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Which Givi case?

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E45N or the E360N

They are both roughly the same size and price so I was wondering if anyone had any opinions on them. The 360 looks more sleek but I dont really like that red reflector on the back. It looks kindof wierd. But on the other hand the reflector might save my ass.

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Go for the smaller 36's. 45 L are too big for a DRZ. Even the 36 L are going to look very large on the bike. They make smaller ones if that will work for you.

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Considering how high and far back it is mounted, I'd agree with noble. Put much weight in it and you'll develop some weird handling quirks.

While I don't load my klx with gear I have been known to use my tengai as a bit of a mule.

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Well I am buying it for a cross country trip so I need a lot of space. I won't be using it for around the town.

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How do you plan on loading your bike? Do you have some panniers as well or just using a top case?

I'd advise mounting the case as far forward as you can and try to keep the weight as close to over, or even better but not feasible, in front of the rear axle. I try to put the heaviest things directly behind me where a passenger would normally ride. Next heaviest goes in the bottom of the panniers and as far forward as possible. The lightest things, sleeping bag and pillow, go in a case on the very back since they take up room but don't really weigh very much.

Here is a pic of the tengai loaded, I'm in the middle of BFE and have enough water and food to last comfortably for three days.

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Mind you this bike has had it's suspension set up for this kind of use, unloaded it doesn't ride nearly as well as loaded with either gear or a passenger (add both and the handling suffers again).

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I plan on laoding however you tell me to. Seems like you have more experience then me in that area.

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I really enjoy touring and set up correctly a thumper makes a great mount :thumbsup:

How long of a trip are you going on? And where (as in always within a few miles of people or like where that last pic was taken and close to a hundred miles from the nearest house)?

If you get too much weight too far back you will notice it, the bike will start to feel like it has a hinge in the middle of it. I kid you not, improper loading will create some very weird and potentially dangerous handling charastics. I would recommend taking the time to load your bike in different ways and go for a ride to see how it handles before you load it for a trip. Once you get it loaded for the trip, reload it as close to the same way each time so it is consistent.

Use cord to tie heavier things down, it will not give like bungie cords do. I tie the cooler down since it is generally loaded and fairly heavy. Then I bungie the bedding bag, etc to it and around the base that is bolted to the rack.

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The pre-owner of my drz had a hand-made side and top case carrier.

It doesnt look great but it is very useful.

Also it protects the bike from scrathes and can be removed in 10 minutes.

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I really enjoy touring and set up correctly a thumper makes a great mount :thumbsup:

How long of a trip are you going on? And where (as in always within a few miles of people or like where that last pic was taken and close to a hundred miles from the nearest house)?

If you get too much weight too far back you will notice it, the bike will start to feel like it has a hinge in the middle of it. I kid you not, improper loading will create some very weird and potentially dangerous handling charastics. I would recommend taking the time to load your bike in different ways and go for a ride to see how it handles before you load it for a trip. Once you get it loaded for the trip, reload it as close to the same way each time so it is consistent.

Use cord to tie heavier things down, it will not give like bungie cords do. I tie the cooler down since it is generally loaded and fairly heavy. Then I bungie the bedding bag, etc to it and around the base that is bolted to the rack.

I am not sure how long the trip will be. I am leaving Michigan and heading South to Miami beach and just playing it by ear from there. Its is an on road trip and I should be fairly close to civilization the whole time (aside from a few desolate mountain roads).

I appreciate all the info so far and plan on taking every ounce of your advice. As I siad I am totally inexperienced in motorcycle roadtripping.

I plan on getting some bags for the front of my bike (tripletree bag, fender bag maybe tank bags) to load my tools in order to keep some weight up front. And like you said I am planning on taking a short to test it out. Maybe to a local camp grounds to test myself and see what I will need before I head to Florida.

Also I have been jotting down a lot of notes the past few weeks of things I may need and what not. Any suggestions on camping gear as I am planning on staying on campsites to save $ as opposed to Hotels?

