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I recently bought a tt-r250. In the manuel it says to use either a 10w-30 or 20w-40 oil, but says nothing about whether two use synthetic oil or what. I have to questions I'd like to ask:

1. Would a 10w-40 be ok?

2. Synthetic oil or otherwise, what would you guys suggest I use?

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Make sure you search the forums first. This topic has been exhausted and there are a ton of different opinions. Go to the YZ400/426/450 forum and do a search for oil and you will have 30 days of reading. A lot of guys there have paid for professional oil analysis, give em a look.

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Rotella. 100% synthetic and one of the best oils you can buy. Walmart for $15.00/gallon

I know you guys put this oils on your bikes but, i know the best option would be the rotella synthetic but with the other dino oils like rotella t or delvac 1300, or delo 400 are pretty much the same, but, when it comes to semi synthetic, the ester based oils are the better alternative, i researched a lot and found that's the best option, i don't know with the rotela T but with Motul 5100 ESTER, the engine stays cleaner, that's why i didn't want to give a try to the Dyno oils.

I choose Motul 5100 instead dyno oils. Down here ( Chile), oils are pretty much expensive. The Mobil 1 delvac 5w-40 gallon price is US $60 or 70 :applause: ,there are the other options like delvac 1300 or delo 400 and their prices are around 20 bux the gallon :applause: .

The quart of Motul 5100 is around 10 US dollar, i bought 2 quarts for my 250 TTR, i know you guys go for pretty much off road but me, i'm more on the dual sport side, my TTR has kickstart :ride: , i'm thinking changing the oil every 2000 miles or so, what do you think? :thumbsup:

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I know you guys put this oils on your bikes but, i know the best option would be the rotella synthetic but with the other dino oils like rotella t or delvac 1300, or delo 400 are pretty much the same, but, when it comes to semi synthetic, the ester based oils are the better alternative, i researched a lot and found that's the best option, i don't know with the rotela T but with Motul 5100 ESTER, the engine stays cleaner, that's why i didn't want to give a try to the Dyno oils.

The Rotella 15w-40 keeps everything nice and clean!! Don't worry

I choose Motul 5100 instead dyno oils. Down here ( Chile)' date=' oils are pretty much expensive. The Mobil 1 delvac 5w-40 gallon price is US $60 or 70 :applause: ,there are the other options like delvac 1300 or delo 400 and their prices are around 20 bux the gallon :applause: .[/quote']

Damn, we got it good then

The quart of Motul 5100 is around 10 US dollar' date=' i bought 2 quarts for my 250 TTR, i know you guys go for pretty much off road but me, i'm more on the dual sport side, my TTR has kickstart :ride: , i'm thinking changing the oil every 2000 miles or so, what do you think? :thumbsup:[/quote']

Because TT-R's are air cooled, the oil temperature runs alot hotter than a liquid cooled bike. IMO 2000 miles is way too long to go between oil changes on that bike. Why you ask, because the oil capacity is only like 1.3 lt and motor that carries that little oil will break it down way fast. If you're running on strickly paved roads (asphalt/concrete) then 1000 miles would be the MAXIMUM you should go on oil. If its a 50/50 mix of dirt and asphalt then 500 miles should be the most to go on the oil. I've run oil in my TT-R for 400 miles (dirt only) and truthfully it looked like crap. Remember that oil is cheap compared to an engine rebuild.

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I recently bought a tt-r250. In the manuel it says to use either a 10w-30 or 20w-40 oil, but says nothing about whether two use synthetic oil or what. I have to questions I'd like to ask:

1. Would a 10w-40 be ok?

2. Synthetic oil or otherwise, what would you guys suggest I use?

In my opinion, the it is more important to use the right weight oil for the riding conditions and change the oil frequently than whether it is synthetic or not. Even using $5 quart oil, you are not spending much if you change your oil after every ride or two. Its a case of pay me now or pay me later. Just check the forum for the guys who changed the oil in their dirt bikes on the same interval as their cars. They are rebuilding motors.

You have really got to be careful when changing viscosities. Just because the oil says 40 as the last numbers does not mean that a 10W-40 has the same characteristics as a 20W-40. I would be more prone to substitute a 15W-40 or 20W-50 for summer riding than a 10W-40 for a 20W-40 oil.

Oils meeting the Society of Automotive Engineer's (SAE's) low temperature requirements (0 deg F) have a "W" after the viscosity rating (example: 20W), and oils that meet the high ratings (210 deg F) have no letter (example SAE 30). The weights given on oils are arbitrary numbers assigned by the SAE. Oils that fall into a certain range are designated 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 by the SAE. The W means the oil meets specifications for viscosity at 0 F and is therefore suitable for Winter use.

Multi-viscosity oils like the 20W-40 meet SAE specifications for the low temperature requirements of a light oil and the high temperature requirements of a heavy oil. Another way of looking at multi-vis oils is to think of a 20W-40 as a 20 weight oil that will not thin more than a 40 weight would when hot.

A good rule of thumb is to always use a multi grade with the narrowest span of viscosity that is appropriate for the temperatures you are going to encounter. In the winter base your decision on the lowest temperature you will encounter, in the summer, the highest temperature you expect. The wide viscosity range oils, in general, are more prone to viscosity and thermal breakdown due to the high polymer content required to obtain the spread. Additionally for the same span, the oil with the higher -XX will be less prone to breakdown. A 20W-50 has the same 30 point spread as a 10W-40, but because it starts with a heavier base it requires less viscosity index improvers (polymers) to do the job.

