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powered coating hubs

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usually the place doing the coating will sand blast and clean all the oils off the part before it receives powder coat. (you will have to pull out all the bearings, seals and center spacer though). depending on the color you get you may want to sand the texture off first. especially if it's a transparent candy color. sanding isn't neccesary but it will give you a smoother glass like finish. hope this helps! also, after re-lacing your wheels check the spokes quite often. as the thickness of the powder coat compresses your wheels will loosen up. better yet, see if they will mask off the area where the head of the spoke sits. (they usually have little rubber cone-shaped plugs for filling threaded holes and such and they should be able to use them on the spoke holes as well.) this will cut down on the spokes loosening but you should still check 'em like usual.

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do you hve to sand your hubs before powered coating cuz my hubs are rough

its for a crf 250

Are you going to try this yourself or are you sending it out to be coated? Like the dude from Calif said, the people that coat the parts will prep it before coating. Just like with any other painting, prepping the parts is the most important part. The powder will not stick unless it is completely clean. If the hub is really rough they will probably have to sand blast it and then glass bead it to smooth out the surface. The candy or translucent colors require a base coat so keep this in mind because each coat of powder is around 3 mils thick on average so the standard colors are best for hubs and rims because like he said you don't want to have to much buildup where the spokes holes are. It's hard to block off these holes because of the shape and size so it's best to just cover everything with a even coat and you should have no problems as the powder if applied correctly will be as strong as the original surface only 2 or 3 mils thicker.

If you do the rims also, hopefully the coater will know to use a longer cure time at a lower temp so you don't weaken the rim. There are also specialty powders that cure at lower temps but are expensive to buy. Normal standard colors will cure at or around 275 to 350 degrees just fine but will have to be baked longer to fully cure. 400 degrees for 25 minutes wont hurt the hubs but in some cases could weaken the rim. I have been experimenting with different cure times and temps to see what works best for rims but it's hard to find old parts that are out of service to use a sacrificial lambs.

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Powdercoated hubs look really weird. Anodized looks better IMHO.

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The candy or translucent colors require a base coat

I was told by our powder supplier that you only need to apply a base coat to a dull surface but that a shinny surface will not need a base coat. This is from the crazy Austrian owner from Tiger Drylac. We were trying to match a bronze top cap color and he came out to our shop to help us trouble shoot the issue apparently he was in town for some other things and came an helped.

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