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Bad Swap Through Whoops...

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Just curious if there is a problem with my set-up on my '01 XR400. I went out to Pismo Dunes last week and decided to blast through some sand whoops. I pretty much got to 5th gear and had to shut her down because I got a bad swap. Do you guys know what suspension settings will help out in this situation? Right now the suspension is stock, but I have the GPR stabilizer installed. I am 100% sure it's not my technique through the whoops either.

BTW I'm about 210# with gear on, descent rider, on stock suspension w/GPR.

Thanks.

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The stock fork springs are too light for your weight. And the shock spring is on the verge of being too light, may be able to get away with using it tho. Put some .47kg fork springs in.

http://www.racetech.com/evalving/english/Srchpr.asp?bikeid=116&manufacture=Honda&model=XR400R&year=2001&TABLEINFO=dirt&langname=english

When you say swap, you mean the front end? OOOO I hate that.

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probably back... right? never heard of a front end swapping... unless ur talking headshake. When it starts (it will no matter what occasionally) let of just a bit and muscle it back to where it needs to be. I am 145ish when i get out of the shower and i can do it.... i'm on a 250... but still

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I am 210 with out gear and when the bike suspension was stock I never had the confidence to run it through a whoop section in 5th gear.

I sent my suspension to Race Tech and had them rework the forks and rear shock. In the front new springs, gold valves & new oil. In the rear gold valve, new oil and stock spring with 100 mm of sag and it is a completely new bike.

Now I have a Scotts Damper and the bike tracks straight through the whoops.

If you are on a budget I would recommend new fork springs, change the fork oil set the rear sag and try it again in 4th gear first time.

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The back end is what's swapping. It was actually pretty bad! I can just get springs and the stock valves and shims tuned by a good shop for a reasonable price, right?

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When I was looking I was getting prices from $600.00 to $675.00 for the front and rear.

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I get rear tire swapping and i think it is because the rebound setting is to responsive. Soften it up some, that is what i have been trying. Less rebound.

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Might try a couple more clicks of rebound dampening. If your weight is on the rear tire and it's swapping you don't have enough rebound dampening probably. I would try fiddling with the clickers, fork height, and race sag before deciding to rework the rear shock. I like forks all the way down, sag at 105ish, and the most rebound dampening I can have without it stacking over multiple whoops. XR4s are not good sand or whoop bikes but set up as above with the GPR and you should be as fast through that stuff as you want to be:) HTH

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That's for new valves too, right? I don't care to have new valves, I just want the stock stuff worked on with new springs.

Are you in SoCal? What shops did you look at, if you don't mind asking?

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I dont think Gold Valves are a necessity on this bike. If we were talking about an early 90's CR then most definitely, but the XR's suspension pistons dont have problems with choking the oil flow.

Shaun, there are a bunch of good shops around. Fineline in HB, ENZO Racing in Santa Ana (more of a KYB shop, but will work on Showa too), ESP in La Crescenta just to name a few. It seems a lot of the desert racers really like the work George @ ESP does.

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I'll try adding more compression and adjusting the sag...that's free! Will adding some rebound help with the stacking too? I also sent a quick e-mail to ESP to see what they can do.

Thanks for all of the help guys!

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That's for new valves too, right? I don't care to have new valves, I just want the stock stuff worked on with new springs.

Are you in SoCal? What shops did you look at, if you don't mind asking?

Yes I am in So Cal

Precision Concepts in Temecula http://www.precisionconceptsracing.com/Precision_content.html was one of my first choices and I was also talking to RG3 in Anaheim http://www.rg3suspension.com/ both of them were going to re-work the stock valves.

I ended up going with Race Tech because of a friend of a friend work there and he personally work on my stuff. It was still under $700 but if I have a problem / question I can call him any time.

If it is in the budget do it. You will not be sorry. :thumbsup:

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I know PC is the best, but I want affordable. I also believe that the extent of what I want done can be performed by any good shop for a reasonable price with the same quality.

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i'd definitely try heavier springs, front and rear. if your suspension isnt balanced fore and aft, it can cause swapping in the whoops.

i read somewhere around here that the stock shock spring is good for up to a 200# rider.

im 195#'s nekked, and i've got a 10.8 spring that i want to try. it might be a little stiff. maybe for some natural terrain moto.

ive got .48's up front. they made a world of difference in the handling. all stock valving.

ive heard good things about George at ESP, in Tujunga.

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OK.... I'm not too afraid to look foolish (and the fact that there is much that I do not know will come as no surprise to most of you).

What the hell is 'swapping' (other than an activity that happens between consenting adults)?

Meatbomb........

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Swapping is when the back of the bike jumps side to side uncontrolably. Have you ever seen the road racers get into what they call a "tank slapper"? Find a good road race crash video and you'll see what I mean!

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Swapping sucks... nuf said. But as Homey said, back end jumps back and forth... if left uncorrected it can keep getting worse till your on the ground in pain

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Try backing off on the steering damper. The beauty of the Scott’s is the adjustable slow speed circuit, slow speed all the way off, high speed all the way on. :thumbsup:

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Try backing off on the steering damper. The beauty of the Scott’s is the adjustable slow speed circuit, slow speed all the way off, high speed all the way on. :thumbsup:

I have the "beauty of GPR". I don't understand the logic of backing off of the steering damper :ride: I would think it would get worse!

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Give it a try. My bike never swapped until I put a steering damper on. The problem is that when the slow speed damping is set too high your natural ability to counter steer is slowed to the point that you can’t keep up with what’s going on out back. Next time you find a good set of whoops try it both ways.

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