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hairline crack on gas tank repair?

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bought a used ttr 125 for my son a few weeks ago to learn on it runs great perfect to learn on but it has a hairline crack on the tank is their any way to repair this a new tank is 250 dollars hope someone has a repair tip for this.

thanks art

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You can try bondo to fill the crack. Sand and paint accordingly to get everything looking smooth again.

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I would suggest putting some like model glue or epoxy i think it is on it. I cant remember which but I know it comes in a red tube and can be found next to all the model cars at walmart. it actually fuses the plastic together and has held very well on my bike.

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i'm not saying this will work but would a hot glue gun work. if it would melt it and then sand off the excess?? just a thought

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Don't use bondo!

Go to your local shop, there is a product out there thats just for fixing a cracked plastic tank. Usually the shop have it and will fix it for you for about $10, or you can buy a kit for about $20 and fix a lot of your freinds cracks before it goes bad (6 months). Also works good on your fender flares on your truck, mudflaps and I've been told, on water beds too. Do a google search, can't remember what its called...

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tank on ebay has expired i will go and try the red tube of glue at walmart. drthumper i went to the yamaha dealer they told me the tank had to be replaced could not be fixed maybe i will try a small bike repair shop . the previous owner soldered a piece of milk carton over the crack it looks bad thanks

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Do not use silicone or glue because little peices break get into you gas tank an eventually into your carb. I took a dirtbike apart before where they had used glue on some parts of the motor. You could see all of the glue in the carb and it wasn't pretty. An idea would maybe to take it to a plastic welder, and have him repair it.

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went down to autozone and got a kit that is made to repair plastic gas tanks put it on let it dry and sanded it down with a dremel it looks much better and has not leaked yet lets see how long it lasts

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i owned a ttr90 and a ttr125l both of my tanks cracked just by sitting in my HOT garage in Texas. Thats Bullshit

Called Yamaha out of California they claim they have had no problems with cracking tanks.

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I've used JBweld on my wife's KLX tank - it's reported to be impervious to gasoline. I love that stuff, always keep some in my trail bag. Good luck

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I tried jb weld it didn't work, it just peeled off. went to auto zone this morning and bought a plastic repair kit for water and gas tanks. i applied it and it seem to be sticking to it very well . i'll get back in a couple of days to see how its holding.

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Sorry to bump an old topic, but I thought I'd add to it just in case anyone else is having this problem. I bought a Urethane Supply Company Plastic Welding Kit from Rocky Mountain ATV to repair my son's tank.

It was very easy to use. I just cleaned the tank real well, drilled a hole in each end of the cracks to stop further "running," and used a Dremel to make a deep groove for the new weld. I filled in the groove and then sanded it all down and refinished the tank with PC Racing's Plastic Renew.

I patched 2 cracks, one about 3 inches long and another about 8 inches. I've since ran about four tanks of gas through it with no problems. It cost me $30 to repair vs. $250 to replace. The kit includes clear plastic rods which blend pretty good with the existing plastic, as well as colored rods for Yamaha, Honda, Suzuki, Kawasaki, and KTM.

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