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Riding tech help needed:standing vs sitting

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:thumbsup: Well,when the terrain gets rocky or slippery, I understand if you dont have solid fundamentals, that a rider will start floundering/paddling/bouncing/sliding/ect..

I have found this to be sort of true with me, I tend to get through everything at as fast a pace as my buds, but its not pretty. Are there any hints anyone can give?

For example, I thought that when you stand, you should hug the seat with your knees and help take control of the bike with legs, BUT, I was just also reading that you should not hug the bike, but keep your legs apart to help kep the bike more agile. I tend to sit down most of the time in te tough stuff so when I do get out of form, I'm not falling over.

Help??

Any Links?

Any Pics

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I can't help much because I'm like you, not pretty but I get it done. For any of the technical rocky stuff we did in the hancock D/S I was standing, though. I let the bike sort of float beneath me in that stuff. Throttle and clutch control are also important.

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i'm the worlds worst at hugging the bike with my legs i usually try and old the bike steady with my feet on the pegs so i still wobble around a bit but it seems to work for me. wait for Dwight to give adivice he'll know what to do.

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Go faster so your dusting the tops of the rocks. Seriously. And stand. I don't grip the bike tightly in those sections. Stand as often as you can. You'll always handle unexpected things better if your standing and I don't think you know when unexpected things are going to happen.

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Hay trigger03,

Like arod2000 said, keep your speed up a little more - the bike is easier to balance when it carries more momentum. Having said that, with practice you will feel comfortable at any speed. I had the same problem as you, but I forced myself to stand 99% of the time just to adjust to it. When your on a straight piece of road, uphill, downhill, sand, rocks, everywhere, force yourself to stand so that you can adjust to the feeling of the bike. While your doing this, force yourself to cover your clutch and brake also. It all feels unnatural to begin with but if you discipline yourself it will become second nature to you. Now I feel uncomfortable sitting!

Furthermore, by practicing slow going snotty trails standing you'll get used to the bike squirming underneath you. Riding slow through sand standing is even better. After a while you won't even notice it. Having said this, you won't need to grip the bike too hard. The only time I grip the bike hard standing is when I'm under acceleration or braking.

Keep at it mate!

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Stand, stand, stand. You have the most control over the bike, believe it or not, when you are standing.

Of course, there are times to sit down.

If you are going through the tough stuff, stand as much as you can, keep your revs up and use the clutch. Bikes tend to want stand up straight when the revs are up.

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I'm no pro, but one of the tricks I picked up is peg weighting. It feels like I have more control of the pressure put on the outside peg in a corner when standing. This means more control in less than ideal conditions.

With some body english, you can slide the rear tire sideways through really tight corners. I'm not sure if this is good technique, but it is really fun and lets you turn sharp.

You can also get your body further over the bike in tight corners standing. For dexterity, trails riders are shocking and they never sit.

You also don't get monkey butt.

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Hay trigger03,

Like arod2000 said, keep your speed up a little more - the bike is easier to balance when it carries more momentum. Having said that, with practice you will feel comfortable at any speed. I had the same problem as you, but I forced myself to stand 99% of the time just to adjust to it. When your on a straight piece of road, uphill, downhill, sand, rocks, everywhere, force yourself to stand so that you can adjust to the feeling of the bike. While your doing this, force yourself to cover your clutch and brake also. It all feels unnatural to begin with but if you discipline yourself it will become second nature to you. Now I feel uncomfortable sitting!

Furthermore, by practicing slow going snotty trails standing you'll get used to the bike squirming underneath you. Riding slow through sand standing is even better. After a while you won't even notice it. Having said this, you won't need to grip the bike too hard. The only time I grip the bike hard standing is when I'm under acceleration or braking.

Keep at it mate!

Thanks all you guys. I will truely take your advice and practice with it :thumbsup:

My goal, be faster than my buddies, while not being outof control. And they're MFing Fast

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I live in the rocky mountains, so I deal with my fair share of rocky terrain. If you want to get faster on the rocky stuff, you'll have to stand. I don't know if it's proper to clamp the tank with your knees, but I don't.

When things get really rocky, try to keep your weight over the center of the bike, leaning slightly back. Feet should be in a comfortable position, I like to keep the pegs under my arches. With your arms, you need to be firm to keep the bars from turning, but you also need to be loose to allow the bike to pivot forward & backwards when you hit rocks. I think the ultimate goal is to move your body as little a possible. Your body & legs remain fairly still, while your arms flex to absorb the bumps. Your bike pivots under your feet, and you'll find you don't have to work nearly as hard to keep in control.

Picking a good line is probibly the best thing to practice. It is something you do need to practice too, sometimes the best line looks like the worst line to a less experienced rider.

I ride with slower rider all the time, don't be afraid to slow down if you get uncomfortable.

