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Sliding Out On Turns

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HI I NEED SOME HELP ON TURNS. EVERY TIME I AM RACING ON THE TRACK OR TRAIL THERE IS ALWAYS ONE OR MORE LOSSE CORNERS. IF I AM GOING TO FAST MY FRONT TIRE SLIDS OUT, AND IF I SLOW DOWN I ALWAYS GET PASSED :thumbsup: . MY FRONT TIRE IS BRAND NEW, WHAT AM I DOING WRONG?

THANKS

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Well Have You Tried Weighing Down The Outside Peg And Scooting Up On Your Tank Going Into The Turn.

How About Hitting That Caps Lock Button Some Time Buddy?!

Edit: What the hell how did he make his all caps but mine gets auto formatted..??? :thumbsup:

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Suspension plays a big part in that too... Try not getting up on the tank too far, lose corners call for a little wait off the front end to prevent the tire from washing out, plus it gives your rear tire a little more bite.

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Suspension plays a big part in that too... Try not getting up on the tank too far, lose corners call for a little wait off the front end to prevent the tire from washing out, plus it gives your rear tire a little more bite.

I find that the looser the dirt, the farther up the tank I climb. For me, it gets that front tire planted and also allows the ass end to slide around faster thus giving the front tire less time to slide.

Just my .02

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I agree with what everyone else said, but may I also add...the tire may play a part in this too. Is you're tire the correct one for the terrain?

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I agree with what everyone else said, but may I also add...the tire may play a part in this too. Is you're tire the correct one for the terrain?

...and pressure.

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Tire presure is critical. Usually when the front washes out, if I'm quick enough, I countersteer or rev the crap out of it to compensate with sliding the rear wheel.

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I find that the looser the dirt, the farther up the tank I climb. For me, it gets that front tire planted and also allows the ass end to slide around faster thus giving the front tire less time to slide.

Just my .02

Yes, but that is not the correct way... If conditions in a corner are deep loam, sand, or mud, you do not want to put as much weight on the front end as you would if it is hard packed. If conditions are hard you want to get up on the tank and over the bars so that wheel will stick. If it is deep cond. dont slide back on the seat (should have made that point earlier,sry) just lean your body back a little as you start to get on the gas. I was always told do not lean forward in deep cond. because your wheel will want to push out, and believe me, it does. You want your front wheel to almost try and glide across the loam and sand and your back wheel to hook up, other wise you will be spinning, spinning, spinning and going no where. But, whatever works for you.

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Yes, but that is not the correct way... If conditions in a corner are deep loam, sand, or mud, you do not want to put as much weight on the front end as you would if it is hard packed. If conditions are hard you want to get up on the tank and over the bars so that wheel will stick. If it is deep cond. dont slide back on the seat (should have made that point earlier,sry) just lean your body back a little as you start to get on the gas. I was always told do not lean forward in deep cond. because your wheel will want to push out, and believe me, it does. You want your front wheel to almost try and glide across the loam and sand and your back wheel to hook up, other wise you will be spinning, spinning, spinning and going no where. But, whatever works for you.

I agree with you KTM. I think we all should have clarified what "loose" meant. I was referring to hard pack with loose gravel (like a fire road). It's a completely different approach to deep sand, etc (as you said). :thumbsup:

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Chances are you are not connecting the dexes. If there is a moment in time BETWEEN braking and accelerating in a corner it will cause your front tire to slip. Basically, when you come into a corner your rear tire is skidding/sliding. When you are accelerating it's doing the same thing. If you allow the rear tire to suddenly gain traction while braking, it puts a jolt on the front tire causing it to lose traction. The trick is to make the transition from braking to accelerating seemless. This will eliminate the jolt.

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like everyone is saying, tire pressure, suspension, clutch, body position, and make sure you have a good tire. also the dirt could be loose

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I agree with you KTM. I think we all should have clarified what "loose" meant. I was referring to hard pack with loose gravel (like a fire road). It's a completely different approach to deep sand, etc (as you said). :thumbsup:

Yeah, I was thinking the same thing. :ride:

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Try leaning the bike down but keep your body straight. Dont lean your body the same angle as the bike. RC does that alot if you watch in slow motion. Its like me moves the bike between his legs but keeps his body more verticle over the bike. Works pretty good.

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I'm going to elaborate on Ocho's post. In my experience the tires are only working if you are either on the gas or on the brakes. If you are coasting the tires are grabbing and digging into the dirt. Ever chopped the throttle after a high speed straight and just coasted before grabbing brakes? The bike wants to slide out from under you because the tires are just floating on the surface.

You need to either be on the gas or on the brakes and sometimes both at the same time.

As far as losing traction while exiting a turn. Tire pressure. I run between 10-12 psi normally. Body position. If you are too far back, when the rear tire breaks lose, you are going with it. Whereas if you are up on the front end, even if the tire breaks loose, it will continue driving forward as long as you are on the gas and holding the bike with your legs. You have to put your butt on the outside edge of the seat, push down and back with the outside leg while at the same time pushing against the bike with your outside knee. If you do all of this in one smooth fluid motion, as well as keep your outside elbow up, your corner speed will improve drastically. :thumbsup:

For deep loamy or sandy turns, you should stay in a neutral position so as to not bury the front end, but you still need to keep your butt on the outside edge of the seat and weight the peg. You don't have to weight as hard on the peg and you'll stick pretty good, but you also want to increase your lean angle.

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baron von you are right there becuase once i was goin down a steep hill and went to hit it into 2nd gear and breakin hardish and when i went to go down a gear i hit it into nautral and the bike just washed from under me thats becuase what you said the bike ent got no drive so the front just wanted toslide like you said. so are you tryin to say when comin into a corner try and keep the trottle on a tiny bit? :thumbsup:

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baron von you are right there becuase once i was goin down a steep hill and went to hit it into 2nd gear and breakin hardish and when i went to go down a gear i hit it into nautral and the bike just washed from under me thats becuase what you said the bike ent got no drive so the front just wanted toslide like you said. so are you tryin to say when comin into a corner try and keep the trottle on a tiny bit? :thumbsup:

You need to go from accelerating down the straight to braking instantly to accelerating instantly when exiting the turn. Sometimes it's good to keep the brakes on just slightly when exiting just to keep the tires hooked up, but that's a pretty advanced technique.

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so keep the breaks on a tiny bit goin round the corner aswell if so both breaks or just the one. thanx

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so keep the breaks on a tiny bit goin round the corner aswell if so both breaks or just the one. thanx

Honestly, I wouldn't worry about that right now. If the front end is washing, dragging the front brake very slightly can help keep it planted. Dragging the rear brake can help keep it planted if you have what I like to call, "ham-fisted throttle control". But it's pretty tough to do either one, especially the rar brake, so I suggest you really work on body positioning and throttle control.

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