The recommended oil charts provided for each engine determine the range the oils should be used. For example, I have a viscosity chart for a water-cooled engine that shows that all SAE 10W-XX oils are good down to -20 deg F and all 20W-XX oils are good down to 15 deg F for this application. As each -XX increases, the maximum OAT increases. For example, the 10W-30 has an OAT range from -20 to 40 deg F, the 10W-40 has a range from -20 to 50 deg F, and the 10W-50 has a range from -20 to 70 deg F for this engine application. For comparison, the 15W-40 has a range from -5 to 90 deg F, and the 20W-50 has a range from 15 to 125 deg F on the same chart.

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The main deal is to use a Motorcycle Specific oil with a JASO MA rating so you know it is approved for Wet Clutch / Motorcycle use. I prefer Synthetic but you are OK if it has the JASO MA rating.

IMHO,

Dwight

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thanks for that guys, i didn't know the rotella T 15w-40 keeps the engine cleaner, because of its ash contents( i read this in other threads) protect the engine pretty much but due to ash contents, it builds up deposits in the compression chamber and the spark, that was the fact i didn't want to give a try to Rotella T or delvac 1300. But it would be really good to save some money and go to Mcdonalds :ride: like you guys say overthere

Cheers :thumbsup:

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thanks for that guys, i didn't know the rotella T 15w-40 keeps the engine cleaner, because of its ash contents( i read this in other threads) protect the engine pretty much but due to ash contents, it builds up deposits in the compression chamber and the spark, that was the fact i didn't want to give a try to Rotella T or delvac 1300. But it would be really good to save some money and go to Mcdonalds :ride: like you guys say overthere

Cheers :thumbsup:

The ash content limit for a JASO MA oil is 1.2%, the ash content of Rotella is 1.47%. The ash concern is really an non issue im motorcycle engines

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The ash content limit for a JASO MA oil is 1.2%, the ash content of Rotella is 1.47%. The ash concern is really an non issue im motorcycle engines

Thsnks again JSanfilippo,i see you know well the oils but, do you think a dino oil as rotella T can stand the same conditions of heat just like motul with the Ester in it?

Thanks

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Thsnks again JSanfilippo,i see you know well the oils but, do you think a dino oil as rotella T can stand the same conditions of heat just like motul with the Ester in it?

Thanks

I don't know that Rotella would last as long as an ester based synthetic. Nothing short of a used oil analyisis (UOA) would answer that. Search bobistheoilguy.com

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Thsnks again JSanfilippo,i see you know well the oils but, do you think a dino oil as rotella T can stand the same conditions of heat just like motul with the Ester in it?

Thanks

Absolutely not. Esters can take much more heat. Rotella has been a decent alternative oil but with the reformulation going on with it , I don't know if it will be wet clutch safe. I prefer synthetic oils ( ester based ) with a JASO MA rating.

Dwight

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Thsnks again JSanfilippo,i see you know well the oils but, do you think a dino oil as rotella T can stand the same conditions of heat just like motul with the Ester in it?

Thanks

Rotella T was originally formulated to lubricate high HP (600) turbocharged diesel engines. These turbo bearings are lubed by crankcase oil, and the turbo's regularly reach and exceed 800F degrees, and the torque applied to the main and rod bearings far exceeds the abuse a TTR can apply.

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Absolutely not. Esters can take much more heat. Rotella has been a decent alternative oil but with the reformulation going on with it , I don't know if it will be wet clutch safe. I prefer synthetic oils ( ester based ) with a JASO MA rating.

Dwight

The reformulation (CJ-4) was done as of July, but CI-4+ will be available until at least 2010. Just check the jug for the certification label. The reformulation consists of higher resistance to heat breakdown due to increased temps presented by EGR's and twin turbos, contains less zinc, and better soot control.

http://www.rotella.com/press/article_66.html

This should answer any further questions.

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The reformulation (CJ-4) was done as of July, but CI-4+ will be available until at least 2010. Just check the jug for the certification label. The reformulation consists of higher resistance to heat breakdown due to increased temps presented by EGR's and twin turbos, contains less zinc, and better soot control.

http://www.rotella.com/press/article_66.html

This should answer any further questions.

Less zinc is not good. CI-4+ was questionable in my opinion. Best thing is to just get a motorcycle rated JASO MA oil. I prefer synthetic because it holds up better under stress and heat. There are plenty of oils that meet JASO MA, even the cheaper petroleum oils will serve if changed frequently and not pushed hard like in racing.

IMHO,

Dwight

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The reformulation (CJ-4) was done as of July, but CI-4+ will be available until at least 2010. Just check the jug for the certification label. The reformulation consists of higher resistance to heat breakdown due to increased temps presented by EGR's and twin turbos, contains less zinc, and better soot control.

http://www.rotella.com/press/article_66.html

This should answer any further questions.

The CJ-4 will be sold in gallon and quarts as of october. Since the CI-4+ will be sold for roughly 3 more years, that gives me plenty of time to stock up.

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