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86 DR600 Dakar

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I'm looking at adding to my collection, I've come across an 86 Suzuki DR600 Dakar model that's in really good condition for its age. Are there any issues with this model that I should be aware of? I've never heard of this bike before, so some input would be greatly appreciated :thumbsup:

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Those older DR engines have a crappy counterbalancer system. They arn't real smooth down in the lower RPMs. They are just a little rougher then the new engines.

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That's kind of a cool looking bike. Wonder why I don't remember this?

Here's the specs: DR 600 R Dakar 1986

Overall Length: 2 215 mm (87.2 in)

Overall Width: 875 mm (34.4 in)

Overall Height: 1 235 mm (48.6 in)

Wheelbase: 1 465 mm (57.7 in)

Dry weight: 141 kg (310 lbs)

Engine type: Air/oil-cooled 589 cc SOHC 1-cylinder, 4 valves. 44 hp/ 6,500 rpm, 5,04 kg-m/ 5,000 rpm.

This info is from a great web site that has photos, ads, and specs of every Suzuki made. Lots of good stuff here.

http://www.suzukicycles.org/All-Suzuki/all_suzuki_models.html

If you are only interested in DRs: http://www.suzukicycles.org/DR-series/DR650.shtml

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I own a 89 DR600 Dakar

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they are a damn good bike but you may have some issues first of all.

the valves will more then likely need some attention (mine needed help) but then again you may be lucky.

If it is like mine it uses a 2 stroke carb so it has a air screw at the side not a fuel screw at the bottom

Starting issues!!! when you buy the bike if it is warm it will start first kick don't be fooled, if it is cold get your leg ready if you lucky it will start easy then again by the time i fixed it i was taking 10mins to start mine.

The way to fix it is cheep and easy so I'll tell you in case you need it,

first start the bike from dead cold get of let it idle check the exhaust system for leaks if you find 1 fix it then the remove the plug caps from the leads and get a flat blade screw driver dismantle the caps and clean them out especially the springs then put them back together, grab your leads and a pair of wire cutters cut the leads about 1/2 inch from the end put it all together and it should be fine.

Now after the fix from cold after not being started for 4days it took me 5 kicks.

these are the main issues i can think off but if you have any or need any info i have everything except the work shop manual and am more than willing to help.

beery

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I have a 1987 DR600. It is standing in the garage gathering dust at the moment due to broken clutch cable and leaky front brake hydraulic reservoir... one day soon I will get around to giving it the TLC that it deserves.

My DRZ 400 and BMW 1150 GS Adventure is getting all my attention at the moment, but at one stage the DR 600 was my sole means of transport.

It’s an awesome bike with loads of grunt. The kick starting went well if you follow the procedures exactly.

• With mine you have to slowly push the kickstarter to the lowest position. If it stopped against compression before it reached the bottom position, then bring your foot up a bit and then push the kickstarter again slowly down, until it is right at the bottom.

• Now the de-compression lever is pushed in and it then stays in this pushed in position by itself.

• Now you lift your foot all the way up and with your eyes on the de-compression lever, very gently push the kickstart down again until the de-compression lever clicks out. It is critical to stop pushing the kickstarter at almost precisely the same time as when the de-compression lever clicks out, otherwise it is best to re-start from step one.

• Now lift your foot again to as high as possible and gather your strength.

• Now give the kickstarter a heavy shove with your foot with as much force as you can muster and hay presto it starts first or at worst second time. Remember to follow through to the bottom with your kick.

Deviate a slight bit from this and you will be kicking for a while and yes she will kick back at you with a lot more force then you can ever imagine. Also don’t open the throttle while you kickstart… this is a sure way to flood it quick-quick. Rather hold the handle bar next to the throttle as this will ensure that you don’t sub-consciously give it a twist as you do your power kick.

The motor is bullet proof, but the electrics have let me down a few times. The CDI and voltage regulator are costly to replace, but the biggest headache with the electrics is that it seams blow bulbs all the time. When I was riding it on a daily basis I was replacing a bulb somewhere on the bike every second week. When the CDI gave me trouble a few years ago, the engine was retarding and advancing at the wrong time, thus make kickstarting a Russian roulette and caused the bike to backfire if run downhill against the engine compression so much so that the numberplate fell off because the plastic cleats holding it on melted off.

The Germans love this bike to bits and every one of my German colleagues that has visited me here in South Africa couldn’t stop talking about it when they heard I had a DR 600. There is even a German website dedicated to this bike (www.dr600.de).

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Thanks for the replys everyone :thumbsup: I just got back into town. I'm starting to warm up to this bike :ride:

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Thats exactly what i paid for mine once you convert :thumbsup: Dollars into :ride: Dollars.

GET IT!! you wont regret it.

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Hey Malachi, I'm in BC also and have a DR600 Dakar, daily driver. It's not a tall woman named Connie trying to sell you the bike, is it? That'd be my wife, j/k. This summer went through starting hell because my stator was failing. It's repaired now and hopefully no more problems. $1500 for this bike is a good deal if it's in good repair and not too highkms. Not a good bike for short riders. Other than the stator failing and it's related starting issues I have loved this bike. Always a little hard to start when it's hot, but you get used to it. Are you in or near Penticton? I've seen a 600 like mine on the street here, first one ever.

Dave

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Hi guys

I came across this page and Im hoping someone can help.

I have a suzuki DR 600, 90-91 as far as we know. About 4 weeks ago I rebuilt the bike. It was running fine and starting really easily. After the rebuilt now there is no spark. Any ideas about that the problem could be?

The bike has given me so many problems that was sorted out one by one, this is hopefully now the last of the problems, please help.

Thanks in advance

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Hi guys

I came across this page and Im hoping someone can help.

I have a suzuki DR 600, 90-91 as far as we know. About 4 weeks ago I rebuilt the bike. It was running fine and starting really easily. After the rebuilt now there is no spark. Any ideas about that the problem could be?

The bike has given me so many problems that was sorted out one by one, this is hopefully now the last of the problems, please help.

Thanks in advance

Take the stator off of the cover and check the wires at the back. Mine had burnt out, and I got 3 second hand stators until I found one that was repairable so it must be pretty common. You need to actually take the stator off, but you can measure the output statically by kicking it over with a multimeter, the readings are in the workshop manual.

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Hi, thanks for the reply. I got her fixed and now shes running perfectly again. Im still not sure exactly what the problem was. It might have been a faulty kick-stand switch:banghead:

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