped air form the rad.. it's probable gone if you ran it.. and the the rad should be a bit low. The air escapes as you ride, bounce, ect.

BUT,, you can check without draining the rads.. Fill the right rad to capacity. open the bleeder on the water neck,, burp the trapped air (if any),open the left rad bleeder, burp the air if any.. Top off the right rad. lean the bike over to the left as far as you can. you may hear a gurgle.. if so,, that is some trapped air. lean the bike back up. the air will go to the right rad..then lean it to the right,then back up. Top off the rad.. and go ride :thumbsup:

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I've rideing several times since then.. But ill do as you say..

Where is the bleeder on the water neck?

thanks!

-patch

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I've rideing several times since then.. But ill do as you say..

Where is the bleeder on the water neck?

thanks!

-patch

Like I said, I'dbet you find the right rad a bit low, and no air.. But it's worth the 5 min to check.. The water neck bleeder is right on top.

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Don't you love how you put the drain pan probably directly under the right side of the case then dove for it as the green juice shot out about two feet past your pan?

r

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"is it bad just to run water?"

You can also run a mix of distilled water and Redline WaterWetter.

Just plain water on its own has amazingly superior heat transfer properties, far superior to glycol-based coolants. Water has almost 2.5 times greater thermal conductivity compared to glycol coolants. So why not run water alone? Cause:

1) You can achieve better boiling/freezing point performance from a 50/50 mix and/or achieve better heat transfer ability with WaterWetter

2) Water sucks at preventing rust,corrosion, and electrolysis in your cooling system. Aluminum is a very electroactive metal.

3) lack of lubrication for waterpump seals

While WaterWetter doesn't raise the boiling point or lower the freezing point of water, it increases the heat transfer properties of water by lowering the surface tension of water. Thus the water is "wetter".

Surface tension of water = 58.9 Dynes/cm2

Surface tension of WaterWetter = 28.3 Dynes/cms

(Measured @ 100 degrees Celsius)

With WaterWetter, to raise the boiling point of water, you could increase the PSI of the cooling system (higher PSI Cap) to extend the boiling point closer to the 50/50 Glycol mix boiling point level. Coupled with all the benefits of better heat transfer = lower running stabilized cooling system temperatures

No I do not work for RedLine, I'm just a believer. All of this stuff is on their website so feel free to check out any of this info.

Stuff comes in a 12oz bottle which treats 12-16 quarts, directions say 4-5 cap fulls per quart.

:thumbsup:

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