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depecherider: those look great. They ae a very strong looking set-up and do a good job with keeping things where they belong.

Kalabula: Take as little as possible. I camp when I tour (not campgrounds, just cozy nooks in the woods by a stream) and I take long trips like the one you're planning for.

I take the following and would consider it the minimum for safety in off-the-beaten-path touring-and even if you're on the beaten path.

Camping gear:Thinsulate sleeping bag 5*C rating minumum (smaller than normal bags), tent, ground sheet (8x10 tarp), army mess kit, disposable shop towels (heavy paper towels) for all your wiping needs, disposable camera,propane torch and burner (optional-I havent taken mine last few times), toothbrush, t-paste and soap (skip towels and separate soaps for dishes, hands,hair,...a bit of dish soap in a small bottle or a cake of soap in a zip-lock bag is all you need for everything),

Tools: good multi-tool (ex. leatherman), 6" vise grips, selection of zip ties, 3-5' electrical wire (quite heavy gauge:14-16), duct tape (rolled around something such as fondu fuel cans-only take about 20' of it), bike's tool kit augmented as needed (hex keys, better quality wrenches, 8mm socket and nutdriver), flat fixing tools and small bicycle pump, stormproof lighter (Windmill Delta or mini-torch), mag-lite mini and spare batts and bulbs. 20'+ of 3/8"nylon rope, WD40 (for chain and fire starter), selection of nuts and bolts in common sizes as found on bike, rtv silicone ultra-black or red hi-temp,

Clothes:standard riding gear (10-30*C), cold weather underlayer(-10-+10*C), rain gear (also used to bring cold weather gear to max protection), Spare gloves, waterproof socks (even on the road), neck-warmer and helmet liner (snowmobile stuff), day gear for when you're stopped for a day or 2 and dont want to wander around in riding gear (t-shirt, sneakers, sweater, zip-off pant/shorts),

Emergency Gear: First aid kit, emergency fuel (fondu fuel in little cans), chemical hand warmers (tear, shake, wait:ahhhhh!), cell phone and charger, spare master link, noodles and beef jerky (3000+calories), survival-kit-in-a-can (dont know if this is a Canada only thing or not but it is a small can like sardines come in full of matches, fish hook and line, foil blanket, first-aid stuff, aerial signaling info, and a lot more-dont open unless you need it as you'll never get it back in and cant close the top once openned)

You can take a lot more but then your experience suffers as the bike becomes unwieldy. I have the stock rack. I lay down the ground sheet as a base, knap-sack full of clothes and emergency gear on it and tent and sleeping bag on top. Fold the ground sheet around the works and back under the base to waterproof the package. I then strap this on with ratcheting cargo straps (1"x12'-also handy) and wrap the works in a bungee net. I also carry a small day bag for maps, snacks, water, gloves, glasses, camera, sunscreen, bug dope... Buy food on the way to cook:ravioli, canned stew, hotdogs, sub sandwiches... I am pretty comfy in the woods so I dont take some things that others might (and should) take-I tend to set bad examples in things like this by not being well-enough prepared for some peoples' taste.

With this kit I am carrying about 20lbs total, am set for any weather I am likely to run into and can survive in total wilderness unaided while hiking out for several days (indefinitely if there's lots of critters) and am still presntable enough to go out to dinner with friends along the way.

wow-that took forever to write!

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Good write up robb :thumbsup:

I'll have to dig my list out and post it. Probably be tomorrow afternoon before I can though.

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Ya Im gonna have to gather up all your tips and print them out on a sheet of paper. I am going to go with the E360N case. It looks a little sleeker and the reflector on the back is probably a good safety feature.

Again thanks for the tips so far. Keep 'em coming, i'm listening!

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OK, here is the list I go off of when I tour. Mind you most of mine is in BFE and either alone or even worse with my 75 year old father riding his scooter, not that he is not a good rider because he is very good but it just increases my respsonsibilities because he is not mechanical at all.

