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looking for that stationary bicycle setup

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In the pits at some races, I've seen guys (professional racers) riding bicycles mounted to some kind of stationary gizmo. Who makes a good one, what are nice features, and where do you get'em?

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You're probably referring to a resistance trainer, not just non-resistance rollers. Plus, you have to learn to balance on rollers -- not easy at first.

http://www.performancebike.com/shop/sub_cat.cfm?subcategory_id=4120

There are basically two choices in basic resistance trainers (not including display whizzy stuff) -- electromagnetic resistance and fluid assisted resistance. The fluid resistance is a little more expensive, but worth it IMO. I bought a basic EM resistance trainer about a year ago, and it is not as smooth as real biking or the full stationary bikes. The fluid assisted trainers are supposed to be a lot more even through your strokes. I'd also recommend putting a bike with clip-ons or with the U-holder things on your bike on the stand, so you can pull/push while you use it. That also helps to even out your strokes.

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I thought that might be what hes reffering to after I posted. Personally I like the idea of rollers more. You get a great cardio workout because its a constant pedal motion that allows you to spin as fast as you want.

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Cycling is my main hobby and I have an EM trainer that I've put in alot of hours on. Rollers are great, but they are difficult to learn and then you have to pay attention. When I'm just looking for a workout, I'd rather mount my bike up and just watch tv without having to worry about falling over the whole time. If your getting this just to warm up before a race or riding, just get a cheap magnetic trainer.

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Great info! I didn't have a clue about either type. I just couldn't see to giving up space in my home for a stationary only bike. I like the idea of being able to workout indoors as well as hit'n the road.

Berkeman, can you describe your workout, and do you use a fan for wind effect?

YzBrad is the roller kind a like a "spin" workout? Sounds good for sprints

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From what my co-worker (very accomplished cyclist) tells me, the rollers are like a spin workout. There is pretty much no resistance, so you can pedal up into high gear and keep a constant, spinning pedal motion. Because this is a constant speed and you should be spinning pretty fast, this is an awesome cardio workout. I guess 20 minutes on these gives you about the same amount of exercise as riding your bicycle on the road for an hour and a half.

Like they said though, the downside is you have to learn to ride all over again on these rollers and you have to pay attention to your riding while you are on it.

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I used to use a set of roller's. Once you get used to them- you don't even have to think. Different than stated, I guess I just had no problems, one handed, whatever. You do have to pay attention, but nothing more than riding down the road or the same for doing anything else. Learning curve for me and I wanted to use em wasn't more than 4,5,6 times on 'em. By 10, I didn't even have to think.

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Berkeman, can you describe your workout, and do you use a fan for wind effect?

When I'm on the stationary bike in the Gym at work, I don't use a fan generally because the air conditioning keeps the Gym fairly cool. When I'm spinning on the trainer at home out in the workshop, yeah, I usually have a fan pointed at me.

As for workouts, I usually swim a couple times a week (a little over a mile a day, with some IMs thrown in for fun), run 5 miles a couple times a week, and bike a couple times a week. If it's a stationary bike, I'll go for about 30 minutes. On my weekend morning mountain bike rides, they're about an hour to an hour and a half, with some pretty good climbs in them.

I never rode a stationary bike much until a couple years ago when I was recovering from some injuries. I pretty much couldn't do any running or swimming, and stationary bike was basically it. I was really impressed by how well the bike maintained my cardio fitness, and kept my legs in good enough shape so that when I started running again, I hadn't lost much in the way of speed or endurance. Plus, adding an extra day or two per week of stationary bike really helps you a lot in your real bike riding outside. No way I could climb the antenna farm hill at Coyote Hills (here in the East Bay in NorCal) on my MTB without the extra hours on a stationary bike. :thumbsup:

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