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Stand up. Try gripping the bike with your heels to add stability. It keeps your CG low and it is easier to recover when the bike tries to swap.

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stand up,its better to go through the tough section a speed than try and slow down to avoid it youll always get burned,stay loose dont death grip the bars and dont be affraid to take your feet off the pegs just dont touch the ground :thumbsup:

now if i can only get ride of arm pump

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I've been riding the north Georgia mountains for eight years. They're not the Rockies, but they can and usually are nasty as hell. Trees, boulders, roots, ruts...you name it, it's there. The majority of my riding over the last eight years has been on a CR250, more recently on a CRF450. I will tell you this with no uncertainty.

STAND UP. I'm not gripping with my knees all of the time, but certainly when on the gas really hard. Like the other guys said, the more speed you carry, the more success and ease you'll have. I'm always explaining it to newer and/or slower riders like this...it's kinda like trimming out a ski boat. With the suspension characteristics of an MX bike, you've got to be on the gas in order to get the bike to 'plane out' and cruise over the nasties. Like skipping a rock on a pond. If you slow down for the tough stuff, it will beat the hell out of you...same for sitting...the transfer of every bump through your body will beat you to death and wear you out FAST. Use your legs for suspension, stay on the gas enough to provide some loft out front, and keep your eyes and mind focused on the trail as far ahead as you can see (this does alot to help avoid 'target fixation' - if you're looking at the rock, you're gonna hit it). And above all else; Ride, Ride, Ride. The more you ride, the better you'll get.

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Trigger03- If your riding a DRZ and are fairly tall you may want to consider some taller bars and or risers. I'm 6'4" and until I changed the bar position I struggled standing :thumbsup:

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Trigger03- If your riding a DRZ and are fairly tall you may want to consider some taller bars and or risers. I'm 6'4" and until I changed the bar position I struggled standing :thumbsup:

Yep, did that. Got bar risers ad a taller bar so standing is not uncomfortable, just less control

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I'm no pro, but one of the tricks I picked up is peg weighting. It feels like I have more control of the pressure put on the outside peg in a corner when standing. This means more control in less than ideal conditions.

With some body english, you can slide the rear tire sideways through really tight corners. I'm not sure if this is good technique, but it is really fun and lets you turn sharp.

You can also get your body further over the bike in tight corners standing. For dexterity, trails riders are shocking and they never sit.

You also don't get monkey butt.

When sitting I weight the outside peg when turning. When standing I weigh the inside peg when turning, kind of like counter steering-it causes the bike to turn without turning the bars.

In rough terrain I don't really grip with my knees because I like the bike to float under me. On smooth stuff or 'breather sections' I stand a little taller and grip the tank with my knees.

Most of my riding is in the desert.

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I would say just do waht feels comfortable! If u feel comfartable hugging the bike while going through rocks than be it. People come in different sizes and shapes and everyone has their own riding techniue that they follow :thumbsup:

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I would say just do waht feels comfortable! If u feel comfartable hugging the bike while going through rocks than be it. People come in different sizes and shapes and everyone has their own riding techniue that they follow :thumbsup:

I'll have to go with you on that...no different than placement of levers or anything else for that matter. Have one buddy who's a really good rider/racer, he runs with his levers way up in the air, almost on a higher plane than the bars. I never would be able to ride like that, but it seems to work for him.

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I would say just do waht feels comfortable! If u feel comfartable hugging the bike while going through rocks than be it. People come in different sizes and shapes and everyone has their own riding techniue that they follow :thumbsup:

Yeah, I hear ya, but kindof like golf, you want to start with knowing the proven fundamentals and go from there.

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I have only had my bike out for 2 good rides now. Both rides were in the same location. Wayne National. The first day I was sitting 96% of the time cause it was teh first time I ever rode my bike for real. (other than around my block). The second time my riding buddy taught me to stand and lean the bike. We literally practiced it for 5 minutes n a parking lot doin as tight of figure 8's as we could while standing. Get in 1st gear and ride your clutch adn throttle and go as slow as you can while keeping the bike up and lean the towards the ground as close as you can get it. You weight the inside peg to start the lean then the outside to keep itr from falling over. Just keep your body vertical. One thing I've learned is keep your body vertical and let the bike move around under you as it needs to.

I improved from sitting slow 2nd gear turns to standing 3rd decently quick in just 35 miles of riding that day. I am now more comfortable standing then sitting just from making myself stand and lean the bike all day.

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I have only had my bike out for 2 good rides now. Both rides were in the same location. Wayne National.

Been to the Wayne N.F., many moons ago when I lived in Southern Ohio. But I never realized (or they didn't exist then) that there were ORV areas in Wayne. How are they? Any idea how many miles of trails?

shafe

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