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Too Soft,and Too hard??

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hey,

I just put some 0.48 springs in my 06 crf,i weigh 92kg,so with stock springs it was bottoming everywhere,so as I said stiffer .48 sprigns and now running 375ml of 5 weight oil,I am also now running a 5.7 rear spring,the overall feel is a lot better than I was running,I'm now running 11 out on the compression,10 out on the rebound and I think the same on the rear?( cant remember off my head),but the forks especialy still bottom out slightly if I dont get everything right,and keep away from any harsh bumps around the track,I know they should bottom out on the worst part of the track,but I gues it's a bit easier going if they are just a fraction away from bottoming?

but yeah...I was thinking of adding another 5-10ml of oil,supposedly this doesnt affect the initial travel of the fork,but i'm not sure thats right?I know it's hard without having the suspension re valved but I also wanted a little bit softer on initial stroke,and over small bumps. is this possible?

Thanks fellas

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The stock springs would have been fine for your weight. Sure the new ones will assist bottoming, but you are not addressing the real issue. The springs are intended to support the combined weight of yourself and your bike at a given ride height. The damping should then combine with the springs to ensure they compress and rebound at the correct velocities. Heavier springs will certainly add to the total force component within the forks to create a greater overall resistance but this comes at a cost. The heavier springs will alter the final geometry of the bike and demand greater control from the damping mechanism. Unfortunately the damping on the CRfs is insufficient in stock form. You will assist anti-bottoming by raising the oil level in the outer chamber. I believe stock recommends 387ml. This will in turn add to the total spring force. And the loveliness goes on. The oil volume affects the entire stroke yet is most evident nearing the latter region. Given that the oil in the outer chamber also controls the effectiveness of the bottom out cone, I would suggest you employ a 10wt for the job.

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a good magazine reccomends the 048 springs,on the CRF's,no matter what you weigh,they say it gives the bike greater feel,they also run 10ml less oil,i'm in the UK and think the standard oil level is 10ml less than the states.

so the stiffer springs were needed,how can they not if the bike is setup for lighter riders.

how will 10wt oil adjust the feel of the forks?will it be the same as adding 10ml of oil?

thanks for the help

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how will 10wt oil adjust the feel of the forks?

lame. i wouldn't recommend 10 oil

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lame. i wouldn't recommend 10 oil

Why not 7.5 to 10WT.

Terry is referring to the outer tubes not the cart.

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how will 10wt oil adjust the feel of the forks?

Like Terry said, "Given that the oil in the outer chamber also controls the effectiveness of the bottom out cone, I would suggest you employ a 10wt for the job."

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Hey,

thanks guys,this is what i'm saying,I dont want it to stiffen up the initial stroke also,I actualy want the initial softer if possible?

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The forks on your bike are prone to bottoming due to fact that they gather momentum too easily. The damping is too light, not the springs. The oversized piston in the latest Showas requires too many initial shims simply to control oil flow. This will create a firmer initial feel yet once the shims bend to allow oil flow a lot of your control is lost and the flood gates open. The fork then tends to fall through the stroke promoting bottoming. I'm afraid I cannot consider the adaptation of .48s for any weight rider credible advice at all. Then again as a suspension tuner, I would probably make a lousy magazine editor.

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Is tuck to what most people 'seem' to be doing with the Showa's and that is heavier springs,usualy 049's,and this does greatly improve the feel,and bottoming,but still not quite their.

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To absorb the energy of an impact the suspension needs to be able to match force with resistance. Your suspension deals with 3 forces

Spring force

Damping force

Frictional force

Obviously we wish to eliminate friction as much as possible so this leaves us with only 2 tunable forces. spring and damping.

Getting the correct ratio is the key. If you need to dissapate 100kg of force you may find that the ideal ratio is 50% spring-50% damping. Your stock fork is providing (example) 60% spring - 30% damping. You and most others are filling the void with additional spring force to create 70 / 30. While this creates enough resistance, overall you are not getting the ultimate ride from your bike.

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The reason it feels worse on hacky stuff is because you put stiffer springs in it. What Terry is STILL trying to tell you is you need to fix the valving NOT keep going stiffer on spring rate...and throw those damn mags away...

The springs support the bike and rider, period. The VALVING controls the rate at which the susp moves. Fix the valving and it will be plush and still not bottom harshly.

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