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How to learn a trackstand

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How do you learn to do a trackstand or standstill? I'm not sure what it's called on a motorcycle. I don't ride trials, but I like to practice different things to improve what little riding ability I have.

I found plenty of tips on the web for learning it on a bicycle, but nothing for motorcycles. After lots of practice, I've managed to master the technique on a bicycle, but I still can't do it on a motorcycle.

Any ideas would be appreciated.

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Trackstands are for velodromes. It's just called balancing in place on a trials bike. If you can do it on a bicycle, you can on a motorcycle. You just need more practice and it will come.

Keep the front brake on and keep the wheel turned to one side. Much harder to balance with the front wheel straight ahead. Let some air out of your tires. Around five pounds on a trials bike. If you start to fall towards one side, move the front wheel towards the direction of the fall, to catch yourself. Practice on level ground with good friction, i.e., dirt, grass, rough concrete. Smooth surfaces are harder to learn on.

Step up on the opposite peg opposite of the direction of the front wheel. "Wheel turned to the left, step up on the right peg." It is also easier with the motor running, but you should be able to do this in your yard with the engine off.

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Thanks for the tips. It looks like I have my work cut out for me.

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Step up on the opposite peg opposite of the direction of the front wheel. "Wheel turned to the left, step up on the right peg."

This may have been a little confusing. With the wheel turned to the left, start with your right foot on the peg and step up onto the left peg. Just the opposite, if the wheel is to the right.

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This may have been a little confusing. With the wheel turned to the left, start with your right foot on the peg and step up onto the left peg. Just the opposite, if the wheel is to the right.

I understand what you mean. I really appreciate any input, especially since I can’t find anything on the internet about balancing in place on a motorcycle.

I should have clarified when I said I could trackstand on a bicycle. I can trackstand with the bicycle rocking back and forth slightly using the crown of the road to roll backwards. I can’t balance in place very well with the brakes locked. That’s a more difficult skill. It took me about 3 months of practicing 30 minutes per day almost every day to get to where I am today. Three months is slow, but I did manage to get there.

To me, it’s easier to break a goal up into smaller steps so you can see you’re progressing. With the bicycle, I started out by just getting it to roll slightly backwards a few times as a warm up, then slow riding for 5 minutes. At first I would travel about a block in 5 minutes. Sometimes I would do better, sometimes I would do worse. Little by little, the distance got shorter. Now I can stay in front of a driveway – about twenty feet – for 5 minutes. Really all I’m doing now that I wasn’t doing before is recognizing SOONER when I’m about to tip over and putting in the right amount of control input to stop it. My ultimate goal is to balance in place on a motorcycle. Unfortunately, it’s a different feel on a motorcycle – lower center of gravity, and different type of control input.

Even though learning to trackstand on a bicycle didn’t improve my ability to balance in place on a motorcycle, it wasn’t a complete waste of time. My ability to maneuver slowly around obstacles on a mountain bike improved tremendously, and I noticed some improvement on a motorcycle.

I think I’m going to take the baby steps approach to learning to balance in place on a motorcycle. I have a DR200SE. It’s not a trials bike, but it’s pretty nimble compared to many motorcycles, and I can legally ride it on the streets to a practice area.

Now I’m really talking about baby steps. As a warm up, I’ll try stepping up on to the bike a few times while it’s stopped. I may manage to balance all of 1 second at first. Another warm up exercise I’ll try is braking to a complete stop, (until the front shocks uncompress) and then moving forward again. Slow riding for 5 minutes is a good exercise. It’s not too long to be tiring, and as the weeks go by, I can pat myself on the back for going a shorter distance.

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The trick is to learn to do it 2 ways, with the bars turned to full lock and turning the bars the opposite way to correct. (eg: falling left, turn right to counter, and vice-versa) And also just with peg pressure when you are on a cambered hill. (falling left and weight the right peg, and vice-versa)

When you can do that for as long as you want to, watch the Ryan Young learning to ride trials video.

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I just read this again and you said you are trying to balance on a DR200.

This is a huge difference from a trials bike. All the principals are the same, but it is much harder to balance on an enduro type bike, over a real trials bike.

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I just read this again and you said you are trying to balance on a DR200.

This is a huge difference from a trials bike. All the principals are the same, but it is much harder to balance on an enduro type bike, over a real trials bike.

It still works the same no matter what you ride. Practice on whatever you got. I once was stopped by a cop for what he said was a rolling stop on a street bike. I said I stopped, but didn't put my foot down. He didn't believe me and I said I'd show him. I stopped for 10-15 secs before I had to dab my foot, and he let me go.

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It still works the same no matter what you ride. Practice on whatever you got. I once was stopped by a cop for what he said was a rolling stop on a street bike. I said I stopped, but didn't put my foot down. He didn't believe me and I said I'd show him. I stopped for 10-15 secs before I had to dab my foot, and he let me go.

Like I said, the principals are the same. If this guy is trying to balance standing up, for three or four MINUTES, like we do on trials bikes, it will be much harder on a non specific trials bike.

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All the principals are the same, but it is much harder to balance on an enduro type bike, over a real trials bike.

Getting a trials bike and participating in observed trials is an idea I've been toying with. In the meantime, I just practice things to improve my riding ability.

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