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Harescramble for a beginner

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Hey I am interested in trying a hare scramble. I was wundering if anyone knows of a local race soon that is good for begginners. thanks

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Hey I am interested in trying a hare scramble. I was wundering if anyone knows of a local race soon that is good for begginners. thanks

www.megacross.com

Scroll down to FVOR go from there. The district 17 site can be located on this site also, which has the whole H/S schedule on it.

One of the Races at FVOR would be a good start.

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FVOR does have some hills, I haven't ran one in a few years but the early ones had some pretty technical climbs, for a beginner anyway.

Southfork is flat and pretty easy from what I've heard. Not sure what their schedule is though.

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i dont know har far you are but this weekend there is a D15 race at saddleback east. i just move here from maryland so this is my second race in indiana. GOOD LUCK!! :thumbsup:

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LTM in Casey, IL puts on some easy harescrambles. I rode there yesterday, there is nothing hard at all at Casey, its very easy. Check there website. click here

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Saddleback East is NOT for beginners!!!

I have no clue ive never been there. what makes it so tough?? is it really rocky or what?? :thumbsup:

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I have no clue ive never been there. what makes it so tough?? is it really rocky or what?? :thumbsup:

The layouts I've ridden have been very technical. More like a difficult enduro than a H/S. Long, steep off-camber up & downhills, sharp rocks, ledges, and poorly cut tight single-track.

I wasn't impressed. Mass-attrition shouldn't be part of a H/S in my book. To me, a beginner could be seriously hurt there.

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The annual Variety Riders event in Ottawa at Trumbo's farm is one of the best harescrambles in the state.

Trumbo's farm was sold, Variety riders event this year will be at Buffalo Range, in Ottawa, Il.

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Trumbos farm sold? I was talking to one of the Variety Riders club members last week at FVOR and he said they were adding minis this year and cutting the big bikes down to 1 1/2 hours. Didn`t say anything about changing locations? This was the funnest event I`ve ever raced and hope it will continue at the farm. Oh and isn`t the whole idea of a hare scramble supposed to be challenging and somewhat a test of ability and endurance?

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Oh and isn`t the whole idea of a hare scramble supposed to be challenging and somewhat a test of ability and endurance?

You'll get varying answers on this so I'll just give you my opinion. You can make fun of me later...

The only thing that should limit one's ability to finish a H/S is endurance. I can live with challenging someone to a certain degree, but true technical riding belongs in timed events (enduros) not speed events like H/S.

The line between the two types of events has narrowed over the years and is virtually invisible now - which is sad. That's one of the reasons I rarely ride 'modern' H/S events anymore - they've become 'survival' events. That's not what a true scrambles is supposed to be. :thumbsup:

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Trumbos farm sold? I was talking to one of the Variety Riders club members last week at FVOR and he said they were adding minis this year and cutting the big bikes down to 1 1/2 hours. Didn`t say anything about changing locations? This was the funnest event I`ve ever raced and hope it will continue at the farm. Oh and isn`t the whole idea of a hare scramble supposed to be challenging and somewhat a test of ability and endurance?

The last word I got was that the Variety riders race was at BR this year.

Spizz wasn't last sunday challenging enough, :thumbsup::ride::applause:

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You'll get varying answers on this so I'll just give you my opinion. You can make fun of me later...

The only thing that should limit one's ability to finish a H/S is endurance. I can live with challenging someone to a certain degree, but true technical riding belongs in timed events (enduros) not speed events like H/S.

The line between the two types of events has narrowed over the years and is virtually invisible now - which is sad. That's one of the reasons I rarely ride 'modern' H/S events anymore - they've become 'survival' events. That's not what a true scrambles is supposed to be. :ride:

I'm in whats the difference...Not a smart azz just explain.plz :thumbsup:

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I'm in whats the difference...Not a smart azz just explain.plz :thumbsup:

A H/S is a race - a speed event on a closed loop of varying length & terrain type. It should contain various elements to challenge & enhance the rider and his machine at speed. When you race a H/S - you are racing other entrants.

An enduro is technically not a race - but an event that should challenge the rider's ability to traverse terrain (usually very technical) within a specific time frame. When you compete in an enduro - your competition is yourself and the clock, not the other riders.

Lately the terrain types have become one between the two types of events. And now with the National Enduro Series dropping the time-keeping element for 2007, there's virtually no difference anymore. :ride:

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A H/S is a race - a speed event on a closed loop of varying length & terrain type. It should contain various elements to challenge & enhance the rider and his machine at speed. When you race a H/S - you are racing other entrants.

An enduro is technically not a race - but an event that should challenge the rider's ability to traverse terrain (usually very technical) within a specific time frame. When you compete in an enduro - your competition is yourself and the clock, not the other riders.

Lately the terrain types have become one between the two types of events. And now with the National Enduro Series dropping the time-keeping element for 2007, there's virtually no difference anymore. :thumbsup:

I'll show my age and backup Bultaco on this one. Most of the younger guys don't know the history of the sport so they don't understand the origins like us OLD guys. I think that may be why we understand the nuances of the different races a little better.

Harescrambles are the original motocross races. Back in the 50's, 60's, and even early 70's we didn't have motocross tracks. The races were in effect harescrambles. Motocross grew from harescramble races to give spectators a better view of the action. A harescramble should be similar to a motocross race, only on a longer track, and a longer race. But still a race against other bikes and should be about endurance.

The Enduro's were originally more a test of man and machine against a clock over varying degree's of terrain.

I agree with Bultaco that the two have more or less merged over the years. They should be two totally different events. A true harescramble would be similar to a Gran Prix race some tracks do now. Endurance just as important as speed.

Growing up I loved to run the harescrambles in addition to MX races. They were a great way to keep your conditioning up. Most of them were at MX tracks with a path in and out of the woods, but most of the track was the motocross course. The best ones were held at places that had 2 or more MX tracks with some woods thrown in. I rarely race one of these modern day harescrambles anymore because the terrain has been a bigger deal than the endurance part of it. I'm not a woods guy, so I don't care for what it has evolved in to.

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