Camping gear -

tent large enough for two persons and their gear

tarp for ground cloth (also works well to work on bike on top of so little pieces don't fall in the dirt/gravel etc.)

sleeping bag

pillow (what can I say I'm a softie :thumbsup: )

thermarest pad

single mantle propane lantern

single burner stove

cook set with stainless pots/pan and copper bottoms

mess kit to eat out of

paper towels for cleanup

folding saw and hatchet for fire wood

lighter

wood matches dipped in wax

ice chest

collapsable water jug

small battery lantern (for tent and back up flashlight)

dive flashlight with fresh batteries

2 16oz propane bottles

extra nylon cord

20 oz insulated cup

Bike gear -

SERVICE MANUAL

6,8,10,12,13 (for the odd honda), 14,17,19,22, and 24mm wrenches

6-17 sockets (same sizes as above)

1/4 and 3/8 inch drive rachets and extensions

large and small vice grips

assorted screwdrivers

impact driver

duct tape

tube

tire irons

spark plug wrench and extra plug

small can chain lube

small can wd40

jumper cables

siphon hose

small tin of extra fasteners

5 - 10 feet of bailing wire

Clothes - comfortable shoes for around camp or to walk in, (yes I also sightsee when I travel), towel, clean pair of socks for each day (at least one pair, more if I'll be hiking much), clean underware for each day, two pairs levi's,two long sleeved white t shirts, two short sleeved t shirts, two sweatshirts, one long john top, riding pants (either leather or my moose overboot ones depending on where I'm going), jacket (same as above regarding leather or thor), electric vest, thin raingear if I have my leathers (moose/thor are waterproof on their own), riding boots, bandana, baseball cap, shorts (at least one pair can double as a swim suit) to wear under riding pants so I can just slip off the overpant when I stop and will be much cooler (also the reason you'll see my sandals tucked under the bungie net ready for quick use).

Personal gear - castille soap for body and dishes (fully biodegradable), shampoo, shaving gear, toothbrush and paste, q-tips, balm for monkey butt, bandaids, triple antibiotic cream, sunscreen, advil, heavy duty pain pills, trianglular bandage, gauze, tape, pocket heaters and extra fuel sticks for them, tweezers, pocket knife, leatherman, toe nail clippers, $3.00 in change and some bills stashed in kit, prescriptions, small digital camera, cell phone and 12V charger (have a power port on the tengai), gps (hardwired to bike for main power), book to read, glasses, sunglasses, ear plugs, compass, signaling mirror, emergency blanket.

If I'm riding in areas with sparse population I carry enough food and water for a comfortable 3 days. They are used in camping but are replaced as soon as I pass a store the next day. Otherwise I'm a bit more relaxed about this but still carry enough for a full day regardless.

One tip I picked up years ago was to save my old underware, the kind getting really worn, and take them as a one use item. Toss them in the garbage when you put a clean pair on. Socks can also be done this way, just do it before you get holes in them or else they can cause other problems.

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MrVroom,

What exactly is required to mount one of those to the stock rack? Does Givi sell a mounting plate or what? I like it but to they have a slightly smaller one?

Thanks.

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MrVroom,

What exactly is required to mount one of those to the stock rack? Does Givi sell a mounting plate or what? I like it but to they have a slightly smaller one?

Thanks.

The Givi MonoLOCK series (not the MonoKEY series) come with a universal mounting plate. It will mount to any tubular-type rack. The Monolock series is their lighter duty stuff. It's still very durable, but just not quite as heavy as their Monokey stuff.

I don't think they have a much smaller case than the E30 that I listed. I have the same cases mounted to a couple of my scooters. I have owned a LOT of Givi luggage. Their quality is unbeatable.

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I have owned a LOT of Givi luggage. Their quality is unbeatable.

A couple of manufacturers also share this opinion. They are the only aftermarket suppliers of bags that manufacturers have used in recent history.

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