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Factory Connection: What's worth it?

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I'm getting a re valve on both ends from factory connection and I wonder if there's any other product I should get from them while I'm at it. I'm riding sandy MX tracks in the beginner class on my CRF250R and I'm 125lbs.

I'm already getting the FC shock(yellow)/fork springs, High speed Comp. Adj. Spring, FC spring Guide Spacer set and FC Fork pressure spring.

Are the FC team work pre-load ring any good? How about their linkage? Is their titanium springs woth it? I'm having a lot of problem with a harsh fork and a skipping sideways rear end, anything could fix this?

Thank you. :thumbsup:

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You are buying a lot of things you don't need. At 125lbs you are way too light for the bike. Lighter springs and softer valving will make an enormous difference for you. Save your money on the rest and keep good tyres on the thing. There really is nothing wrong with the other parts on your suspension. The IC spring plays a pivotal role in ensuring damping consistancy within the cartridge. Using a lighter one would be similar to letting half the gas out of your shock reservoir. If you select the right main spring there should be no reason to touch the IC spring.

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I notice that Showa installs different IC springs for different bikes.

450r=2.1 ics

250r=1.9 ics

250cr=1.8 ics

Rm250=1.6/1.7 ics

Rm125=1.4/1.5 ics

Why is that ?

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What's the IC spring? :thumbsup:

Also, every accessories I listed was recommended by FC with the revalve. But I don't know, that's why I'm here. :ride:

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What's the IC spring? :ride:

Also, every accessories I listed was recommended by FC with the revalve. But I don't know, that's why I'm here. :cry:

Because they make more money that way and can use an "assembly line" type of building technique.

Listen to Terry. He is one of the few honest builders in the business! I have always wondered about the different IC springs myself? What rate is the best one?

The inner-chamber spring loads a floating piston in the cartridge that pressurizes the fluid similar to a shock. That is the main benefit to a twin-chamber fork. Less chance of cavitation. Don't dare ask what cavitation is...look it up! :ride:

:thumbsup:

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I notice that Showa installs different IC springs for different bikes.

450r=2.1 ics

250r=1.9 ics

250cr=1.8 ics

Rm250=1.6/1.7 ics

Rm125=1.4/1.5 ics

Why is that ?

Perhaps it is related to different valving stacks and the pressures they create. Just a thought.

You could always wander out to the cement pond and ask Elly May or Granny what they think .

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WRT those bikes I pointed out, showa hardly changed up much at all w/ the stock shimstack configuration.

They all have 15-16 30x.1 - LS

they all taper pretty consistently, 29x.1, 28x.1, ....20x.1 and on down to 18x.1 - HS

and they kept similar 20x.1, 17x.1 midvalve stack, give or take a few 20x.1

Bleed stack is similar, as well as rebound too.

The notable variance is the outer and IC springs. It looks like Showa did so to enable the fork to match a lighter bike vs heavier bike.

And I can appreciate Terry's analogy w/ releasing pressure out of a shock.

I wouldn't want my shock to be low on psi. But I don't think the IC spring produces such a high psi for I can easily compress the damper rod (when bleeding the IC chamber) with my bare hands.

I'm sure down the road I'll find the true meaning of it all :thumbsup::ride::cry:, but until more evidence presents itself, I cannot think of a compelling reason to lock into one rate IC spring for all bikes.

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The crf250x has a lighter ICS than the cr250r, even though it is 25 pounds heavier.

It also has lighter fork and shock springs.

There's two contradictions for ya!

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The crf250x has a lighter ICS than the cr250r, even though it is 25 pounds heavier.

It also has lighter fork and shock springs.

There's two contradictions for ya!

thats cause the x wasent built for mx tracks

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thats cause the x wasent built for mx tracks

I thought properly engineered susp used the springs to support the rider and bikes weight while the valving was tailored for type of riding, IE; MX or Woods? :thumbsup:

:ride:

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They all have 15-16 30x.1 - LS

they all taper pretty consistently, 29x.1, 28x.1, ....20x.1 and on down to 18x.1 - HS

and they kept similar 20x.1, 17x.1 midvalve stack, give or take a few 20x.1

Give or take a "few" 20x.1 shims with the mid-valve can make a "huge" difference....... :thumbsup:

doc

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The main purpose of the IC spring is to ensure that cartridge refill keeps pace with fork extension. Should the fork extend faster than the IC spring can do its job, cavitation will occur. Placing lighter IC springs within the fork will reduce overall spring force providing a plusher feel but it comes at the expense of damping control. We have all seen how slowly the IC spring extends the cartridge in stock form. Why would you make it slower?

The comp adj spring works over such a small fluid volume that its benefit is limited to extra income for Factory Connection only. If you wish to make your H/S circuit plusher run your L/S 2 clicks softer or simply back off the H/S half a turn. Combine this with "Oil Lock rings" and we have marketing reaching the rediculous stage.

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...Combine this with "Oil Lock rings" and we have marketing reaching the rediculous stage.

Terry, I found (the hard way) you were right all along about these. I have bought them, only to find that using thicker oil in the spring chamber offers the same improvement in bottoming protection, and with thicker oil it gives you some tuning options. Besides, these after-market oil-lock rings wear out on the edges because they are too large and contaminate the oil in no time. It's just as you say; marketing...

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Thank you all. The only thing I kept in the list is the FC main springs (fork, shock). I'm looking forward to see the result of the revalve. :cry: Since my weight is so radically under the average the suspension was maid for, I'm expecting a huge improvement. :thumbsup: Since I just started racing Beginner, it's hard to see if my difficulties on the track are the cause of wrong technique or bike setup. One thing is sure, It's rough out there on the sandy track. Those braking/accel. bumps are killing me. :ride:

I'll post my review once I have the chance and thank you again. :ride:

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KTM-LEW understood what I was talking about. It's common theory that under most circumstances, springs are only used to support the weight of the bike and rider, going from MX to woods is all about valving.

Yet here we have a bike that is 25 pounds heavier, using softer springs. That's pretty much flies in the face of what most tuners believe about suspension set up.

My opinion? There IS something to using softer springs for woods, heavier springs for MX.

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KTM-LEW understood what I was talking about. It's common theory that under most circumstances, springs are only used to support the weight of the bike and rider, going from MX to woods is all about valving.

Yet here we have a bike that is 25 pounds heavier, using softer springs. That's pretty much flies in the face of what most tuners believe about suspension set up.

My opinion? There IS something to using softer springs for woods, heavier springs for MX.

Just for clarification, are you referring to the main springs, IC springs or both?

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I also just sent my stuff to FC for revalving ( both ends), the guy on the wire said it's 179 for work-(each end), + fluid,+ shipping, + seals, + because the bike has 600+/- miles I should be doing bushings too. I'm waiting for the call where their gonna try to sell me IC springs, spring seats...ect...

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ttr225. Mostly the main springs. Conventions about ICS springs are not as well established.

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TTR

Have you spoken to anyone else about your work? To be honest, most fork bushings are very durable and will last well in excess of 600 miles. Due to their close tolerances the Showa bushings tend to peel the teflon during disassembly of the tubes. By using the hydraulic method to push the seals out no harm will come to the bushings what so ever. It takes a few minutes longer but you save your customer a fair bit of coin.

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