Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

HELP, I stripped a bolt out!

Recommended Posts

I was adjusting the shims after 10 hr of riding on the new engine and when I was replacing the 8 hex bolts on top of the cam caps, I stripped one out. I torqued it to spec and it just pulled! What should I do to get a bold to hold? Should I go up 1 size in bolts and just put pressure on it till it holds or get a slightly longer bolt? AAAHHHHHH! someone please help.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah I had the two short bolts in the metal cam chain guard, on the inside of the intake and exhaust journal covers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If You Did Install The Correct Bolt With The Correct Torque And It Still Striped Out You Need To Heili-coil The Hole. You Drill The Hole Over Size,tap The Hole And Install The New Thread Insert.it Will Be Stronger Than New!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dang. Well, at least I can do it while my SM wheels are in the process of switching. Dang. I do have it right though, the shorter bolts go on the inside of the intake and exhaust, cam side, right? I'm pretty meticulous about placing my bolts in a specific order, but it could have happened. My little brother was helping me, so........ maby they got mixed up. 0----0<(short bolts here)>0----0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yeah I had the two short bolts in the metal cam chain guard, on the inside of the intake and exhaust journal covers.

Wrong, the two long bolts both go in the exhaust cam carrier on the chain guide side.

Bet you stripped the exhaust carrier thread, if it was the inlet carrier you bottomed the bolt out before it was tight

You can fit a Helicoil without removing the head, just be very careful where the swarf goes.

And do a couple of oil/filter changes, along with cleaning the frame oil strainer.

Neil. :thumbsup::ride::cry:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's good news. I'm going to see if I have the correct tap downstairs. Thanks. I can't believe the stupid bolt was in the wrong place.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just out of curiosity, I put the long bolts in the right places (I don't know how they got mixed up) and I was able to tighten down all the bolts to spec. My guess is that I only stripped out the first few threads and with the proper bolt, there was enough threads to allow me to get grip with the bolt. Could I just leave it be and mess with the heli coil if it needs it later?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm no expert on the criticality of this particular assembly (I'm sure there are some here though), but if you were able to tighten the bolts to spec then I would think you're fine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd be concerned about it for sure, chase it with a rethreader (different than a tap) and see if it can help fix the f***** up threads.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you don't have the right size rethreader, I found you can buy them individually from SnapOn for pretty cheap.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would still go-ahead with the helicoil.

You need 1.5 x the diameter of thread to get full strength in aluminium, so in this case you need 9mm.

And you dont have that much left, as the original holes are only just that deep.

Neil. :thumbsup::ride::cry:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If You Did Install The Correct Bolt With The Correct Torque And It Still Striped Out You Need To Heili-coil The Hole. You Drill The Hole Over Size,tap The Hole And Install The New Thread Insert.it Will Be Stronger Than New!!!

look, whenever a hole gets stripped, you need to do the correct thing and retap it. if you don't know how, someone at your local hardware store can help. don't cheap out because something bad might happen if you do.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
look, whenever a hole gets stripped, you need to do the correct thing and retap it. if you don't know how, someone at your local hardware store can help. don't cheap out because something bad might happen if you do.

Just how do you purpose he "retaps" it so he can still use the special bolt that is required for this purpose?

Helicoil will work just fine in this case and is what I'd do. I mentioned the rethreading as something to do if he weren't going to use the helicoil

No one at the "local hardware" store is going to be helping me work on my engine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Back to the original question. Torque is 7 ft lb but you do not need that much on 6mm bolts. I recommend 60 inch pounds and if you use a torque wrench, use the right one - 0 to 100 inch pounds not a 150 ft lb wrench set to 7. If you do not use a torque wrench, tighten securely with a long handle allen wrench and it will be fine.

Bolt length - I never remember which goes where, just set them all in place so they thread in the same amount. About 9mm like Neil said.

Ok, the stripped hole- Go buy a 6mm "bottom tap" and run it in the hole to make as many good threads as you can. You may be able to tap 1 or 2 more threads before you run out of hole depth. Use a bolt without the cap in place to determine how many good threads you now have before you bottom the bolt. You want 9 to 10 turns (1 turn = 1mm) but 6 good threads will do. Now go buy a bolt a little longer and custom cut it to allow 1 unused turn. So if you measure 7 1/2 turns to bottom, cut the bolt to use 6 1/2. Assemble and tighten securely. If it tightens fully and feels solid, you are fine. If it pulls the threads, time for Helicoil repair but at least you tried. Others have had good success with this technique. This is a common mistake.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If you don't have the right size rethreader, I found you can buy them individually from SnapOn for pretty cheap.

man, i didn't know snap-on sold anything cheap!! :thumbsup:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cheap is relative to cost of repair by a different method. The term is "cost avoidance" However, you do not need a thread restorer tap in this case. That is for damaged threads. In this case the threads are gone. A bottom tap will cut a few more new good threads in the bottom of the hole. Cheap and easy when it works.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×