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Torquing new spark plug...

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OK...now I'm fu**ing paranoid that I may have caused cyl head damage :thumbsup: to my bike after my lil' experience with torquing the fu**ing valve cover bolts with my Husky torque wrench. I put a new plug in after checking valve clearances and used the torque wrench to torque to 8 ft/lbs. The wrench is damn near new and I ALWAYS set it back to 0 after use. What are my chances of causing thread damage to the head after torquing the plug to 8 ft/lbs (sure felt like I turned awhile before it hit the "click")...FU** TORQUE WRENCHES!!!

Today I removed the previously new plug and replaced with a brand spankin' new CR8EK and hand cranked it down about 3/4 of a turn past finger tight...Think I'm OK? If I potentially sheared the threads while "torquing", is it possible that the shavings fell into the cylinder? There were NOT any shavings on the removed plug. Am I fu**ing paranoid? Oh yeah...FU** TORQUE WRENCHES!!!

P.S. Excuse my French BUT...I had to order (won't be in until this Thurs.) a 7mm Helicoil kit to fix my last problem so I haven't ridden in days....can you say with withdrawals? Where's my straight jacket??? :ride:

Jered

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Your bike will be fine. You, well I'm not so sure about :thumbsup:

For future plug installation don't use a tq wrench and 1/2 turn after snug is will do it.

Ken

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If there were no aluminum threads parts on the plug,, your fine. Next time remember it's a crush washer... designed to crush :thumbsup: Hand tight then about 1/2 ~ 3/4 turn.. If you feel it start to really tighten down,, STOP, your done.

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There is no "Husky" torque wrench that is accurate down to that amount, not that I'd trust at least.

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You can not blame a tool for improper use. Torque wrenches (even good ones) are accurate to a percentage of full scale. So say a 100 ft lb wrench is accurate to 2%. That is plus/minus 2 pounds. Not bad at 100 ft pounds. Not too bad at 50. Not so good at 20 ft lb. Now that +/- 2 lb is 10 %. Useless at 10 ft lbs. And this is for a good wrench. Clicker wrenches are even worse at low scale settings plus being speed sensitive.

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I've learned this the hard way....I've been "playing" with wrenches and moto-scooters for a while now and I've never managed anything like this. I split the cases and rebuilt my CR80 when I was 14...guess you never stop learning... :thumbsup:

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Don't give up the torque wrenches, they do serve a purpose. In your thread about the stripped valve cover bolts I listed some of the things that I never use a torque wrench on......add spark plugs to that list. :thumbsup:

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Don't give up the torque wrenches, they do serve a purpose. In your thread about the stripped valve cover bolts I listed some of the things that I never use a torque wrench on......add spark plugs to that list. :thumbsup:

I DO realize the importance of a torque wrench (i.e. hubs) to ensure that you've gotten it at least "tight enough". But I'll NEVER again use the one I have for minute torque requirements...unless of course I buy something similar to the snap-on 1/4" model...but $200 is halfway toward a Yosh RS3. :ride:

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For very high temp applications like spark plugs, I use a *little* anti-seize compound (usually contains lead), oil is useless for very long at cylinder head temperatures.

Bob

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